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Manual Chapter: Managing the BIG-IP System Configuration
Manual Chapter
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When you perform configuration tasks on the BIG-IP® system, the system generates underlying configuration data. The system must store this data so that the data is not lost when an unexpected system event occurs, or you restart the system. Before the system can store this data, however, the data must be saved.
More specifically, the BIG-IP system configuration data exists in two different states: the stored configuration and the running configuration:
The stored configuration comprises all of the configuration tasks that you have performed on the system and saved to the system configuration files.
The running configuration comprises the stored configuration and all of the changes that you have made to the system since the last save operation. The BIG-IP system operates based on the running configuration.
Important: This chapter applies to bigpipe utility and tmsh users only. If you are using the Configuration utility to configure the BIG-IP system, the information in this chapter is not required. The Configuration utility manages all configuration data automatically.
Configuration utility
If you are using the browser-based BIG-IP Configuration utility, the utility automatically saves the configuration data for you as you complete each configuration task; you do not need to perform any additional steps to save configuration data. For this reason, this chapter serves primarily as background information and is not required for you to configure the system successfully.
bigpipe utility or tmsh
If you are using one of these command line tools to configure the system, you must explicitly issue a save command to store the configuration data you have generated. Otherwise, the newly-generated configuration data is not actually stored on the system. The save command can be either of the following:

bigpipe [base save | save | save all]
tmsh sys save [base-config | config]
To summarize, the commands bigpipe [base save | save | save all] and tmsh sys save [base-config | config] write the running configuration to the stored configuration files. This ensures that recent configuration changes are retained.
Warning: If multiple users are making changes to the system, and one user runs either of the command sequences bigpipe save all or tmsh sys save config, the system saves the changes made by all of the users.
Important: Only users assigned the Administrator or Resource Administrator user role can run the command sequences bigpipe save all and tmsh sys save config. Users assigned other roles receive an error when they run these commands. They must instead run the bigpipe save command.
The commands bigpipe [base load | load] and
tmsh sys load [base-config | config] reset the running configuration with the values that are contained in the stored configuration.
Therefore, when you are modifying the system configuration, if you run any of the load commands before you save your changes to the stored configuration, the changes are lost. Similarly, if you restart the system before saving any recent changes, the changes are lost, because restarting the system utilizes the stored configuration.
Table 5.1 describes the load and save commands in relation to the system configuration states.
Table 5.1 About the bigpipe and tmsh commands that affect the system configuration states
The BIG-IP system has numerous stored configuration files. You can make changes to the BIG-IP system by configuring these files using bigpipe or tmsh commands. While some of these files can actually be configured manually by editing the files directly, other files require you to use the bigpipe and tmsh commands to make changes to the files.
Important: If you manually edit these files, the changes do not take effect in the running configuration until you run one of the load commands.
You run either the bigpipe load or tmsh sys load config command sequence to load the configuration from the bigip.conf file into the systems running configuration.
You run either the command bigpipe save all or tmsh sys save config to save the running configuration into the bigip.conf file.
Important: Some objects, such as SNATs, do not reside in partitions. Therefore, if you edit this file, and add one of these objects to a section of the file that configures a specific partition, when you run the command bigpipe save all or
tmsh sys save config, the object is saved, but not in the partition. Consequently, the object is not protected by partition access control.
Stores the BIG-IP system network components. When you perform a configuration synchronization of a redundant system, this file is not synchronized to the other unit.
You run either the bigpipe base load or tmsh sys load base-config command sequence to load the configuration from the bigip_base.conf file into the systems running configuration.
You run either the command bigpipe save all or tmsh sys save config to save the running configuration to the bigip_base.conf file.
You run either the bigpipe base load or tmsh sys load base-config command sequence to load the configuration from the bigip_local.conf file into the systems running configuration.
You run either the bigpipe save all or tmsh sys save config command sequence to write the running configuration into the bigip_local.conf file.
Stores the Linux or UNIX configuration objects. When you perform a configuration synchronization of a redundant system, this file is synchronized to the other unit.
You run either the bigpipe base load or tmsh sys load base-config command sequence to load the configuration from the bigip_base.conf file into the systems running configuration.
You run either the bigpipe save all or tmsh sys save config command sequence to write the running configuration into the bigip_sys.conf file.
Note: The objects in these files reside in partition Common. Consequently, the objects have limited protection by partition access control.
In addition to configuring the files listed in Table 5.2, you can also configure other stored configuration files. You can use bigpipe and tmsh commands to make changes to these files. Table 5.3 lists and describes these commands.
Warning: Never edit these configuration files directly with a text editor. The BIG-IP system ignores such changes when you perform a subsequent save operation.
Important: After you run the commands shown in the table, you must run either the bigpipe save all or the tmsh sys save config command sequence to update the stored configuration.
Associated bigpipe command sequences and tmsh components
Stores configuration information for user authentication for the BIG-IP system.
tmsh auth [ldap | partition | password radius | radius-server | tacacs | user]
Stores configuration information for user authentication for the web server.
Maps the system users to their assigned user role and partitions.
Stores HTTP daemon configuration information for the web server.
Stores configuration information about the SSL module for the web server.
Stores configuration information about the Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) for the web server.
Stores the configuration information for the NTP server.
This is the configuration file for the secure shell server (SSH). It contains all the access information for people trying to get into the system by using SSH.
Store configuration settings for the snmpd daemon.
Stores the hosts table for the BIG-IP system.
Stores the IP addresses of workstations that are allowed to make administrative shell connections to the BIG-IP system.
Stores the IP addresses of workstations that are not allowed to make administrative shell connections to the BIG-IP system.
Stores the configuration of the local time of day.
Stores the parameters for user IDs and passwords.
Stores the configuration settings for the system logs.
Stores rate class definitions.
For information on making changes to rate classes, see the Configuration Guide for BIG-IP® Local Traffic Manager.
Stores SNMP configuration settings.
Stores network configuration settings, including the host name, and IP address of the gateway.
Stores the system log configuration settings.
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