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Manual Chapter: SNMP
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11 
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an industry-standard protocol that gives a standard SNMP management system the ability to remotely manage a device on the network. One of the devices that an SNMP management system can manage is a BIG-IP® system. The SNMP versions that the BIG-IP system supports are: SNMP v1, SNMP v2c, and SNMP v3. The BIG-IP system implementation of SNMP is based on a well-known SNMP package, Net-SNMP, which was formerly known as UCD-SNMP.
To configure and manage SNMP, log in to the BIG-IP Configuration utility, and on the Main tab, expand Network, and click SNMP.
A standard SNMP implementation consists of an SNMP manager, which runs on a management system and makes requests to a device, and an SNMP agent, which runs on the managed device and fulfills those requests. SNMP device management is based on the standard management information base (MIB) known as MIB-II, as well as object IDs and MIB files.
The MIB defines the standard objects that you can manage for a device, presenting those objects in a hierarchical, tree structure.
Each object defined in the MIB has a unique object ID (OID), written as a series of integers. An OID indicates the location of the object within the MIB tree.
A set of MIB files resides on both the SNMP manager system and the managed device. MIB files specify values for the data objects defined in the MIB. This set of MIB files consists of standard SNMP MIB files and enterprise MIB files. Enterprise MIB files are those MIB files that pertain to a particular company, such as F5 Networks®, Inc.
Typical SNMP tasks that an SNMP manager performs include polling for data about a device, receiving notifications from a device about specific events, and modifying writable object data.
To comply with the standard SNMP implementation, the BIG-IP system includes both an SNMP agent, a set of standard SNMP MIB files, and a set of enterprise MIB files (those that are specific to the BIG-IP system). The enterprise MIB files typically reside on both the BIG-IP system and system running the SNMP manager. Fortunately, you can use the browser-based Configuration utility to download the enterprise MIB files to your SNMP manager.
Before you can use an SNMP manager system to manage a BIG-IP system remotely, you must perform the following procedures on the BIG-IP system, using the BIG-IP® Configuration utility.
Configuring the SNMP agent
There are a number of ways to configure the SNMP agent on the BIG-IP system. For example, you can allow client access to information that the SNMP agent collects, and you can configure the way that the SNMP agent handles SNMP traps. (Traps are definitions of unsolicited notification messages that the BIG-IP alert system and the SNMP agent send to the SNMP manager when certain events occur.)
Downloading MIB files
You can download two sets of MIB files to your remote manager system: the standard SNMP MIB files and the enterprise MIB files.
Note: An alternate way to configure SNMP is to use tmsh. For more information, see the Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) Reference Guide.
Configuring BIG-IP system information
Specify a system contact name and the location of the BIG-IP system.
Configuring client access to the SNMP agent
Configure the BIG-IP system to allow access to the SNMP agent from an SNMP manager system.
Controlling access to SNMP data
Assign access levels to SNMP communities or users, to control access to SNMP data.
Configuring traps
Enable or disable traps and specify the destination SNMP manager system for SNMP traps.
Note: Only users with either the Administrator or Resource Administrator user role can configure SNMP on the BIG-IP system.
There is a default access level for communities, and this access level is read-only. This means that you cannot write to an individual data object that has a read/write access type until you change the default read-only access level of the community or user.
When you set the access level of a community or user to read/write, and an individual data object has a read-only access type, access to the object remains read-only. In short, the access level or type that is the most secure takes precedence when there is a conflict. Table 11.1 illustrates this point.
And you set the access level of a community or user to...
There are two sets of MIB files that typically reside on the BIG-IP system and the SNMP manager system: enterprise MIB files (that is, F5®-specific MIB files) and standard SNMP MIB files.
Both sets of MIB files are present on the BIG-IP system, in the directory /usr/share/snmp/mibs. However, you still need to download them to your SNMP manager system. You can download these MIB files from the Welcome screen of the browser-based Configuration utility.
The implementation of the Packet Velocity® ASIC (PVA) feature affects the ability for users to use MIB-II to gather certain kinds of data. For example, with a PVA system, you can use MIB-II to collect statistics on physical system interfaces, but not on logical interfaces (that is, VLANs).
The BIG-IP system uses MIB-II for gathering standard Linux data only. You cannot use MIB-II to gather data that is specific to the BIG-IP system and instead must use the F5 enterprise MIB files. All OIDS for BIG-IP system data are contained in the F5 enterprise MIB files, including all interface statistics (1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.2.4 (sysNetwork.sysInterfaces)).
If you want to use SNMP to monitor a specific process on the BIG-IP system, you can use the HOST-RESOURCES MIB and then write a script to monitor that process. Then, for example, to determine the number of TMM processes currently running on the system, you can use a command such as the following:
Note: All BIG-IP system statistics are defined by 64-bit counters. Thus, because only SNMP v2c supports 64-bit counters, your management system needs to use SNMP v2c to query BIG-IP system statistics data.
The F5 enterprise MIB files contain information that you can use for your remote management station to: poll the SNMP agent for BIG-IP system-specific information, receive BIG-IP system-specific notifications, or set BIG-IP system data.
Once you have downloaded all of the necessary MIB files, you should familiarize yourself with the contents of the enterprise MIBs, for purposes of managing the BIG-IP system and troubleshooting BIG-IP system events.
Note: To manage a BIG-IP system with SNMP, you need to use the standard set of SNMP commands. For information about SNMP commands, consult your favorite third-party SNMP documentation, or visit the web site http://net-snmp.sourceforge.net.
The F5-BIGIP-COMMON-MIB.txt file contains objects pertaining to any common information, as well as all F5-specific notifications (SNMP traps). This MIB file specifies and defines objects for which all other BIG-IP MIB files reference. You can identify the traps within this MIB file by viewing the file and finding object names that show the designation NOTIFICATION-TYPE.
When an F5-specific trap sends a notification to the SNMP manager system, the SNMP manager system receives a text message describing the event or problem that has occurred. For troubleshooting assistance regarding F5-specific traps, see Appendix A, Troubleshooting SNMP Traps.
The F5-BIGIP-LOCAL-MIB.txt file contains information about the properties associated with any local traffic management object (virtual servers, pools, nodes, profiles, SNATs, health monitors, and iRules®). An SNMP manager system can access and use this information to help you manage local application traffic.
The F5-BIGIP-SYSTEM-MIB.txt file describes objects representing common BIG-IP system information. Examples of information in this MIB file are global statistic data, network information, and platform information. Some of the data in this MIB file is similar to that defined in MIB-II, but is not exactly the same.
The F5-BIGIP-GLOBAL-MIB.txt file contains information that an SNMP manager system can use to help manage global application traffic objects, such as wide IPs, virtual servers, pools, links, servers, and data centers. You can reset statistics for any of these objects.
In addition to the F5 enterprise MIB files, the BIG-IP system also provides the remote network monitoring (RMON) MIB file, RMON-MIB.txt.
The implementation of RMON on the BIG-IP system differs slightly from the standard RMON implementation, in the following ways:
The BIG-IP system implementation of RMON supports four of the nine RMON groups. The four supported RMON groups are: statistics, history, alarms, and events.
The RMON-MIB.txt file monitors the BIG-IP system interfaces (that is, sysIfIndex), and not the standard Linux interfaces.
For hardware reasons, the packet-length-specific statistics in the RMON statistics group offer combined transmission and receiving statistics only. This behavior differs from the behavior described in the definitions of the corresponding object IDs.
The Configuration utility on the BIG-IP system displays graphs showing performance metrics for the system. However, you can also use SNMP to collect the same information.
Each type of metric has one or more SNMP object IDs (OIDs) associated with it. To gather performance data, you specify these OIDs with the appropriate SNMP command.
For example, the following SNMP command collects data on current memory use, where public is the community name and bigip is the host name of the BIG-IP system:
For some types of metrics, such as memory use, simply issuing an SNMP command with an OID gives you the information you need. For other types of metrics, the data that you collect with SNMP is not useful until you perform a calculation on it to interpret the data.
For example, to determine the throughput rate of client bits coming into the BIG-IP system, you must you must use the relevant OID (sysStatClientBytesIn (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.3)) to take two polls at a certain interval (such as ten seconds), calculate the delta of the two polls, and then perform the following calculation on that delta value:
Important: For calculations that include a polling interval, the interval can be any amount of time that you choose, as long as you use that same number as the value for <interval> in your calculations. Note that the performance graphs that the Configuration utility displays are based on a polling interval of ten seconds.
The calculations that you must perform to interpret the performance data that you collect (not required for interpreting data on memory use and active connections).
You can use an SNMP command with OIDs to gather data on the number of bytes of memory currently being used on the BIG-IP system. Table 11.2 shows the OIDs that you need to specify to gather data on current memory use. To interpret data on memory use, you do not need to perform a calculation on the collected data.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
You can use SNMP commands with various OIDs to gather data on the number of active connections on the BIG-IP system. Table 11.3 shows the OIDs that you need to specify to gather data on active connections. To interpret data on active connections, you do not need to perform any calculations on the collected data.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Active Connections
(summary graph)
Active Connections
(detailed graph)
You can use SNMP commands with various OIDs to gather and interpret data on the number of new connections on the BIG-IP system.
First, for each OID, you must perform two separate polls, at a time interval of your choice.
Finally, for each graph metric, you perform a calculation on those OID deltas.
Table 11.4 shows the individual OIDS that you must poll to retrieve two separate poll values for each OID.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
New Connections
(summary graph)
Total New Connections
(detailed graph)
New PVA Connections
(detailed graph)
New Client SSL Profile Connections
(detailed graph)
sysClientsslStatTotNativeConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.9.6) sysClientsslStatTotCompatConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.9.9)
sysServersslStatTotNativeConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.10.6) sysServersslStatTotCompatConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.10.9)
New Accepts/Connects
(detailed graph)
1.
Poll OID sysTcpStatAccepts (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.12.6) twice, at a 10-second interval.
This results in two values, <sysTcpStatAccepts1> and <sysTcpStatAccepts2>.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
3.
Calculate the value of the Client Accepts graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 11.5 (<DeltaTcpStatAccepts> / <interval>), where the value of <interval> is 10.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
New Connections
(summary graph)
Total New Connections
(detailed graph)
New PVA Connections
(detailed graph)
New SSL Connections
(detailed graph)
( <DeltaClientsslStatTotNativeConns> + <DeltaClientsslStatTotCompatConns>) / <interval>
(<DeltaServersslStatTotNativeConns> + <DeltaServersslStatTotCompatConns>) / <interval>
New Accepts/Connects
(detailed graph)
You can use SNMP commands with various OIDs to gather and interpret data on the throughput rate on the BIG-IP system, in terms of bits per second.
First, for each OID, you must perform two separate polls, at an interval of your choice.
Finally, for each graph metric, you perform a calculation on those OID deltas.
Table 11.6 shows the individual OIDS that you must poll, retrieving two separate poll values for each OID.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Throughput
(summary graph)
sysStatClientBytesIn (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.3) sysStatClientBytesOut (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.5)
sysStatServerBytesIn (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.10) sysStatServerBytesOut (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.12)
Client-side Throughput
(detailed graph)
Server-side Throughput
(detailed graph)
HTTP Compression Rate
(detailed graph)
1.
Poll OID sysStatServerBytesIn (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.10) twice, at a 10-second interval.
This results in two values, <sysStatServerBytesIn1> and <sysStatServerBytesIn2>.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
3.
Calculate the value of the Server Bits In graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 11.7 (<DeltaStatServerBytesIn> / <interval>), where the value of <interval> is 10.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Throughput
(summary graph)
Throughput
(detailed graph)
You can use SNMP commands with an OID to gather and interpret data on the number of current HTTP requests on the BIG-IP system, in terms of requests per second.
Table 11.8 shows the OID that you must poll, retrieving two separate poll values for this OID.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
For example, to collect data on HTTP requests for the HTTP Requests graph metric, follow these steps.
1.
Poll OID sysStatHttpRequests (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.56) twice, at a 10-second interval.
This results in two values, <sysStatHttpRequests1> and <sysStatHttpRequests2>.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
3.
Calculate the value of the HTTP Requests graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 11.9, where the value of <interval> is 10.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Table 11.10 shows the individual OIDS that you must use to poll for RAM Cache data.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
sysHttpStatRamcacheHits (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.46) sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.47)
sysHttpStatRamcacheHitBytes (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.49) sysHttpStatRamcacheMissBytes (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.50)
sysHttpStatRamcacheEvictions (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.54) sysHttpStatRamcacheHits (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.46) sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.47)
1.
Poll the OID sysHttpStatRamcacheHits (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.46). This results in a value of <sysHttpStatRamcacheHits1>.
2.
Poll the OID sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.47). This results in a value of <sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses1>.
3.
Calculate the value of the Hit Rate graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 11.11 (<sysHttpStatRamcacheHits1> / (<sysHttpStatRamcacheHits1> + <sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses1>) *100).
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
<sysHttpStatRamcacheHitBytes1> / (<sysHttpStatRamcacheHitBytes1> + <sysHttpStatRamcacheMissBytes1> ) *100
You can use SNMP commands to gather and interpret data on CPU use on the BIG-IP system. Specifically, you can gather and interpret data for these types of graph metrics:
CPU[0-n] and Global Host CPU Usage
For these graph metrics, you can either instruct the BIG-IP system to collect the data automatically, based on a predefined polling interval, or you can use a polling interval of your choice. In either case, you use the MIBs named sysMultiHostCpu and sysGlobalHostCpu, respectively.

Collecting data based on a predefined polling interval is the recommended way to collect CPU[0-n] and Global Host CPU Usage graph metrics. However, you can also perform the calculation manually, if you want to use a polling interval other than 5 seconds, one minute, or five minutes.

For the procedure about collecting CPU[0-n] and Global Host CPU Usage graph metrics based on a predefined polling interval, see Using a predefined polling interval, on this page. For the procedure about collecting this performance data manually, see Using a custom polling interval.
TMM CPU Usage
For these graph metrics, there is no predefined polling interval for this MIB; therefore, you must choose a polling interval and perform the calculations manually. To perform the calculations, you use the MIB sysStatTm. For more information, see Using a custom polling interval.
The sysMultiHostCpu and sysGlobalHostCpu MIBs include some special CPU usage ratio OIDs that cause the BIG-IP system to automatically calculate graph metrics for you. The particular CPU usage ratio OID that you use is based on a predefined polling interval that you want the BIG-IP system to use when performing the calculation: five seconds, one minute, or five minutes. Specifically, a CPU usage ratio OID:
The sysMultiHostCpu usage ratio OIDs available for you to use are:
sysMultiHostCpuUsageRatio (uses a 5-second polling interval)
sysMultiHostCpuUsageRatio5s (also uses a 5-second polling interval)
sysMultiHostCpuUsageRatio1m (uses a 1-minute polling interval)
sysMultiHostCpuUsageRatio5m (uses a 5-minute polling interval)
The sysGlobalHostCpu usage ratio OIDs available for you to use are:
sysGlobalHostCpuUsageRatio (uses a 5-second polling interval)
sysGlobalHostCpuUsageRatio5s (also uses a 5-second polling interval)
sysGlobalHostCpuUsageRatio1m (uses a 1-minute polling interval)
sysGlobalHostCpuUsageRatio5m (uses a 5-minute polling interval)
Table 11.12 shows the individual OIDS that the BIG-IP system polls for CPU[0-n] graph metrics, based on 5-second, 1-minute, or 5-minute intervals. Note that for each polling interval, the MIB also includes the pertinent CPU usage ratio OID or OIDs that you use to initiate the automatic polling and resulting delta calculations.
Table 11.12 Required OIDs for automatic collection of CPU[0-n] graph metrics
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Graph Metric
sysMultiHostCpuUser5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.12)
sysMultiHostCpuNice5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.13)
sysMultiHostCpuSystem5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.14)
sysMultiHostCpuIdle5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.15)
sysMultiHostCpuIrq5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.16)
sysMultiHostCpuSoftirq5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.17)
sysMultiHostCpuIowait5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.18)
sysMultiHostCpuUsageRatio5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.19)
sysMultiHostCpuUsageRatio (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.11)
sysMultiHostCpuUser1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.20)
sysMultiHostCpuNice1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.21)
sysMultiHostCpuSystem1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.22)
sysMultiHostCpuIdle1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.23)
sysMultiHostCpuIrq 1m(.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.24)
sysMultiHostCpuSoftirq1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.25
sysMultiHostCpuIowait1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.26)
sysMultiHostCpuUsageRatio1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.26)
sysMultiHostCpuUse5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.28)
sysMultiHostCpuNice5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.29)
sysMultiHostCpuSystem5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.30)
sysMultiHostCpuIdle5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.31)
sysMultiHostCpuIrq5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.32
sysMultiHostCpuSoftirq5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.33)
sysMultiHostCpuIowait5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.34)
sysMultiHostCpuUsageRatio5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.35)
Table 11.13 shows the individual OIDS that the BIG-IP system polls for Global Host CPU Usage graph metrics, based on five-second, 1-minute, or 5-minute intervals. Note that for each polling interval, the MIB also includes the pertinent CPU usage ratio OID or OIDs that you use to initiate the automatic polling and resulting delta calculations.
Table 11.13 Required OIDs for automatic collection of Global Host CPU Usage graph metrics
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Graph Metric
Gobal Host CPU Usage
sysGlobalHostCpuUser5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.14)
sysGlobalHostCpuNice5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.15)
sysGlobalHostCpuSystem5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.16)
sysGlobalHostCpuIdle5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.17)
sysGlobalHostCpuIrq5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.18)
sysGlobalHostCpuSoftirq5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.19)
sysGlobalHostCpuIowait5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.20)
sysGlobalHostCpuUsageRatio5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.21)
sysGlobalHostCpuUsageRatio (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.13)
sysGlobalHostCpuUser1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.22)
sysGlobalHostCpuNice1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.23)
sysGlobalHostCpuSystem1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.24)
sysGlobalHostCpuIdle1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.25)
sysGlobalHostCpuIrq1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.26)
sysGlobalHostCpuSoftirq1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.27)
sysGlobalHostCpuIowait1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.28)
sysGlobalHostCpuUsageRatio1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.29)
sysGlobalHostCpuUser5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.30)
sysGlobalHostCpuNice5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.31)
sysGlobalHostCpuSystem5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.32)
sysGlobalHostCpuIdle5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.33)
sysGlobalHostCpuIrq5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.34)
sysGlobalHostCpuSoftirq5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.35)
sysGlobalHostCpuIowait5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.36)
sysGlobalHostCpuUsageRatio5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.37)
The sysMultiHostCpu and sysGlobalHostCpu MIBs include additional OIDs that you can use to calculate CPU performance data based on a custom polling interval, that is, a polling interval that you choose. Using a custom polling interval requires you to poll each individual OID twice at an interval of your choice, calculate the delta of the two polls, and then perform a calculation according to a predefined formula.
Table 11.14 includes a list of OIDs to use when collecting CPU performance data with a custom polling interval. Included are the OIDs for polling for TMM CPU usage graph metrics, based on five-second, 1-minute, or 5-minute intervals.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Graph Metric
sysMultiHostCpuUser (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.4)
sysMultiHostCpuNice (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.5)
sysMultiHostCpuSystem (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.6)
sysMultiHostCpuIdle (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.7)
sysMultiHostCpuIrq (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.8)
sysMultiHostCpuSoftirq (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.9)
sysMultiHostCpuIowait (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.10)
Global Host CPU Usage
sysGlobalHostCpuCount (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.4)
sysGlobalHostActiveCpu (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.5)
sysGlobalHostCpuUser (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.6)
sysGlobalHostCpuNice (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.7)
sysGlobalHostCpuSystem (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.8)
sysGlobalHostCpuIdle (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.9)
sysGlobalHostCpuIrq (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.10)
sysGlobalHostCpuSoftirq (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.11)
sysGlobalHostCpuIowait (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.20.12)
sysStatTmTotalCycles (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.41)
sysStatTmIdleCycles (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.42)
sysStatTmSleepCycles (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.43)
sysTmmStatTmUsageRatio5s (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.8.2.3.1.37.[tmm_id])
sysTmmStatTmUsageRatio1m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.8.2.3.1.38.[tmm_id])
sysTmmStatTmUsageRatio5m (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.8.2.3.1.39.[tmm_id]
Note: TMM IDs within the TMM CPU usage OIDs are used to index the SysTmmStatEntry table. These TMM IDs vary by platform. An example of an OID for sysTmmStatTmUsageRatio5s is .1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.8.2.3.1.37.3.48.46.49.
1.
Poll the OID sysMultiHostCpuUser (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.5.2.1.4) twice, at a 10-second interval.
This results in two values, <sysMultiHostCpuUser1> and <sysMultiHostCpuUser2>.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
(<DeltaCpuUser> + <DeltaCpuNice> + <DeltaCpuSystem>) / (<DeltaCpuUser> + <DeltaCpuNice> + <Delta CpuIdle> + <DeltaCpuSystem> + <DeltaCpuIrq> + <DeltaCpuSoftirq> + <DeltaCpuIowait>) *100
(<DeltaCpuUser> + <DeltaCpuNice> + <DeltaCpuSystem>) / (<DeltaCpuUser> + <DeltaCpuNice> + <Delta CpuIdle> + <DeltaCpuSystem> + <DeltaCpuIrq> + <DeltaCpuSoftirq> + <DeltaCpuIowait>) *100
((<DeltaTmTotalCycles> - (<DeltaTmIdleCycles> + <DeltaTmSleepCycles>)) / <DeltaTmTotalCycles>) *100
You can use SNMP commands with an OID to gather and interpret data on SSL performance, in terms of transactions per second.
Next, you must repeat the first two steps at some time interval (such as ten seconds) from the first two polls. Again, you add the two poll values together.
Table 11.16 shows the OID that you must poll, retrieving two separate poll values for this OID.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
1.
Poll the OID sysClientsslStatTotNativeConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.9.6).
2.
Poll the OID sysClientsslStatTotCompatConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.9.9).
3.
Add the two values together.
This results in the value sysClientsslStatTotConns1.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
5.
Again, add the two values together.
This results in the value sysClientsslStatTotConns2.
<DeltaClientsslStatTotConns> = <sysClientsslStatTotConns2> - <sysClientsslStatTotConns1>
7.
Calculate the actual value of the SSL TPS graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 11.17. An example of the <interval> value is 10.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
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