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Manual Chapter: Configuring SNMP
Manual Chapter
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14 
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an industry-standard protocol that gives a standard SNMP management system the ability to remotely manage a device on the network. One of the devices that an SNMP management system can manage is a BIG-IP® system. The SNMP versions that the BIG-IP system supports are: SNMP v1, SNMP v2c, and SNMP v3. The BIG-IP system implementation of SNMP is based on a well-known SNMP package, Net-SNMP, which was formerly known as UCD-SNMP.
A standard SNMP implementation consists of an SNMP manager, which runs on a management system and makes requests to a device, and an SNMP agent, which runs on the managed device and fulfills those requests. SNMP device management is based on the standard management information base (MIB) known as MIB-II, as well as object IDs and MIB files.
The MIB defines the standard objects that you can manage for a device, presenting those objects in a hierarchical, tree structure.
Each object defined in the MIB has a unique object ID (OID), written as a series of integers. An OID indicates the location of the object within the MIB tree.
A set of MIB files resides on both the SNMP manager system and the managed device. MIB files specify values for the data objects defined in the MIB. This set of MIB files consists of standard SNMP MIB files and enterprise MIB files. Enterprise MIB files are those MIB files that pertain to a particular company, such as F5 Networks, Inc.
Typical SNMP tasks that an SNMP manager performs include polling for data about a device, receiving notifications from a device about specific events, and modifying writable object data.
To comply with the standard SNMP implementation, the BIG-IP system includes both an SNMP agent, a set of standard SNMP MIB files, and a set of enterprise MIB files (those that are specific to the BIG-IP system). The enterprise MIB files typically reside on both the BIG-IP system and the system running the SNMP manager. You can use the browser-based Configuration utility to download the enterprise MIB files to your SNMP manager.
The last item in the list refers to the ability of an SNMP manager system to enable or disable various BIG-IP system objects such as virtual servers and nodes. Specifically, you can use SNMP to:
Set a node to an up or down state
Set a pool member to an up or down state
Before an SNMP manager system can manage a BIG-IP system remotely, you must perform a few configuration tasks on the BIG-IP system, using the BIG-IP systems Configuration utility. After you have performed these configuration tasks, you can use standard SNMP commands on the remote manager system to manage the BIG-IP system.
Configuring the SNMP agent
There are a number of things you can do to configure the SNMP agent on the BIG-IP system. For example, you can allow client access to information that the SNMP agent collects, and you can configure the way that the SNMP agent handles SNMP traps. Traps are definitions of unsolicited notification messages that the BIG-IP alert system and the SNMP agent send to the SNMP manager when certain events occur. You can also configure a self IP address on the BIG-IP system to allow SNMP monitoring of the SNMP agent.
Downloading MIB files
You can download two sets of MIB files to your remote manager system: the standard SNMP MIB files and the enterprise MIB files.
To configure the SNMP agent on the BIG-IP system, you can use the Configuration utility. Configuring the SNMP agent means performing the following tasks:
Configuring BIG-IP system information
Specify a system contact name and the location of the BIG-IP system.
Configuring client access to the SNMP agent
Configure the BIG-IP system to allow access to the SNMP agent from an SNMP manager system.
Controlling access to SNMP data
Assign access levels to SNMP communities or users, to control access to SNMP data.
Configuring Traps
Enable or disable traps and specify the destination SNMP manager system for SNMP traps.
An alternative way to configure the SNMP agent is by editing certain BIG-IP system configuration files directly. These files are:
/config/snmp/snmpd.conf
This file contains most of the configuration information for the SNMP agent, including trap information.
/config/net-snmp/snmpd.conf
Required for SNMP v3 only, this file contains SNMP user names.
Important: You must stop the snmpd service prior to editing this file.
/etc/hosts.allow
This file contains the IP addresses and netmasks for the manager systems that are allowed access to the BIG-IP system.
Note: Only users with the Administrator user role can configure SNMP on the BIG-IP system.
Warning: You should attempt to edit these files directly only if you are an advanced BIG-IP system administrator. Also, do not attempt to configure any bigdb database keys that correspond to SNMP. Doing so could harm your system.
Contact Information
The contact information is a MIB-II simple string variable defined by almost all SNMP boxes. The contact name usually contains a user name, as well as an email address.
Machine Location
The machine location is a MIB-II variable that almost all machines support. It is a simple string that defines the location of the machine.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand System, and click SNMP.
This opens the SNMP Agent Configuration screen.
2.
In the Global Setup area, fill in the boxes.
For more information, see the online help.
3.
Click Update.
An SNMP client refers to any system running the SNMP manager software for the purpose of remotely managing the BIG-IP system. To set up client access to the BIG-IP system, you specify the IP or network addresses (with netmask as required) from which the SNMP agent can accept requests. (By default, SNMP is enabled only for the BIG-IP system loopback interface, 127.0.0.1.)
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand System, and click SNMP.
This opens the SNMP Agent Configuration screen.
2.
For the Client Allow List Type setting, select Host or Network, depending on whether the IP address you specify is a host system or a subnet.
In the Address box, type an IP address or network address from which the SNMP agent can accept requests.
If you selected Network in step 3, type the netmask in the Mask box.
4.
Click the Add button to add the host or network address to the list of allowed clients.
5.
Click Update.
Not only can you configure client access to the SNMP agent on the BIG-IP system, but you can configure the BIG-IP system to enable a client to monitor the SNMP agent.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand Network, and click Self IPs.
The Self IPs screen opens.
2.
If you have not configured the self IP address that you will use for monitoring the SNMP agent, click the Create button. Otherwise, in the IP Address column, click a self IP address.
3.
From the Port Lockdown menu, select Allow Custom.
This displays the Custom List setting.
4.
Click UDP.
5.
Click Port, and in the box, type 161 (the well-known port number for SNMP).
6.
Click Add.
The port number appears in the UDP box.
7.
Click Finished or Update.
There is a default access level for communities, and this access level is read-only. This means that you cannot write to an individual data object that has a read/write access type until you change the default read-only access level of the community or user.
The way to modify this default access level is by using the Configuration utility to grant read/write access to either a community (for SNMP v1 and v2c) or a user (SNMP v3), for a given OID.
When you set the access level of a community or user to read/write, and an individual data object has a read-only access type, access to the object remains read-only. In short, the access level or type that is the most secure takes precedence when there is a conflict. Table 14.1 illustrates this point.
And you set the access level of a community or user to...
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand System, and click SNMP.
This opens the SNMP Agent Configuration screen.
2.
From the Agent menu, choose Access (v1, v2c).
This displays the SNMP Access screen.
3.
In the upper-right corner of the screen, click Create.
This displays the New Access Record screen.
5.
In the Community box, type the name of the SNMP community for which you are assigning an access level (in step 9).
6.
In the Source box, type the source IP address.
7.
In the OID box, type the OID for the top-most node of the SNMP tree to which the access applies.
8.
For the Access setting, select an access level, either Read Only or Read/Write. (This access level applies to the community name you specified in step 6.)
9.
Click Finished.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand System, and click SNMP.
This opens the SNMP Agent Configuration screen.
2.
From the Agent menu, choose Access (v3).
This displays the SNMP Access screen.
3.
In the upper-right corner of the screen, click Create.
This displays the New Access Record screen.
4.
In the User Name box, type a user name for which you are assigning an access level (in step 9).
5.
For the Authentication setting, select a type of authentication to use, and then type and confirm the users password.
6.
For the Privacy setting, select a privacy protocol, and then do one of the following:
Click the Use Authentication Password box.
7.
In the OID box, type the object identifier (OID) for the top-most node of the SNMP tree to which the access applies.
8.
For the Access setting, select an access level, either Read Only or Read/Write. (This access level applies to the user name that you specified in step 5.)
9.
Click Finished.
When you use the Configuration utility to assign an access level to a community or user, the utility updates the snmpd.conf file, assigning only a single access setting to the community or user. There might be times, however, when you want to configure more sophisticated access control. To do this, you must edit the /config/snmp/snmpd.conf file directly, instead of using the Configuration utility.
For example, Figure 14.1 shows a sample snmpd.conf file when you use the Configuration utility to grant read/write access to a community.
Figure 14.1 Sample access-control assignments in the snmpd.conf file
In this example, the string rocommunity identifies a community named public as having the default read only access level (indicated by the strings ro and default). This read only access level prevents any allowed SNMP manager in community public from modifying a data object, even if the object has an access type of read/write.
The string rwcommunity identifies a community named public1 as having a read/write access level (indicated by the string rw). This read/write access level allows any allowed SNMP manager in community public1 to modify a data object under the tree node.1.2.6.1.4.1.3375.2.2.10.1 (ltmVirtualServ) on the local host 127.0.0.1, if that data object has an access type of read/write.
On the BIG-IP system, traps are definitions of unsolicited notification messages that the BIG-IP alert system and the SNMP agent send to the SNMP manager when certain events occur on the BIG-IP system. Configuring SNMP traps on a BIG-IP system means configuring the way that the BIG-IP system handles traps, as well as setting the destination for notifications that the alert system and the SNMP agent send to an SNMP manager.
/etc/alertd/alert.conf
Contains default SNMP traps.

Important: Do not add or remove traps from the /etc/alertd/alert.conf file.
/config/user_alert.conf
Contains user-defined SNMP traps.
You use the Configuration utility to configure traps, that is, enable traps and set trap destinations. When you configure traps, the BIG-IP system automatically updates the alert.conf and user_alert.conf file.
You can configure the SNMP agent on the BIG-IP system to send, or refrain from sending, notifications when the following events occur:
The BIG-IP system receives an authentication warning, generated when a client system attempts to access the SNMP agent. By default, this trap is disabled.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand System, and click SNMP.
This opens the SNMP Agent Configuration screen.
2.
From the Traps menu, choose Configuration.
This displays the SNMP Trap Configuration screen.
3.
6.
Click Update.
In addition to enabling certain traps for certain events, you must specify the destination SNMP manager to which the BIG-IP system should send notifications. For SNMP versions 1 and 2c only, you specify a destination system by providing the community name to which the BIG-IP system belongs, the IP address of the SNMP manager, and the target port number of the SNMP manager.
Important: If you are using SNMP V3 and want to configure a trap destination, you do not use the SNMP screens within the Configuration utility. Instead, you configure the snmpd.conf file. For more information, see the man page for the snmpd.conf file.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand System, and click SNMP.
This opens the SNMP Agent Configuration screen.
2.
From the Traps menu, choose Destination.
This displays the SNMP Destination screen.
3.
In the upper-right corner of the screen, click Create.
This displays the New Trap Record screen.
4.
For the Version setting, select an SNMP version number.
5.
In the Community box, type the community name for the SNMP agent running on the BIG-IP system.
6.
In the Destination box, type the IP address of the SNMP management system.
7.
In the Port box, type the SNMP management system port number that is to receive the traps.
8.
Click Finished.
As described earlier, MIB files define the SNMP data objects contained in the SNMP MIB. There are two sets of MIB files that typically reside on the BIG-IP system and the SNMP manager system: enterprise MIB files (that is, F5-specific MIB files) and standard SNMP MIB files.
Both sets of MIB files are already present on the BIG-IP system, in the directory /usr/share/snmp/mibs. However, you still need to download them to your SNMP manager system. You can download these MIB files from the Welcome screen of the browser-based Configuration utility. For more information, see Downloading SNMP MIB files on this page.
The implementation of the Packet Velocity® ASIC (PVA) feature affects the ability for users to use MIB-II to gather certain kinds of data. For example, with a PVA system, you can use MIB-II to collect statistics on physical system interfaces, but not on logical interfaces (that is, VLANs).
To make MIB-II as clear as possible, we have implemented the SNMP feature so that you use MIB-II for gathering standard operating system data only. You cannot use MIB-II to gather data that is specific to the BIG-IP system and instead must use the F5 enterprise MIB files. All OIDS for BIG-IP system data are contained in the F5 enterprise MIB files, including all interface statistics (1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.2.4 (sysNetwork.sysInterfaces)).
Note: All BIG-IP system statistics are defined by 64-bit counters. Thus, because only SNMP v2c supports 64-bit counters, your management system needs to use SNMP v2c to query BIG-IP system statistics data.
F5-BIGIP-COMMON-MIB.txt
This MIB file contains common information and all notifications (traps). For more information, see Using the F5-BIGIP-COMMON-MIB.txt file.
F5-BIGIP-LOCAL-MIB.txt
This is an enterprise MIB file that contains specific information for properties associated with specific BIG-IP system features related to local traffic management (such as virtual servers, pools, and SNATs). For more information, see Using the F5-BIGIP-LOCAL-MIB.txt file.
F5-BIGIP-SYSTEM-MIB.txt.
The F5-BIGIP-SYSTEM-MIB.txt MIB file includes global information on system-specific objects. For more information, see Using the F5-BIGIP-SYSTEM-MIB.txt file.
To view the set of standard SNMP MIB files that you can download to the SNMP manager system, list the contents of the BIG-IP system directory /usr/share/snmp/mibs.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand Overview, and click Welcome.
This opens the Welcome screen.
3.
Click the type of MIB files to download.
The two MIB file types are F5 MIB files and Net-SNMP MIB files.
Once you have downloaded all of the necessary MIB files, you should familiarize yourself with the contents of the enterprise MIBs, for purposes of managing the BIG-IP system and troubleshooting BIG-IP system events.
Note: To manage a BIG-IP system with SNMP, you need to use the standard set of SNMP commands. For information on SNMP commands, consult your favorite third-party SNMP documentation, or visit the web site http://net-snmp.sourceforge.net.
As mentioned in Downloading SNMP MIB files, the BIG-IP system includes a set of enterprise MIB files:
These MIB files contain information that you can use for your remote management station to: poll the SNMP agent for BIG-IP system-specific information, receive BIG-IP system-specific notifications, or set BIG-IP system data.
The F5-BIGIP-COMMON-MIB.txt file is an enterprise MIB file that contains objects pertaining to any common information, as well as the F5-specific SNMP traps.
All F5-specific traps are contained within this MIB file. You can identify the traps within this MIB file by viewing the file and finding object names that show the designation NOTIFICATION-TYPE.
When an F5-specific trap sends a notification to the SNMP manager system, the SNMP manager system receives a text message describing the event or problem that has occurred. For troubleshooting assistance regarding F5-specific traps, see Appendix A, Troubleshooting SNMP Traps.
To see all available MIB objects in this MIB file, you can view the F5-BIGIP-COMMON-MIB.txt file in the directory /usr/share/snmp/mibs on the BIG-IP system.
The F5-BIGIP-LOCAL-MIB.txt file is an enterprise MIB file that contains information that an SNMP manager system can access for the purpose of managing local application traffic. For example, you can:
In general, you can use this MIB file to get information on any local traffic management object (virtual servers, pools, nodes, profiles, SNATs, health monitors, and iRules). You can also reset statistics for any of these objects.
To see all available enterprise MIB objects for local traffic management, you can view the F5-BIGIP-LOCAL-MIB.txt file in the directory /usr/share/snmp/mibs on the BIG-IP system.
The F5-BIGIP-SYSTEM-MIB.txt file is an enterprise MIB file that describes objects representing common BIG-IP system information. Examples of information in this MIB file are global statistic data, network information, and platform information. Some of the data in this MIB file is similar to that defined in MIB-II, but is not exactly the same.
Table 14.2 shows standard MIB-II objects and the F5-specific objects that approximately correspond to them.
To see all available enterprise MIB system objects, you can view the F5-BIGIP-SYSTEM-MIB.txt file in the directory /usr/share/snmp/mibs on the BIG-IP system.
One of the MIB files that the BIG-IP system provides is the Remote network Monitoring (RMON) MIB file, RMON-MIB.txt. This file is the standard RMON MIB file. However, the implementation of RMON on the BIG-IP system differs slightly from the standard RMON implementation, in these ways:
The BIG-IP system implementation of RMON supports four of the nine RMON groups. The four supported RMON groups are: statistics, history, alarms, and events.
The RMON-MIB.txt file monitors the BIG-IP system interfaces (that is, sysIfIndex), and not the standard operating system interfaces.
For hardware reasons, the packet-length-specific statistics in the RMON statistics group offer combined transmission and receiving statistics only. This behavior differs from the behavior described in the definitions of the corresponding object IDs.
To understand how RMON operates for a BIG-IP system, you can view the RMON-MIB.txt file in the directory /usr/share/snmp/mibs on the BIG-IP system.
The Configuration utility on the BIG-IP system displays graphs showing performance metrics for the system. However, you can also use SNMP to collect the same information.
Each type of metric has one or more SNMP object IDs (OIDs) associated with it. To gather performance data, you specify these OIDs with the appropriate SNMP command.
For example, the following SNMP command collects data on current memory use, where public is the community name and bigip is the host name of the BIG-IP system:
For some types of metrics, such as memory use, simply issuing an SNMP command with an OID gives you the information you need. For other types of metrics, the data that you collect with SNMP is not useful until you perform a calculation on it to interpret the data.
For example, to determine the throughput rate of client bits coming into the BIG-IP system, you must you must use the relevant OID (sysStatClientBytesIn (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.3)) to take two polls at a certain interval (such as ten seconds), calculate the delta of the two polls, and then perform the following calculation on that delta value:
Important: For calculations that include a polling interval, the interval can be any amount of time that you choose, as long as you use that same number as the value for <interval> in your calculations. Note that the performance graphs that the Configuration utility displays are based on a polling interval of ten seconds.
The calculations that you must perform to interpret the performance data that you collect (not required for interpreting data on memory use and active connections).
You can use an SNMP command with OIDs to gather data on the number of bytes of memory currently being used on the BIG-IP system. Table 14.3 shows the OIDs that you need to specify to gather data on current memory use. To interpret data on memory use, you do not need to perform a calculation on the collected data.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
You can use SNMP commands with various OIDs to gather data on the number of active connections on the BIG-IP system. Table 14.4 shows the OIDs that you need to specify to gather data on active connections. To interpret data on active connections, you do not need to perform any calculations on the collected data.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Active Connections
(summary graph)
Active Connections
(detailed graph)
You can use SNMP commands with various OIDs to gather and interpret data on the number of new connections on the BIG-IP system.
Table 14.5 shows the individual OIDS that you must poll to retrieve two separate poll values for each OID.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
New Connections
(summary graph)
Total New Connections
(detailed graph)
New PVA Connections
(detailed graph)
New Client SSL Profile Connections
(detailed graph)
sysClientsslStatTotNativeConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.9.6) sysClientsslStatTotCompatConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.9.9)
sysServersslStatTotNativeConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.10.6) sysServersslStatTotCompatConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.10.9)
New Accepts/Connects
(detailed graph)
For example, to collect data for the Client Accepts graph metric, follow these steps.
1.
Poll OID sysTcpStatAccepts (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.12.6) twice, at a 10-second interval.
This results in two values, <sysTcpStatAccepts1> and <sysTcpStatAccepts2>.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
3.
Calculate the value of the Client Accepts graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 14.6 (<DeltaTcpStatAccepts> / <interval>), where the value of <interval> is 10.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
New Connections
(summary graph)
Total New Connections
(detailed graph)
New PVA Connections
(detailed graph)
New SSL Connections
(detailed graph)
(<DeltaClientsslStatTotNativeConns> + <DeltaClientsslStatTotCompatConns>) / <interval>
(<DeltaServersslStatTotNativeConns> + <DeltaServersslStatTotCompatConns>) / <interval>
New Accepts/Connects
(detailed graph)
You can use SNMP commands with various OIDs to gather and interpret data on the throughput rate on the BIG-IP system, in terms of bits per second.
Table 14.7 shows the individual OIDS that you must poll, retrieving two separate poll values for each OID.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Throughput
(summary graph)
sysStatClientBytesIn (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.3) sysStatClientBytesOut (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.5)
sysStatServerBytesIn (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.10) sysStatServerBytesOut (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.12)
Throughput
(detailed graph)
For example, to collect data on throughput rates for the Server Bits In graph metric, follow these steps.
1.
Poll OID sysStatServerBytesIn (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.10) twice, at a 10-second interval.
This results in two values, <sysStatServerBytesIn1> and <sysStatServerBytesIn2>.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
3.
Calculate the value of the Server Bits In graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 14.8 (<DeltaStatServerBytesIn> / <interval>), where the value of <interval> is 10.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Throughput
(summary graph)
Throughput
(detailed graph)
You can use SNMP commands with an OID to gather and interpret data on the number of current HTTP requests on the BIG-IP system, in terms of requests per second.
Table 14.9 shows the OID that you must poll, retrieving two separate poll values for this OID.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
For example, to collect data on HTTP requests for the HTTP Requests graph metric, follow these steps.
1.
Poll OID sysStatHttpRequests (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.56) twice, at a 10-second interval.
This results in two values, <sysStatHttpRequests1> and <sysStatHttpRequests2>.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
3.
Calculate the value of the HTTP Requests graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 14.10, where the value of <interval> is 10.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
Table 14.11 shows the individual OIDS that you must use to poll for RAM Cache data.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
sysHttpStatRamcacheHits (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.46) sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.47)
sysHttpStatRamcacheHitBytes (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.49) sysHttpStatRamcacheMissBytes (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.50)
sysHttpStatRamcacheEvictions (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.54) sysHttpStatRamcacheHits (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.46) sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.47)
For example, to collect data on RAM Cache use for the Hit Rate graph metric, follow these steps.
1.
Poll the OID sysHttpStatRamcacheHits (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.46). This results in a value of <sysHttpStatRamcacheHits1>.
2.
Poll the OID sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.4.47). This results in a value of <sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses1>.
3.
Calculate the value of the Hit Rate graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 14.12 (<sysHttpStatRamcacheHits1> / (<sysHttpStatRamcacheHits1> + <sysHttpStatRamcacheMisses1>) *100).
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
<sysHttpStatRamcacheHitBytes1> / (<sysHttpStatRamcacheHitBytes1> + <sysHttpStatRamcacheMissBytes1> ) *100
You can use SNMP commands with various OIDs to gather and interpret data on CPU use on the BIG-IP system. Specifically, you can gather and interpret data for two different graph metrics: TMM CPU Usage and CPU[0-n].
Table 14.13 shows the individual OIDS that you must poll, retrieving two separate poll values for each OID.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
sysHostCpuUser (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.2.2.1.3)
sysHostCpuNice (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.2.2.1.4)
sysHostCpuIdle (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.2.2.1.5)
sysHostCpuSystem (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.2.2.1.6)
sysHostCpuIrq (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.2.2.1.7)
sysHostCpuSoftirq (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.2.2.1.8)
sysHostCpuIowait (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.2.2.1.9)
sysStatTmTotalCycles (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.41)
sysStatTmIdleCycles (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.42)
sysStatTmSleepCycles (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.1.43)
For example, to collect data for the CPU[0-n] graph metric, follow these steps.
1.
Poll the OID sysHostCpuUser (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.7.2.2.1.3 twice, at a 10-second interval.
This results in two values, <sysHostCpuUser1> and <sysHostCpuUser2>.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
4.
Calculate the value of the CPU[0-n] graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 14.14.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
(<DeltaCpuUser> + <DeltaCpuNice> + <DeltaCpuSystem>) / (<DeltaCpuUser> + <DeltaCpuNice> + <Delta CpuIdle> + <DeltaCpuSystem> + <DeltaCpuIrq> + <DeltaCpuSoftirq> + <DeltaCpuIowait>) *100
((<DeltaTmTotalCycles> - (<DeltaTmIdleCycles> + <DeltaTmSleepCycles>)) / <DeltaTmTotalCycles>) *100
You can use SNMP commands with an OID to gather and interpret data on SSL performance, in terms of transactions per second.
Next, you must repeat the first two steps at some time interval (such as ten seconds) from the first two polls. Again, you add the two poll values together.
Table 14.15 shows the OID that you must poll, retrieving two separate poll values for this OID.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
For example, to collect data on SSL transactions for the SSL TPS graph metric, follow these steps.
1.
Poll the OID sysClientsslStatTotNativeConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.9.6).
2.
Poll the OID sysClientsslStatTotCompatConns (.1.3.6.1.4.1.3375.2.1.1.2.9.9).
3.
Add the two values together.
This results in the value sysClientsslStatTotConns1.
Note: Although this example uses an interval of ten seconds, the interval can actually be any duration that you choose.
5.
Again, add the two values together.
This results in the value sysClientsslStatTotConns2.
<DeltaClientsslStatTotConns> = <sysClientsslStatTotConns2> - <sysClientsslStatTotConns1>
7.
Calculate the actual value of the SSL TPS graph metric using the calculation shown in Table 14.16. An example of the <interval> value is 10.
Performance Graph
(Configuration utility)
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