Applies To:

Show Versions Show Versions

Manual Chapter: Using Templates and Changesets to Manage
Manual Chapter
Table of Contents   |   << Previous Chapter   |   Next Chapter >>

Enterprise Manager offers two versatile options that you can use to simultaneously manage multiple device configurations: templates and changesets.
A template is a tool that you use to create and deploy new configurations based on an existing device configuration. You use a template as a model, changing template variables to modify elements that are specific to the new (targeted) device. For example, if you manage devices in multiple data centers that reside in multiple time zones, you may want to create a template to set the time zone on a device. To do this, create a template that sets the time zone, and make the time zone setting a template variable. Then, edit the allowed values for the variable to include all the necessary times zones.
A changeset is a collection of user-defined configuration data that you create and save for any managed device in your network and distribute to other managed devices. For example, when you configure a BIG-IP® system, you typically specify certain profiles, monitors, and iRules. To set up these systems individually, you must keep track of each setting, and manually enter those values for every new device that you add to the network. However, if you use changesets, you can deploy the same profiles, monitors, and iRules configurations from one device to as many devices as needed.
Templates offer you the ability to set variables for different devices in the network, so you can use templates in conjunction with changesets to help manage common network configuration tasks. Since these options are somewhat inter-related, it helps to have a basic understanding of the elements associated with each.
Although changesets and templates each represent a collection of configuration files that you can use to manage device configurations, they differ in three primary ways, as outlined in the following table.
Used to deploy configuration data to devices, without changing any values of the configuration.
Used for a wide variety of tasks, including setting up a device, maintaining consistent configurations on multiple devices, and creating new applications.
Used to manage elements of configuration data that vary from device to device.
Used to stage a configuration that is customized for multiple devices, using device-specific variables.
Used primarily to stage individualized configuration changes for multiple devices.
Deploy common configurations to new devices
When you add a new device to your network, you can deploy common configuration elements from a prototypical device to the new device. You can change certain settings or variables specific to the new, targeted device.
Manage configuration standards across multiple devices
If there is a change in a standard configuration element for your network, you can modify it on one managed device, then deploy that modification to other managed devices.
Roll out new applications
You can deploy new application settings to as many devices as needed, reducing the time it takes to perform application installation when managing multiple BIG-IP systems.
Audit configuration changes
Enterprise Manager tracks in its database, any configuration changes you make to a device using templates or changesets. This can assist you in auditing changes later.
Manage network object dependencies
Using templates and changesets, you can automatically manage dependencies for network objects.
When creating a template or changeset, you can include any type of available object class. An object class is the general type of network object that you want to include in the template. For example, a BIG-IP virtual server named www_server_one belongs to the Local Traffic / Virtual Servers object class, and the named.conf file belongs to the System / BIND object class. The available object classes vary depending on the managed device and its licensed features. Enterprise Manager displays any associated network dependencies for objects.
In general for object classes, the last part of the class name is indicative of the object type. For example, if you include the Network / VLAN class, all objects that you affect in this class are VLANs. If you include the Local Traffic / Profiles / DNS class, all objects in this class are DNS objects. In contrast, for system classes, the class name does not clearly indicate which object is affected. Table 7.2 outlines the system class names and their related objects or settings.
Starting with version 9.4.3, BIG-IP systems use a different method of managing configuration files, and only the named.conf, main.cf, and master.cf objects noted in Table 7.2 appear in changesets. To view configuration settings and confirm compatibility with bigpipe commands, see Viewing device configurations.
BIG-IP® Local Traffic Manager, and for information about bigpipe commands, see the Bigpipe Utility Reference Guide. Documentation is available from the AskF5SM support site (https://support.f5.com).
To successfully copy a network object from one BIG-IP® system to another using changesets and templates, you must honor the network objects dependencies on the new system. A dependency is additional network object data or resources required for the primary object to function correctly. For example, when you configure a virtual server, you usually need to also define dependent objects or resources, such as pools, nodes, or profiles.
The presence of dependencies adds a level of complexity to the process of storing and copying device configurations. If you were to manually copy configuration files from one system to another, you would need to know each of the dependencies for every object or system setting that you plan to copy. However, when you use templates and changesets, Enterprise Manager automatically manages these dependencies.
Because you can use templates in a more granular fashion compared to changesets, you may not need to include dependencies in templates. For example, if you create a template simply to enable or disable a virtual server, you do not need to include dependencies because the action you are taking (enabling or disabling the virtual server) is the focus of the configuration change. When you deploy a template to a device to enable or disable a virtual server, the Enterprise Manager system changes the virtual servers state, and all dependent objects are affected as if you changed the virtual servers state on the managed device itself.
You typically use the Template and Changeset wizards to create a template or changeset. These wizards prompt you for the information required and automatically generate the proper syntax.
Once you create a template or changeset, you can review the text version. The network object elements and text syntax are defined as follows.
Every network object in a template or changeset must have a class directive. For example, if you include pools, Enterprise Manager includes the class path as follows:
This syntax informs the system that the object configuration that follows the text refers to local traffic objects, specifically pools. When you deploy this template or changeset, the system uses the bigpipe utility to add this configuration information as a pool configuration on the target device.
Any system settings contained in a configuration must specify a system class directive. For example, if you include DNS settings in a template or changeset, Enterprise Manager includes the system class path as follows:
This syntax informs the system that the configuration data that follows the text refers to system objects, specifically DNS settings. When you deploy this template or changeset, the system uses the bigpipe utility or other utilities to add the DNS settings to the appropriate configuration file on the target device.
Certain objects included in a changeset or template require additional information. For example, classes containing SSL certificate data require that you specify the object within the class directive, and if you include SSL certificates and SSL keys, you must specify the name of the target files. Enterprise Manager copies the object data with these directives to the sample.crt and sample.key files on the target device, respectively, as in the following example.
If a managed device supports administrative partitions, Enterprise Manager also includes object partition information in the template or changeset text. If you include an object targeted to a specific partition, the system precedes the object class directive with the following text, where target_partition is the name of the partition on the target device. For example:
This text directs the system to generate a shell write partition bigpipe command using the partition name you specified when the system verifies or deploys the template or changeset.
All class paths in a template or changeset must include the object configuration setting. For example, for a changeset that includes the virtual server MyVIP, which references its pool, MyPool, Enterprise Manager would include the following syntax:
Once you deploy the template or changeset, the target devices you selected contain the local traffic objects MyVIP and MyPool.
While changesets require that you manage network object dependencies, templates use variables to manage device configurations. Template variables are unique values or settings specific to each managed device. Variables can be virtual server names, node addresses, port information, and so forth.
Some network objects (such as nodes or pools) automatically generate variable information when you add them to a template. Other network objects (such as system settings) require that you manually add variable information such as the variable name and default value.
Because a template is essentially a guideline for a configuration change that you can apply to multiple devices, variables are specific to each device.
When you create a template with variables, you can modify template variable elements before you save the template. Additionally, you can view and modify these settings by clicking the Manage Variables button on a Template Properties screen.
Variable Name
Usually, the system chooses a variable name but, in some cases, you can specify the name for a variable. The variable name appears in the template configuration text and staged changeset if you do not specify a variable description.
Default Value
The system uses the default value for a variable when you deploy a changeset based on this template you created.
Description
Because only the variable name is visible in the template text, and is usually system-assigned, we recommend that you provide a variable description. This description allows you and others to properly apply the variable when you stage or deploy a changeset based on this template.
Editable
As an Administrator-level user, you can specify whether a user can change a variable when they use this template to stage a changeset.
Visible
If you restrict a users ability to edit the value of a variable, you can also hide the variable setting from restricted users when they use the template to stage a changeset.
Edit Allowed Values
As an Administrator-level user, you can also specify the allowed values for the template. Then any user staging a changeset with this template selects from a list of values, which can prevent errors.
When you create a custom template, you typically use the Template wizard to construct the template from network objects on a managed device. The wizard prompts you for the necessary information, and automatically generates the proper text syntax. Once the template is created, you can add additional variables to the template text as required, using the following format, where <variable_name> is the name of the variable in the network object.
For example, to create a template to disable a node, you can type the following in the Text box on the Template Variable Properties screen:
The first line specifies the variable @node_ip after the variable flag @define. The @define text flags the line as a variable, and prompts the system to replace the variable with a value when you deploy the template.
The fourth line starts the command to disable the node, and runs the session disable command on the node indicated by the variable @node_ip.
Although the leading at symbol (@) is not required for variables names, the Enterprise Manager uses it to distinguish a variable from static configuration information. The at symbol can also help you easily identify variables when you read the configuration text.
Note: When Enterprise Manager creates a variable automatically, it may write it with @replace before the variable name. Although this is a valid variable flag, it is much more granular than @define, which directs the system to look for a variable term.
Disables a local traffic pool member (allows established sessions)
Sets a local traffic pool member to down (allowing no new connections)
Disables local traffic server address (for all pools, only allowing established connections)
Sets a local traffic server address to down (for all pools, allowing no new connections)
Tip: You can use a standard template as the configuration source for a new template, changeset, or staged changeset. As an alternative, you can copy the template configuration information from the Template Properties screen to create a new text-based template, changeset, or staged changeset.
1.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management and click Templates.
The Templates list screen opens.
3.
In the templates list, click the name of a template.
The Template Properties screen opens.
By default, only Administrator-level users can create templates, which can be based on a device or any existing template, except standard templates. Alternatively, they can select text as a source and manually type the configuration, or copy the text of a configuration and paste it, into the Text box. Administrators can also delegate, to the Operator or Application Editor roles, the ability to use published templates. (For more information about managing user role permissions, see Managing user permissions, on page 3-18.)
1.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management and click Templates.
The Templates list screen opens.
2.
Above the list, click Create.
The New Template screen opens.
3.
In the Name box, type a name for the template. This name later appears on the template list.
4.
In the Description box, type a description for the template.
5.
From the Source list, select a source on which you want to base the template. The subsequent Template wizard screens vary, depending on the source you use.
If you selected Device, then from the Partition list, select the partition from which you want to copy objects.
If you selected Existing Template, then from the template list that appears, select a template by clicking the option button next to the template name.
If you selected Text, you do not need to do anything else on this screen.
6.
Click the Next button.
The Class Selection screen opens.
When you select a template or device as a source for the custom template, you must select an object class. An object class is the general type of network object that you want to include in the template. You select object classes from the Step 2 screen of the New Template wizard.
1.
In the Path List setting, select a class from the Available list, then click the Move button (<<) to move it to the Selected box.
2.
Repeat step 1 as necessary to add additional classes, and then click the Next button.
The Object Selection screen opens.
For each class you select, you must also select an associated object instance. An object instance is the specific network object you want to include in the template. You select object instances from Step 3 screen of the New Template wizard.
1.
In the Object List setting, select an object from the Available list, then click the Move button (<<) to move it to the Selected box.
2.
Repeat step 1 as necessary to add additional objects, and then click the Next button.
The Template Summary screen opens.
You can configure Enterprise Manager to automatically include dependent objects for selected object classes, or you can choose not to include them, and type them in manually on the target device when you deploy the changeset based on this template. You manage network dependency options from Step 4 screen of the New Template wizard.
1.
From the Dependency Handling list, select one of the following options:
2.
To view details for an object, click the name of an object in the User Selected Objects setting.
Details about that object appear below the list in several fields, some of which you can edit.
3.
To change details of an object that you selected, change any of the values in the editable fields that appear when you click an object name.
4.
To view details for an associated resource object, click the name of an object in the Resource Objects list.
Details about that object appear below the list.
5.
Click Next.
The Template Properties screen opens, where you can view the template properties you configured.
1.
To modify the contents of the template, select Advanced from the Template Text list. The screen displays the Add Path and Search and Replace buttons.
a)
From the Select Class Path list, select a new class path.
b)
Click the Add Path button.
The system generates the proper syntax for the class path, and adds it to the Text box.
a)
In the Search For box, type an existing value.
You can type a user-specified value such as an IP address or object name. This value is case-sensitive.
b)
In the Replace With box, type a new value.
c)
Click Search and Replace.
The system searches through the data in the Text box and prompts you to confirm any changes, if found.
4.
After you review or change information, click the Next button.
The Template Variables Properties screen opens.
From the Step 6 screen of the New Template wizard, review and edit the template variable values as required, and click the Finish button. The Template List screen opens, displaying the template you created.
When you create a custom template, it is available only for you to deploy and use. To make the template available for others, you must publish it. This adds an additional layer of control to device configuration management when combined with the requirement that all staged changesets must be verified before they are deployed.
1.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management and click Templates.
The Templates list screen opens.
2.
Click the name of the template you want to publish.
The General Properties screen opens.
3.
Check the Published box.
4.
Click the Save Changes button.
The template is now available for others to use as a source.
Templates are a flexible method for changing device configurations. You can share templates among Enterprise Manager devices in your network, or with other users through the F5 developer community DevCentral (http://devcentral.f5.com) by importing and exporting them.
Note: DevCentral is an online community featuring tools, technology, and collaboration for F5 products. After registering for free, you can access resources such as discussion forums, documentation wikis, and sample applications. In the Samples section, you can find sample templates for Enterprise Manager, and you can share templates that you create.
You can import a template from DevCentral by copying and pasting text from the site to the Text box of a new template. You can export a template by copying template text from the Template Export screen. After you copy the text, you can use it on other Enterprise Manager systems, or share it on the DevCentral CodeShare site.
1.
Log on to the DevCentral site, http://devcentral.f5.com using your account information.
2.
Click the Samples link at the top of the screen.
The Samples screen opens, displaying the latest contributions to the CodeShare pages.
3.
Click the Advanced Design & Config link.
The Advanced Design & Config CodeShare screen opens, listing all sample code available in this category.
4.
In the Sample EM Templates section, click the name of a sample template.
A screen opens describing the purpose of the template, what platforms it has been tested on, and any additional important information about the template.
8.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management and click Templates.
The Templates list opens.
9.
Above the template list, click the Create button.
The New Template screen opens.
10.
In the Name and Description boxes, type an appropriate name and description for the new template.
11.
For the Source setting, select Text.
12.
Click Next to move to the Template Properties screen.
13.
In the Text box, paste the text that you copied from DevCentral.
Note: If template properties such as name and description are defined in the template text, this supersedes any properties settings defined in the Template Properties table above the Text box.
14.
Click Next to move to the Template Variable Properties screen.
The text on the Template Export screen is formatted specifically for exporting. The text includes all the necessary settings in the proper syntax so that you can use the template on another system.
1.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management and click Templates.
The Templates list opens.
2.
Click the name of the template that you want to export.
The template general properties screen opens.
3.
On the menu bar, click Export.
The Export Template screen opens.
4.
In the Text box, highlight the template text.
After you copy the text, you can paste it into another Text box to create a new template, or you can submit it for inclusion on the DevCentral CodeShare site.
The easiest way to create a changeset is to use the Changeset wizard, which automatically locates dependencies for each network object that you include in the changeset. Additionally, the Changeset wizard writes all the syntax to correctly classify network objects and system settings in the changeset configuration file. This process ensures that you can successfully deploy the changeset to other managed devices.
Enterprise Manager stores changeset information in text form, ensuring compatibility with configuration files on a managed device. You can verify the compatibility of the changeset with managed devices in the network, then deploy it to those devices. This gives you better control over device configurations in your network.
By default, only Administrator-level users can create changesets. Administrators can delegate, to the Operator or Application Editor roles, the ability to stage a changeset using published templates. For more information about user roles, see Managing user permissions, on page 3-18.
1.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management and click Changesets.
The Changeset list screen opens.
2.
Above the list, click Create.
The New Changeset Step 1 screen opens.
3.
In the Name box, type a name for the changeset.
This name later appears on the changeset list.
4.
In the Description box, type a description for the changeset.
5.
From the Source list, select a source on which you want to base the changeset.
The subsequent Changeset wizard screens vary, depending on the source you use.
If you selected Device, skip to the procedure titled, To use a device as a changeset source, following.
If you selected Template, click the Next button, and then skip to the procedure titled, To use a template as a changeset source.
If you selected Text, click the Next button, and then skip to the procedure titled, To use text as a changeset source.
Note: For specific information about how to format text for a changeset, see Reviewing network object elements.
When you select a managed device as the source for a changeset, you specify the device and the partition from which you want to copy some or all of its device configuration. Administrative partitions are logical containers with a defined set of BIG-IP system objects, and are used for access control purposes.
Important: Administrative partitions are supported on BIG-IP software version 9.4.x and later. If you are working with changesets on a device that does not support administrative partitions, select Common for the partition. Common includes all partitionable BIG-IP system objects.
If you selected device for the changeset source, perform the following tasks from the Step 1 screen of the New Changeset wizard.
1.
From the Device list, select the device from which you want to copy objects.
2.
From the Partition list, select the partition from which you want to copy objects and click the Next button.
The Step 2 screen of the New Changeset wizard opens.
3.
In the Path List setting, select a class from the Available list, then click the Move button (<<) to move it to the Selected box.
4.
Repeat step 1 as necessary to add additional classes, and then click the Next button.
The Step 3 screen of the New Changeset wizard opens.
5.
In the Object List setting, select an object from the Available list, then click the Move button (<<) to move it to the Selected box.
6.
Repeat step 1 as necessary to add additional objects, and then click the Next button.
The Step 4 screen of the New Changeset wizard opens.
7.
Review the selected objects and click the Next button.
The Step 5 screen of the New Changeset wizard opens. Skip to Reviewing object dependencies for a changeset.
When you select a template as a changeset source, you can view the template and add new variables as required. For specific information about template variables, see Managing template variables.
If you selected template for the changeset source, perform the following tasks from the Step 1 screen of the New Changeset wizard.
1.
From the template list that appears, click the button next to a template name and click the Next button.
The Step 2 screen of the New Changeset wizard opens.
3.
To modify the value of an editable template variable, in the Value column adjacent to a variable name, type a new value or select a value from the value list.
4.
Click the Next button.
The Text of Changeset screen opens. Skip forward to Reviewing object dependencies for a changeset.
Creating a text-based changeset requires fewer steps in the wizard, however, the text must be accurate. Unlike when you use a device or template as a source, Enterprise Manager does not automatically manage dependencies and variable information when you use this option.
The text version of a changeset appears similar to what you may see in configuration files on a BIG-IP system. However, when Enterprise Manager creates a changeset, it uses additional directives in the text to control how the changeset is deployed to target devices.
1.
From the Select Path list, select a network object class, and click the Add Path button for each object class you want to add.
The object class path appears in the Text box.
Note: Alternatively, you can type the object classes and associated information directly into the Text box.
2.
In the Text box, type the configuration information associated with the object class paths you added.
3.
Click the Finished button to save the new changeset.
1.
From the Dependency Handling list, select one of the following options:
2.
To view details about an object, click the name of an object in the User Selected Object box.
Details about that object appear below the list in several fields, some of which are editable.
3.
To change details of an object that you selected, change any of the values in the editable fields that appear when you click an object name.
4.
To view details about an object, click the name of an object in the Resource Objects list.
Details about that object appear below the list.
5.
Click Next.
The Text of Changeset screen opens, where you can view the changeset you configured.
After you have configured a changeset, you can review the text for the changeset, make any necessary alterations, and then save it.
1.
To modify the contents of the changeset, select Advanced from the Text of Changeset list.
The screen displays the Add Path and Search and Replace buttons.
a)
From the Select Class Path list, select a new class path.
b)
Click the Add Path button.
The system generates the proper syntax for the class path, and adds it to the Text box.
a)
In the Search For box, type an existing value. You can type a user-specified value such as an IP address or object name. This value is case-sensitive.
b)
In the Replace With box, type a new value.
c)
Click Search and Replace.
The system searches through the data in the Text box and prompts you to confirm any changes, if found.
4.
After you review or change information, click the Finish button.
The Changeset List screen opens, displaying the changeset you created.
When you create a changeset, Enterprise Manager stores the changeset as text that represents the objects and dependencies you selected. You can change any details of the changeset for an object, such as dependencies, IP address, and so forth, at any time.
1.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management and click Changesets. The Changeset list screen opens.
To change the description of the changeset, in the Description box, type a new description.
To add objects to the changeset, in the Select Path list, select a network object class and add it to the text field by clicking Add Path, then type the object information below the class path you added.
4.
Click Save Changes to save the modified changeset.
Depending on your user role privileges, you can immediately verify or deploy an existing staged changeset. We recommend that you verify a staged changeset prior to deploying it to ensure that it works properly on the target device.
Using Enterprise Manager, you can store configuration information in changesets or templates, and deploy it to one or more BIG-IP systems in your network through staged changesets. A staged changeset is a configuration change in a staged state where a user can verify and approve it prior to deployment.
When you verify a changeset, Enterprise Manager checks to see if the network object classes included in the staged changeset work properly with the software installed on the target device. However, the verify feature does not check the validity of all possible system settings included in the changeset.
Using the Staged Changeset wizard
You can verify the changeset from screen 3 of the Staged Changeset wizard. See Verifying a staged changeset using the Staged Changeset wizard, following.
Using the Deploy Changeset wizard
To verify one or more staged changesets, you can use the Deploy Changeset wizard. See Verifying staged changesets using the Deploy Staged Changeset wizard.
Tip: If you specify that a template you create requires verification, then you must verify all staged changesets based on that template. Therefore, the Deploy button appears only after you verify the staged changeset.
When you create a new staged changeset, you have the option to verify the staged changeset on the last screen of the wizard. On this screen, you can also set staged changeset properties, and save the changeset.
1.
On the Staged Changeset Properties screen (Step 3 of 3 in the Staged Changeset wizard), at the bottom of the screen, click the Verify button.
The Verify Status screen opens, displaying information about the running bigpipe verify merge command, and indicates whether the staged changeset verification is successful on all target devices.
2.
Once the process quits running, click the Finished button to return to the Staged Changeset Properties screen.
To verify one or more staged changesets, you can use the Verify Staged Changeset wizard. When you complete the task, you can immediately deploy the staged changeset.
1.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management and click Staged Changesets.
The Staged Changeset screen opens.
3.
Click the Verify or Deploy button.
The Deploy Staged Changeset wizard screen opens.
4.
From the Error Behavior list, select one of the following options:
Continue task on remaining devices: the system continues to verify staged changesets for devices on which an error was not encountered, until the task finishes.
Cancel task on remaining devices: the system immediately stops the verification task if it encounters an invalid staged changeset, and does not verify staged changesets for pending devices.
5.
Click the Next button.
The Task Summary screen opens (screen 2 of Deploy Staged Changeset wizard).
6.
Click the Verify button.
The system verifies the deployment and displays the results in the Verification Results table.
7.
Click the Finished button.
The Task Summary screen opens.
The Task Options screen is step 1 of the Verify Staged Changeset wizard and prompts you to choose an error behavior for the verify task.
1.
1. From the Error Behavior list, select one of the following options:
Continue task on remaining devices: the system continues to verify staged changesets for devices on which an error is not encounters, until the task finishes.
Cancel task on remaining devices: the system immediately stops the verification task if it encounters an invalid staged changeset, and does not verify pending devices.
2.
Click Next to move to the Task Summary screen.
The Task Summary screen opens and displays task properties and a list of target devices on which the system will verify the associated staged changeset.
3.
In the Name box, change the task description if necessary.
4.
Click the Verify button.
The Verify Status screen opens, displaying information about the running bigpipe verify merge command. The system indicates whether the staged changeset verification is successful on all target devices.
After you create a changeset, you can deliver the device configuration data and settings in the changeset to any managed device in the network. As an alternative, you can take a current snapshot of a configuration on a managed device, and deliver that device configuration data to another managed device.
When you deploy configuration data to a managed device, Enterprise Manager delivers this data to the managed device, overwriting existing settings in configuration files. Before Enterprise Manager overwrites this information, it creates a backup of the original configuration settings, which provides you with the option to restore the original configuration for the device if needed.
From the Deploy Staged Changeset wizard
You can deploy a staged changeset from Task Summary screen of the Deploy Staged Changeset wizard. See Deploying a staged changeset using the Deploy Staged Changeset wizard, following.
From the Staged Changesets screen
You can deploy one or more existing staged changeset from the Staged Changesets screen. See Deploying staged changesets from the Staged Changeset screen.
After you verify a staged changeset from the Deploy Staged Changeset wizard and click the Finished button, you can then deploy the staged changeset.
1.
From Task Summary screen (screen 2 of Deploy Staged Changeset wizard), click the Deploy button.
The Deploy Staged Changeset screen opens, and the progress bar on the task list indicates the progress of the task. When the task is complete, the task results display in the Task Summary table.
2.
Click the Details link to view the task details, or click the Exit to Task List button.
1.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management and click Staged Changesets.
The Staged Changeset screen opens.
3.
Click the Verify or Deploy button.
The Deploy Staged Changeset wizard screen opens
4.
From the Error Behavior list, select one of the following options:
Continue task on remaining devices: the system continues the deployment task on devices for which an error is not encountered, until the task finishes.
Cancel task on remaining devices: the system immediately stops the deployment task if it encounters an error, and does not deploy the staged changeset to pending devices.
5.
Click the Next button.
The Task Summary screen opens (screen 2 of Deploy Staged Changeset wizard).
6.
Click the Deploy button.
The Deploy Staged Changeset screen opens and the progress bar on the task list indicates the progress of the task. When the task is complete, the task results display in the Task Summary table.
7.
Click the Details link to view the task details, or click the Exit to Task List button.
When you manage a device with Enterprise Manager, you can view specific elements of a device configuration file. Enterprise Manager provides a configuration viewer so that you can specify configuration settings for any object on a device.
Using the configuration viewer can save you time. Normally, to find specific configuration information in the configuration files on each managed device, you have to open a text configuration file and manually search for specific elements. Viewing configurations for objects may also assist you in creating changeset configurations.
1.
On the Main tab, expand Enterprise Management, then click Devices.
The Devices screen opens.
2.
In the device list, click the name of the device for which you want to view a configuration.
The device general properties screen opens.
3.
On the menu bar, click Configuration Viewer.
The Configuration Viewer opens.
4.
In the Partitions list, click the name of the partition that you want to view.
The Modules list changes to display all modules available on the managed device.
5.
In the Modules list, click the type of system configuration that you want to view.
The Paths list changes to display all object classes available on the managed device.
6.
In the Paths list, click the class of network object that you want to view. The Objects list changes to display all object instances of the class you selected.
7.
In the Objects list, click one or more network objects.
The screen changes to display a text view of the object configuration you selected.
See Creating a custom template, for more information about the elements of the configuration source text.
Table of Contents   |   << Previous Chapter   |   Next Chapter >>

Was this resource helpful in solving your issue?




NOTE: Please do not provide personal information.



Incorrect answer. Please try again: Please enter the words to the right: Please enter the numbers you hear:

Additional Comments (optional)