Applies To:

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Manual Chapter: Supporting Regular Expressions
Manual Chapter
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The WebAccelerator system supports regular expressions throughout the product. When the WebAccelerator system performs pattern matching based on a whole-string, it assumes all regular expressions are in the form of ^expression$, even if you do not explicitly set the beginning of line (^) and end of line ($) indicators. For substring searches, you enter the form of a regular expression as *expression.*
The string that the WebAccelerator system matches is dependent on the HTTP data type for which you are providing the regular expression. The HTTP data types and string are defined in the Table C.1.
www.siterequest.com
http://www.siterequest.com/apps/search.jsp?value=computer
query parameters
For example, the WebAccelerator system matches the following value set for the action query parameter:
unnamed query parameters
path segment
The name of the segment key, or the value set for the segment parameter, depending on what you have identified for the match.
For example, if you identify the path segment in ordinal 1 for the full path (counted from left-to-right) and parameter ordinal 0, that means that in the following URL you have identified the segment key:
The value set for the HTTP USER_AGENT request header.
The value set for the HTTP REFERER request header.
The WebAccelerator system uses the meta characters defined in the following table for pattern matching. You can use one of these meta characters as a literal value for fields that expect a regular expression, as long as you use the escape character.
Note that the WebAccelerator system assumes that the beginning and end of line meta characters exist for every regular expression it sees.
Note that the WebAccelerator system assumes that the beginning and end of line meta characters exist for every regular expression it sees.
For example, the expression G.*P.* matches to the following:
You can begin a pattern with the * character, which is the same as using the following:
For example, the expression G.+P.* matches to the following:
Do not begin a pattern with the + character. For example:
For example, the expression G.?P.* matches to the following:
GP
Do not begin a pattern with the ? character. For example:
Matches a set of characters. You can list the characters in the set using a string made of the characters to match.
For example, the expression C[AHR] matches to the following:
You can also provide a range of characters using a dash. For example, the expression AA[0-9]+ matches the following:
Matches any character not in the set. Just as with the character, [...], you can specify the individual characters, or a range of characters by using a dash (-).
For example, the expression C[^AHR].* matches the following:
For example, the expression AA(12)+CV matches the following:
exp1
exp2
Matches either exp1 or exp2, where exp1 and exp2 are regular expressions.
For example, the expression AA([de]12|[zy]13)CV matches the following:
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