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Manual Chapter: Configuring bigdb Database Keys
Manual Chapter
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Every BIG-IP® system includes a bigdb database. The bigdb database holds a set of bigdb configuration keys, which define the behavior of various aspects of the BIG-IP system. For example, the bigdb key Failover.Active Mode, when set to enable, causes a redundant system to operate in active-active mode, instead of the default active/standby mode.
The Configuration utility
When you use the Configuration utility to configure various BIG-IP features, you are actually resetting bigdb key values. In this case, the bigdb keys are invisible to users.
The bigpipe db command
You can reset bigdb key values directly using the bigpipe db command. This command is useful if you prefer not to use the Configuration utility to configure a BIG-IP feature, or if configuration of a particular aspect of BIG-IP system behavior is not available through the Configuration utility. The syntax for displaying and setting bigdb keys is:
Tip: For more information on using the bigpipe db command, see the online man page for the command.
Some of the bigdb database keys for system management that you might want to configure pertain specifically to redundant systems and user accounts.
There are several bigdb keys that you can use to configure and manage a redundant system. These keys pertain to the following redundant-system features:
Enables or disables active-active mode. Use active-active mode if set to 1. By default, this is 0 (off) and active/standby mode is used. Possible values are enable and disable.
Specifies the file into which the sod service logs the failover debug information.
For an active-active system, when the failed unit becomes active again, specifies the number of seconds that you want the system to wait before failback occurs.
Controls whether a standby unit with a failover condition becomes active when the peer unit fails. Possible values are enable and disable.
Specifies that the failover daemon should always attempt to become the active unit. Possible values are enable and disable.
Specifies that the failover daemon should switch to a standby state whenever the current unit senses that its peer is alive. Possible values are enable and disable.
Defines whether the BIG-IP system is a unit of a redundant pair. Possible values are true and false.
If using active-active mode, specifies that the system should wait until the surviving unit receives a command before surrendering resources to a rebooted machine. Possible values are enable and disable.
Specifies whether the system should use the network as a backup to, or instead of, the hard-wired connection for failover. Possible values are 0 (off) and 1 (on).
Specifies that the failover daemon (/sbin/sod) should write the state of its connection (hard-wired or network) to its peer. The system writes this information to the failover daemon's debug log file. Possible values are enable and disable.
Defines the amount of time in tenths of seconds that the systems interfaces are down before switching to a standby state. For example, a value of 50 represents 5 seconds.
Specifies the ID of the unit. Each BIG-IP system must have a unique unit ID of 1 or 2 in the event that network communication is not possible with its peer.
Specifies that the failover daemon should use /dev/tty00 for hard-wired failover. Possible values are enable and disable.
Specifies that the failover daemon should use /dev/tty01 for hard-wired failover. Possible values are enable and disable.
The bigdb keys that you can configure for connection mirroring are shown in Table B.2. These keys are listed in alphabetical order.
Defines whether connection mirroring is enabled or disabled for a redundant system. Possible values are enable and disable.
The bigdb keys that you can configure for synchronizing configuration data are shown in Table B.3. These keys are listed in alphabetical order.
Defines whether the Configuration utility should automatically detect configuration status and display it on all Configuration utility screens. Possible values are enable and disable.
Specifies the date and time that this unit successfully informed its peer of a configuration change on this unit.
-1 - Uninitiated or disabled config state.
0 - Synchronized.
1 - Configuration on current unit was modified. Recommend configuration synchronization to peer unit.
2 - Configuration on peer unit was modified. Recommend configuration synchronization from peer unit.
3 - Configuration modified on both units. Manual intervention required.
The bigdb keys that you can configure for system fail-safe are shown in Table B.4. These keys are listed in alphabetical order.
Specifies the action that the system takes when the switch board fails. Possible values are failover, reboot, and restart_all.
You can configure a set of bigdb keys to manage administrative user accounts for a BIG-IP system. These keys and their descriptions appear in Table B.5, and are listed in alphabetical order.
Specifies fields that the Setup utility populates. Possible values are none, internal, non-production, and production.
root,admin
Specifies those user accounts that must reside locally on the BIG-IP system and therefore cannot reside on a remote authentication server.
The bigdb keys that you can configure to set the minimum log level on local traffic and authentication events are shown in Table B.6. These keys are listed in alphabetical order. For information on all possible key values, see Chapter 16, Logging BIG-IP System Events.
Sets the minimum log level for events related to populating and persisting bigdb database variables.
Sets the minimum log level for events related to ARP packets and the ARP cache. These events include IPv6 neighbor discovery events.
Sets the minimum log level for MCP events related to configuring the Traffic Management Microkernel (TMM).
Sets the minimum log level for events related to packets discarded due to exceptional circumstances, such as bad checksums or unhandled protocol versions.
Sets the minimum log level for events related to TCP, UDP, and FastL4 protocol and packet processing.
You can configure a set of bigdb keys to manage the way that the BIG-IP system handles the compression of HTTP server responses. These keys and their descriptions appear in Table B.7, and are listed in alphabetical order.
Used only when the Compression.Strategy key is set to ratio. This ratio defines how each compressible response is load balanced between compression devices.
Used only when the Compression.Strategy key is set to ratio. This ratio defines how each compressible response is load balanced between compression devices.
speed - The system uses the hardware to the fullest extent possible. The speed value is best used for bulk compression and for limiting CPU overhead.
size - When the key is set to the size value, the system performs as much compression in the software as possible. Normally, the system uses a ratio of TMM and Offload. When both are busy, compression is performed in the hardware. The size value gives the best ratio at the expense of CPU overhead.
ratio - The system uses the three bigdb keys Compression.Hardware.Ratio, Compression.Offload.Ratio, and Compression.TMM.Ratio, with the goal of limiting CPU overhead while giving good compression ratios.
Used only when the Compression.Strategy key is set to ratio. This ratio defines how each compressible response is load balanced between compression devices.
You can fine tune the RAM Cache implementation by changing settings in the bigdb database. We recommend that you change these settings only while under the direction of an F5 support representative. The following bigdb setting is available for the RAM Cache feature.
Defines the percentage of TMM memory that is available to all RAM Cache instances. This means that the RAM Cache size is represented by this statement:
ramcacheprofile1 + ramcacheprofile2 + ramcacheprofile3 must not equal more than Total Memory times the Ramcache.MaxMemoryPercent divided by 100.
Note: Changes to this setting take effect only after restarting the BIG-IP system services, including the TMM service.
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