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Manual Chapter: Firewalls
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BIG-IP system firewall contexts

It is possible to have multiple layers of firewalls on a single BIG-IP system. These layered firewalls can be of the following types: VIP (virtual server), management IP address, self IP address, route domain, global. For each type, there can be many objects (for example, many VIPs). The result is that there can be hundreds of separate mini-firewalls in a single BIG-IP device.

On each firewall, you can have active rules or active rule lists. The order of the active rules and/or rule lists is important within a context. Hierarchy comes into play between contexts.

When you create a firewall rule, you can select one of the following contexts. Rules for each context form their own list and are processed both in the context hierarchy and in the order within each context list.

Global
Global rules are collected in the global firewall context. Global rules are checked first and apply to all traffic that traverses the firewall.
Route domain
Route domain rules are collected in the route domain context. Route domain rules apply to a specific route domain defined on the server. Route domain rules are checked after global rules. Even if you have not configured a route domain, you can apply route domain rules to Route Domain 0, which is effectively the same as the global rule context.
Virtual server
Virtual server rules are collected in the virtual server context. Virtual server rules apply to the selected virtual server only. Virtual server rules are checked after route domain rules.
Self IP
The self IP context collects firewall rules that apply to the self IP address on the BIG-IP device. Self IP rules are checked after virtual server rules.
Management IP
The Management IP context collects firewall rules that apply to the management port on the BIG-IP device. Management port rules are checked after self IP rules.
Note: For a firewall rule in a rule list, the Rule List context is predefined and cannot be changed.

BIG-IQ Security firewalls

A BIG-IP network firewall provides policy-based access control to and from address and port pairs, inside and outside the network. Using a combination of contexts, a firewall can apply rules in a number of different ways, including at a global level, per virtual server, and even for the management port or a self IP address.

To bring firewall(s) residing on a remote BIG-IP device under BIG-IQ Security control (declare management authority), hover in the Devices header until the + icon appears and you can click it. The Add devices flyout appears. Enter device properties to add devices (and any firewalls configured on those devices) to the BIG-IQ Security database.

Device properties

Device address Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

Username Administrator user name at the remote BIG-IP device.
Password Administrator password at the remote BIG-IP device.

Global firewalls

A global firewall is an IP packet filter that resides on a BIG-IP device. It is the first firewall that an IP packet encounters. Any packet reaching the device must pass through the global firewall first. The only packets that do not pass through this firewall are those that go through the device's management interface.

In the Devices panel, click a device to expand and view firewalls on the device. Click individual firewalls to view details of the firewall configuration in the flyout that expands to the right. Click these objects to view and edit them.

Right-click a rule to select Add rule before, Add rule after, or Delete rule.

You can reorder rules by dragging-and-dropping them to new locations in the list.

You can drag-and-drop rule lists and other shared objects from the Shared objects panel into firewalls.

When you drag a rule list into a firewall, BIG-IQ Security gives it a name by default. For example, Rulelist1 might be given the name referenceToRulelist1. You can change this name before you save the changes to the firewall. To change the name, click on the rule list name in the rule list instance row. The name changes to an editable state. Edit the name and then click Save. If you click on the field after you’ve clicked click Save, you can no longer edit the name.

Rule and rule list properties

Name User-provided rule name up to 128 characters.
Address (Source) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's source port.
VLAN Name of the VLAN physically present on the BIG-IP device. The VLAN must be configured on the BIG-IP device or the deploy operation fails.
Address (Destination) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's destination port.
Action From the drop-down list, options include:
  • ACCEPT. Accept the current packet. The packet is compared to rules in the next appropriate context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present.
  • ACCEPT DECISIVELY. Accept the current packet and do not compare the packet to any other firewall rules in any other context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall and does not require any further processing by any of the further firewalls. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present. CAUTION: This option is not available for all firewall types.
  • DROP. Silently drop the current packet. Nothing is sent back to the packet source. The packet is not compared with any other firewall rules. The action drops packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. Dropping the packet is a silent action with no notification to the source or destination systems. Dropping the packet causes the connection to be retried until the retry threshold is reached.
  • REJECT. Drop the current packet. For TCP-based protocols a TCP reset is sent to the source. For other protocols, reject is equivalent to drop. The action rejects packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. When a packet is rejected, the firewall sends a destination unreachable message to the sender.
Description Description for the current rule. To add a description, click in the space and enter text.
Protocol IP protocol to compare against the packet. Select the appropriate protocol from the drop-down list.
Schedule Schedule for the rule. If no schedule is specified, a default schedule is invoked with all rules enabled and with no time lapse. To specify a schedule, click in the space and enter the schedule name.
State Specifies whether the rule is ENABLED, DISABLED, or SCHEDULED. To change, select an action from the drop-down list.
Log Specifies whether the security software should write a log entry for all packets that match this rule. Select true or false from the drop-down list.

Route domain firewalls

A route domain is a BIG-IP system object that represents a particular network configuration. After creating a route domain, you can associate various BIG-IP system objects with the domain: unique VLANs, routing table entries such as a default gateway and static routes, self IP addresses, virtual servers, pool members, and firewalls.

When a route domain firewall is configured to apply to one route domain it means that any IP packet that passes through the route domain is assessed and possibly filtered out by the configured firewall.

When you create a firewall rule, you can select one of several contexts. Route domain is one of the contexts you can select. Rules for each context form their own list and are processed both in the context hierarchy and in the order within each context list.

Route domain rules apply to a specific route domain configured on the server. Route domain rules are checked after global rules. Even if you have not configured a route domain, you can apply route domain rules to Route Domain 0, which is effectively the same as the global rule context.

In the Devices panel, click a device to expand and view firewalls on the device. Click individual firewalls to view details of the firewall configuration in the flyout that expands to the right. Click these objects to view and edit them.

Right-click a rule to select Add rule before, Add rule after, or Delete rule.

You can reorder rules by dragging-and-dropping them to new locations in the list.

You can drag-and-drop rule lists and other shared objects from the Shared objects panel to the firewall properties flyout.

Rule properties
Name User-provided rule name up to 128 characters.
Address (Source) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's source port.
VLAN Name of the VLAN physically present on the BIG-IP device. The VLAN must be configured on the BIG-IP device or the deploy operation fails.
Address (Destination) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's destination port.
Action From the drop-down list, options include:
  • ACCEPT. Accept the current packet. The packet is compared to rules in the next appropriate context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present.
  • ACCEPT DECISIVELY. Accept the current packet and do not compare the packet to any other firewall rules in any other context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall and does not require any further processing by any of the further firewalls. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present. CAUTION: This option is not available for all firewall types.
  • DROP. Silently drop the current packet. Nothing is sent back to the packet source. The packet is not compared with any other firewall rules. The action drops packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. Dropping the packet is a silent action with no notification to the source or destination systems. Dropping the packet causes the connection to be retried until the retry threshold is reached.
  • REJECT. Drop the current packet. For TCP-based protocols a TCP reset is sent to the source. For other protocols, reject is equivalent to drop. The action rejects packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. When a packet is rejected, the firewall sends a destination unreachable message to the sender.
Description Description for the current rule. To add a description, click in the space and enter text.
Protocol IP protocol to compare against the packet. Select the appropriate protocol from the drop-down list.
Schedule Schedule for the rule. If no schedule is specified, the rule or rule list is enabled all the time. To specify a schedule, click in the space and enter the schedule name.
State Specifies whether the rule is ENABLED, DISABLED, or SCHEDULED. To change, select an action from the drop-down list.
Log Specifies whether the security software should write a log entry for all packets that match this rule. Select true or false from the drop-down list.

VIP firewall

A VIP/virtual server firewall is an IP packet filter configured on the virtual server and, therefore, designated for client-side traffic. Any IP packet that passes through the virtual server IP address is assessed and possibly filtered out by this firewall.

When you create a firewall rule, you can select one of several contexts. Virtual server is one of the contexts you can select. Rules for each context form their own list and are processed both in the context hierarchy and in the order within each context list.

Virtual server rules apply to the selected virtual server only. Virtual server rules are checked after route domain rules.

In the Devices panel, click a device to expand and view device details. Details appear in the flyout that expands to the right. Click these objects to view and edit them.

Right-click a rule to select Add rule before, Add rule after, or Delete rule.

You can reorder rules by dragging-and-dropping them to new locations in the list.

You can drag-and-drop rule lists and other shared objects from the Shared objects panel to the firewall properties flyout.

Rule properties
Name User-provided rule name up to 128 characters.
Address (Source) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's source port.
VLAN Name of the VLAN physically present on the BIG-IP device. The VLAN must be configured on the BIG-IP device or the deploy operation fails.
Address (Destination) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's destination port.
Action From the drop-down list, options include:
  • ACCEPT. Accept the current packet. The packet is compared to rules in the next appropriate context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present.
  • ACCEPT DECISIVELY. Accept the current packet and do not compare the packet to any other firewall rules in any other context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall and does not require any further processing by any of the further firewalls. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present. CAUTION: This option is not available for all firewall types.
  • DROP. Silently drop the current packet. Nothing is sent back to the packet source. The packet is not compared with any other firewall rules. The action drops packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. Dropping the packet is a silent action with no notification to the source or destination systems. Dropping the packet causes the connection to be retried until the retry threshold is reached.
  • REJECT. Drop the current packet. For TCP-based protocols a TCP reset is sent to the source. For other protocols, reject is equivalent to drop. The action rejects packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. When a packet is rejected, the firewall sends a destination unreachable message to the sender.
Description Description for the current rule. To add a description, click in the space and enter text.
Protocol IP protocol to compare against the packet. Select the appropriate protocol from the drop-down list.
Schedule Schedule for the rule. If no schedule is specified, the rule or rule list is enabled all the time. To specify a schedule, click in the space and enter the schedule name.
State Specifies whether the rule is ENABLED, DISABLED, or SCHEDULED. To change, select an action from the drop-down list.
Log Specifies whether the security software should write a log entry for all packets that match this rule. Select true or false from the drop-down list.

Self IP firewall

A self IP address is an IP address on a BIG-IP system that is associated with a VLAN and used to access hosts in that VLAN. By virtue of its netmask, a self IP address represents an address space; that is, a range of IP addresses spanning the hosts in the VLAN, rather than a single host address.

A static self IP address is an IP address that is assigned to the system and does not migrate between BIG-IP systems. By default, the self IP addresses created with the Configuration utility are static self IP addresses. One self IP address must be defined for each VLAN.

A self IP firewall is an IP packet filter configured on the self IP address, a firewall designated for server-side traffic. Any IP packet that passes through the self IP is assessed and possibly filtered out by this firewall.

When you create a firewall rule, you can select one of several contexts. Self IP is one of the contexts you can select. Rules for each context form their own list and are processed both in the context hierarchy and in the order within each context list.

The self IP context collects firewall rules that apply to the self IP address on the BIG-IP device. Self IP rules are checked after virtual server rules.

In the Devices panel, click a device to expand and view device details. Details appear in the flyout that expands to the right. Click these objects to view and edit them.

Right-click a rule to select Add rule before, Add rule after, or Delete rule.

You can reorder rules by dragging-and-dropping them to new locations in the list.

You can drag-and-drop rule lists and other shared objects from the Shared objects panel to the firewall properties flyout.

Rule properties
Name User-provided rule name up to 128 characters.
Address (Source) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's source port.
VLAN Name of the VLAN physically present on the BIG-IP device. The VLAN must be configured on the BIG-IP device or the deploy operation fails.
Address (Destination) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's destination port.
Action From the drop-down list, options include:
  • ACCEPT. Accept the current packet. The packet is compared to rules in the next appropriate context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present.
  • ACCEPT DECISIVELY. Accept the current packet and do not compare the packet to any other firewall rules in any other context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall and does not require any further processing by any of the further firewalls. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present. CAUTION: This option is not available for all firewall types.
  • DROP. Silently drop the current packet. Nothing is sent back to the packet source. The packet is not compared with any other firewall rules. The action drops packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. Dropping the packet is a silent action with no notification to the source or destination systems. Dropping the packet causes the connection to be retried until the retry threshold is reached.
  • REJECT. Drop the current packet. For TCP-based protocols a TCP reset is sent to the source. For other protocols, reject is equivalent to drop. The action rejects packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. When a packet is rejected, the firewall sends a destination unreachable message to the sender.
Description Description for the current rule. To add a description, click in the space and enter text.
Protocol IP protocol to compare against the packet. Select the appropriate protocol from the drop-down list.
Schedule Schedule for the rule. If no schedule is specified, the rule or rule list is enabled all the time. To specify a schedule, click in the space and enter the schedule name.
State Specifies whether the rule is ENABLED, DISABLED, or SCHEDULED. To change, select an action from the drop-down list.
Log Specifies whether the security software should write a log entry for all packets that match this rule. Select true or false from the drop-down list.

Management firewall

A management firewall is an IP packet filter configured on the management IP address and, therefore, designated for management traffic. Any IP packet that passes through the management IP address is assessed and possibly filtered out by this firewall.

The network software compares IP packets to the criteria specified in management firewall rules. If a packet matches the criteria, then the system takes the action specified by the rule. If a packet does not match a rule, then the software compares the packet against the next rule. If a packet does not match any rule the packet is accepted.

When you create a firewall rule, you can select one of several contexts. The management interface is one of the contexts you can select. Rules for each context form their own list and are processed both in the context hierarchy and in the order within each context list.

Management firewall rules apply to the selected management interface only. Management firewall rules are checked after self IP rules.

In the Devices panel, click a device to expand and view device details. Details appear in the flyout that expands to the right. Click these objects to view and edit them.

Right-click a rule to select Add rule before, Add rule after, or Delete rule.

You can reorder rules by dragging-and-dropping them to new locations in the list.

You can drag-and-drop rule lists and other shared objects from the Shared objects panel to the firewall properties flyout.

Rule properties

Name User-provided rule name up to 19 characters.
Address (Source) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's source port.
VLAN Name of the VLAN physically present on the BIG-IP device. The VLAN must be configured on the BIG-IP device or the deploy operation fails. VLANs are not supported on the management firewall.
Address (Destination) Collection of IPv4 or IPv6 addresses or lists of addresses to compare against the packet's source address.

IPv4 format: a.b.c.d[/prefix]. For example: 60.63.10.10

IPv6 format: a:b:c:d:e:f:g:h[/prefix]. For example: 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329

IPv6 abbreviated form is supported.

You can shorten IPv6 addresses by eliminating leading zeros from each field. For example, you can shorten 2001:0db7:3f4a:09dd:ca90:ff00:0042:8329 to 2001:db7:3f4a:9dd:ca90:ff00:42:8329.

You can also shorten IPv6 addresses by removing the longest contiguous field of zeros. For example, you can shorten 2001:0:0:0:c34a:0:23ff:678 to 2001::c34a:0:23ff:678. The Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) accepts any valid text representation of IPv6 addresses, as defined in RFC 2373. For information about RFC 2373, see http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2373.txt.

You can specify subnets using forward slash (/) notation; for example: 60.63.10.0/24. An example of an IPv6 subnet is as follows: 2001:db8:a::/64.

You can append a route domain to an address using the format %RouteDomainID/Mask. For example, 12.2.0.0%44/16.

Port Collection of ports, port ranges, or lists of ports to compare against the packet's destination port.
Action From the drop-down list, options include:
  • ACCEPT. Accept the current packet. The packet is compared to rules in the next appropriate context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present.
  • ACCEPT DECISIVELY. Accept the current packet and do not compare the packet to any other firewall rules in any other context. The action allows packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol to pass through the firewall and does not require any further processing by any of the further firewalls. Packets that match the rule and are accepted, traverse the system as if the firewall were not present. CAUTION: This option is not available for all firewall types.
  • DROP. Silently drop the current packet. Nothing is sent back to the packet source. The packet is not compared with any other firewall rules. The action drops packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. Dropping the packet is a silent action with no notification to the source or destination systems. Dropping the packet causes the connection to be retried until the retry threshold is reached.
  • REJECT. Drop the current packet. For TCP-based protocols a TCP reset is sent to the source. For other protocols, reject is equivalent to drop. The action rejects packets with the specified source, destination, and protocol. When a packet is rejected, the firewall sends a destination unreachable message to the sender.
Description Description for the current rule. To add a description, click in the space and enter text.
Protocol IP protocol to compare against the packet. Select the appropriate protocol from the drop-down list.
Schedule Schedule for the rule. If no schedule is specified, the rule or rule list is enabled all the time. To specify a schedule, click in the space and enter the schedule name.
State Specifies whether the rule is ENABLED, DISABLED, or SCHEDULED. To change, select an action from the drop-down list.
Log Specifies whether the security software should write a log entry for all packets that match this rule. Select true or false from the drop-down list.
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