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Manual Chapter: Configuration Guide for BIG-IP® Local Traffic Management: 2 - Configuring Virtual Servers
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2

Configuring Virtual Servers


Introducing virtual servers

Virtual servers are the most important component of any BIG-IP® local traffic management (LTM) configuration. A virtual server receives a client request, and instead of sending the request directly to the destination IP address specified in the packet header, sends it to any of several content servers that make up a load balancing pool. Virtual servers increase the availability of resources for processing client requests.

Not only do virtual servers distribute traffic across multiple servers, they also treat varying types of traffic differently, depending on your traffic-management needs. For example, a virtual server can enable compression on HTTP request data as it passes through the LTM system, or decrypt and re-encrypt SSL connections and verify SSL certificates. For each type of traffic, such as TCP, UDP, HTTP, SSL, and FTP, a virtual server can apply an entire group of settings, to affect the way that the LTM system manages that traffic type.

A virtual server can also enable session persistence for many different traffic types. Through a virtual server, you can set up session persistence for HTTP, SSL, SIP, and MSRDP connections, to name a few.

Finally, a virtual server can apply an iRule, which is a user-written script designed to inspect and direct individual connections in specific ways. For example, you can create an iRule that searches the content of a TCP connection for a specific string and, if found, directs the virtual server to send the connection to a specific pool or pool member.

To summarize, a virtual server can do the following:

  • Distribute client requests across multiple servers to balance server load
  • Apply various behavioral settings to multiple traffic types
  • Enable persistence for multiple traffic types
  • Direct traffic according to user-written iRulesTM

You can use virtual servers in any of several distinct ways:

  • Directing traffic to a load balancing pool
    A Standard virtual server (also known as a load balancing virtual server) directs client traffic to a load balancing pool and is the most basic type of virtual server. When you first create the virtual server, you assign an existing default pool to it. From then on, the virtual server automatically directs traffic to that default pool.
  • Sharing an IP address with a VLAN node
    You can set up a Forwarding (Layer 2) virtual server to share the same IP address as a node in an associated VLAN. To do this, you must perform some additional configuration tasks. These tasks consist of: creating a VLAN group that includes the VLAN in which the node resides, assigning a self-IP address to the VLAN group, and disabling the virtual server on the relevant VLAN. For more information, see the chapter that describes VLANs and VLAN groups in the BIG-IP Network and System Management Guide.
    Note that the BIG-IP system automatically associates a Fast L4 profile with this type of virtual server, as a way to increase the speed at which the virtual server processes Layer 4 requests. For more information on the Fast L4 type of profile, see Chapter 5, Understanding Profiles .
  • Forwarding traffic to a specific destination IP address
    A Forwarding (IP) virtual server is just like other virtual servers, except that a forwarding virtual server has no pool members to load balance. The virtual server simply forwards the packet directly to the destination IP address specified in the client request. When you use a forwarding virtual server to direct a request to its originally-specified destination IP address, the LTM system adds, tracks, and reaps these connections just as with other virtual servers. You can also view statistics for a forwarding virtual servers.

    Note that the BIG-IP system automatically associates a Fast L4 profile with this type of virtual server, as a way to increase the speed at which the virtual server processes Layer 4 requests. For more information on the Fast L4 type of profile, see Chapter 5, Understanding Profiles .
  • Increasing the speed of processing HTTP traffic
    A Performance (HTTP) virtual server is a virtual server with which you associate a Fast HTTP profile. Together, the virtual server and profile increase the speed at which the virtual server processes HTTP requests.
  • Increasing the speed of processing Layer 4 traffic
    A Performance (Layer 4) virtual server is a virtual server to which the BIG-IP system automatically associates a Fast L4 profile. Together, the virtual server and Fast L4 profile increase the speed at which the virtual server processes Layer 4 requests. For more information on the Fast L4 type of profile, see Chapter 5, Understanding Profiles .

When you create a virtual server, you specify the pool or pools that you want to serve as the destination for any traffic coming from that virtual server. You also configure its general properties, some configuration options, and other resources you want to assign to it, such as iRules or session persistence types.

The following sections describe the types of virtual servers you can create, as well as their general properties, configuration options, and resources.

Understanding virtual server types

There are two distinct types of virtual servers that you can create: host virtual servers and network virtual servers.

Host virtual servers

A host virtual server represents a specific site, such as an Internet web site or an FTP site, and it load balances traffic targeted to content servers that are members of a pool.

The IP address that you assign to a host virtual server should match the IP address that DNS associates with the site's domain name. When the LTM system receives a connection request for that site, the LTM system recognizes that the client's destination IP address matches the IP address of the virtual server, and subsequently forwards the client request to one of the content servers that the virtual server load balances.

Network virtual servers

A network virtual server is a virtual server whose IP address has no bits set in the host portion of the IP address (that is, the host portion of its IP address is 0). There are two kinds of network virtual servers: those that direct client traffic based on a range of destination IP addresses, and those that direct client traffic based on specific destination IP addresses that the LTM system does not recognize.

Directing traffic for a range of destination IP addresses

With an IP address whose host bit is set to 0, a virtual server can direct client connections that are destined for an entire range of IP addresses, rather than for a single destination IP address (as is the case for a host virtual server). Thus, when any client connection targets a destination IP address that is in the network specified by the virtual server IP address, the LTM system can direct that connection to one or more pools associated with the network virtual server.

For example, the virtual server can direct client traffic that is destined for any of the nodes on the 192.168.1.0 network to a specific load balancing pool such as ingress-firewalls. Or, a virtual server could direct a web connection destined to any address within the subnet 192.168.1.0/24, to the pool default_webservers.

Directing traffic for transparent devices (wildcard virtual servers)

Besides directing client connections that are destined for a specific network or subnet, a network virtual server can also direct client connections that have a specific destination IP address that the virtual server does not recognize, such as a transparent device. This type of network virtual server is known as a wildcard virtual server.

Wildcard virtual servers are a special type of network virtual server designed to manage network traffic that is targeted to transparent network devices. Examples of transparent devices are firewalls, routers, proxy servers, and cache servers. A wildcard virtual server manages network traffic that has a destination IP address unknown to the LTM system.

Handling unrecognized client IP addresses

A host-type of virtual server typically manages traffic for a specific site, When the LTM system receives a connection request for that site, the LTM system recognizes that the client's destination IP address matches the IP address of the virtual server, and it subsequently forwards the client to one of the content servers that the virtual server load balances.

However, when load balancing transparent nodes, the LTM system might not recognize a client's destination IP address. The client might be connecting to an IP address on the other side of the firewall, router, or proxy server. In this situation, the LTM system cannot match the client's destination IP address to a virtual server IP address.

Wildcard network virtual servers solve this problem by not translating the incoming IP address at the virtual server level on the LTM system. For example, when the LTM system does not find a specific virtual server match for a client's destination IP address, the LTM system matches the client's destination IP address to a wildcard virtual server, designated by an IP address of 0.0.0.0. The LTM system then forwards the client's packet to one of the firewalls or routers that the wildcard virtual server load balances, which in turn forwards the client's packet to the actual destination IP address.

Understanding default and port-specific wildcard servers

There are two kinds of wildcard virtual servers that you can create:

  • Default wildcard virtual servers
    A default wildcard virtual server is a wildcard virtual server that uses port 0 and handles traffic for all services. A wildcard virtual server is enabled for all VLANs by default. However, you can specifically disable any VLANs that you do not want the default wildcard virtual server to support. Disabling VLANs for the default wildcard virtual server is done by creating a VLAN disabled list. Note that a VLAN disabled list applies to default wildcard virtual servers only. You cannot create a VLAN disabled list for a wildcard virtual server that is associated with one VLAN only. For the procedure to create a default wildcard server, see Creating a wildcard virtual server .
  • Port-specific wildcard virtual servers
    A port-specific wildcard virtual server handles traffic only for a particular service, and you define it using a service name or a port number. You can use port-specific wildcard virtual servers for tracking statistics for a particular type of network traffic, or for routing outgoing traffic, such as HTTP traffic, directly to a cache server rather than a firewall or router. For the procedure to create a port-specific wildcard virtual server, see To create a port-specific wildcard virtual server .

If you use both a default wildcard virtual server and port-specific wildcard virtual servers, any traffic that does not match either a standard virtual server or one of the port-specific wildcard virtual servers is handled by the default wildcard virtual server.

We recommend that when you define transparent nodes that need to handle more than one type of service, such as a firewall or a router, you specify an actual port for the node and turn off port translation for the virtual server.

Creating multiple wildcard servers

You can define multiple wildcard virtual servers that run simultaneously. Each wildcard virtual server must be assigned to an individual VLAN, and therefore can handle packets for that VLAN only.

In some configurations, you need to set up a wildcard virtual server on one side of the LTM system to load balance connections across transparent devices. You can create another wildcard virtual server on the other side of the LTM system to forward packets to virtual servers receiving connections from the transparent devices and forwarding them to their destination.

Creating and modifying virtual servers

Using the Configuration utility, you can either create a virtual server or modify the settings of an existing virtual server. The following sections contain the procedures for creating and modifying virtual servers. To understand individual virtual server properties and settings, see Configuring virtual server and virtual address settings . For information on viewing existing virtual server configurations, see Managing virtual servers and virtual addresses .

Creating a virtual server

When you create a virtual server, you can create either a host or network virtual server, or a special type of network virtual server called a wildcard virtual server.

Creating a host or network virtual server

You can use the same procedure to create both a host virtual server and a network virtual server. The following procedure creates the most basic host or network virtual server, with all of the default settings. After performing this procedure, you have a load-balancing virtual server that directs traffic to a load balancing pool, using the default settings.

In most cases, creating a basic virtual server satisfies your load balancing or forwarding needs. When you create a basic virtual server, most of the settings are hidden, to simplify the creation process. If you want to adjust other settings beyond the basic ones, you can view and configure more advanced settings. For information on configuring specific settings, see Configuring virtual server and virtual address settings , or see the online help.

Note

In a redundant-system configuration, you cannot create a virtual server for unit 2 unless you have first created a virtual server for unit 1.

To create a host or network virtual server

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    The Virtual Servers screen displays.
  3. On the upper right portion of the screen, click the Create button.
    The New Virtual Server screen opens.
  4. Configure all required settings.
    If you are creating a network virtual server, you must set the host bit of the IP address to 0.
  5. Retain or change the values for any optional settings.
  6. Click Finished
Note

If a virtual server is to have the same IP address as a node in an associated VLAN, you must perform some additional configuration tasks. These tasks consist of: creating a VLAN group that includes the VLAN in which the node resides, assigning self-IP addresses to the VLAN group, and disabling the virtual server on the relevant VLAN. For more information, see the online help pertaining to VLANs.

Creating a wildcard virtual server

A wildcard virtual server is a special type of network virtual server. Creating a wildcard virtual server requires three tasks:

  • First, you must create a pool that contains the addresses of the transparent devices.
  • Next, you must create the wildcard virtual server (default or port-specific).
  • Finally, you must ensure that port translation is disabled for each virtual server. Port translation is disabled by default.

The following procedures describe how to perform these tasks using the Configuration utility.

To create a pool of transparent devices

To create a pool of transparent devices, display the Pools screen and click the Create button. For more information, see Chapter 4, Configuring Load Balancing Pools .

To create a default wildcard virtual server

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    The Virtual Servers screen opens.
  3. On the upper right portion of the screen, click the Create button.
    The New Virtual Server screen opens.
  4. Configure all required settings.
    Remember to type the IP address 0.0.0.0 in the Destination Address box, and if you selected a network type of virtual server, to type the netmask 0.0.0.0 in the Mask box.
  5. Click Finished.

To create a port-specific wildcard virtual server

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    The Virtual Servers screen opens.
  3. On the upper-right portion of the screen, click Create.
    The New Virtual Server screen opens.
  4. In the Address box, type the wildcard IP address 0.0.0.0.
  5. For the Service Port setting, type a port number, or select a service name from the list. Note that port 0 defines a wildcard virtual server that handles all types of services. If you specify a port number, you create a port-specific wildcard virtual server. The wildcard virtual server handles traffic only for the port specified.
  6. For the Default Pool setting in the Resources section, select the pool of transparent devices that you want to apply to the virtual server.
  7. Click Finished.

To turn off port translation for a wildcard virtual server

After you define the wildcard virtual server with a wildcard port, you should verify that port translation is disabled for the virtual server.

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    The Virtual Servers screen opens.
  3. In the Name column, click the virtual server for which you want to turn off port translation.
    The Virtual Servers screen opens.
  4. In the Enable Translation section, verify that the Port box is cleared.

Modifying a virtual server

You can easily modify the settings of an existing virtual server, using the Configuration utility. For information on virtual settings, see Configuring virtual server and virtual address settings or the online help.

To modify an existing virtual server

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    The Virtual Servers screen opens.
  3. In the Name column, click the name of the virtual server that you want to modify.
    The properties screen opens for that virtual server.
  4. From the Configuration list, select Advanced.
  5. In the Configuration section, retain or modify any virtual server settings.
  6. Click Update.
  7. On the menu bar, click Resources.
    The screen displays additional settings for the selected virtual server.
  8. In the Load Balancing section, retain or modify any virtual server resources.
  9. Click Update.
  10. If you want to modify the set of iRules assigned to the virtual server, click the Manage button, and use the left or right arrows (<< or >>) to enable or disable any existing iRules.
  11. Click Finished.

Configuring virtual server and virtual address settings

A virtual server and its virtual server address have a number of properties and settings that you can configure to affect the way that a virtual server manages traffic. You can also assign certain resources to a virtual server, such as a load balancing pool and a persistence profile. Together, these properties, settings, and resources represent the definition of a virtual server or its address, and most have default values. When you create a virtual server, you can either retain the default values or adjust them to suit your needs.

The following sections list and describe all properties, configuration settings, and resources that define virtual servers and virtual addresses.

For information on how to create virtual server, see Creating a host or network virtual server .

Configuring virtual server properties, settings, and resources

In the Configuration utility, virtual server settings are grouped into three categories: General properties, configuration settings (basic and advanced), and resources (basic and advanced). The following sections describe the settings that these three categories contain.

General properties

When you create a virtual server, you define some general properties. Table 2.1 lists and describes these general properties.

Table 2.1 General properties of a virtual server
Property
Description
Default Value
Name
A unique name that you assign to the virtual server. This property is required.
No default value
Destination Type
The type of virtual server you want to create and its IP address. If the type you select is network, then this property also includes the mask for the IP address. For more information on virtual server types, see Understanding virtual server types . This property is required.
Host
Destination Address
The IP address of the virtual server.
No default value
Destination Mask
The netmask for a network virtual server. This property applies to a network virtual server only, and is required. The netmask clarifies whether the host bit is an actual zero or a wildcard representation.
No default value
Service Port
A service name or port number for which you want to direct traffic. This property is required.
No default value
State
The state of the virtual server, that is, enabled or disabled. As an option, you can enable or disable a virtual server for a specific VLAN. Note that when you disable a virtual server, the virtual server no longer accepts new connection requests. However, it allows current connections to finish processing before going to a down state.
Note: If no VLAN is specified, then the enabled or disabled setting applies to all VLANs.
Enabled

 

Configuration settings

When creating a virtual server, you can configure a number of settings. Table 2.2 lists and describes these virtual server configuration settings. Because all of these settings have default values, you are not required to change these settings.

Table 2.2 Configuration settings for a virtual server
Setting
Description
Default Value
Type
The type of virtual server configuration. Choices are: Standard, IP Forwarding (IP), Forwarding (Layer 2), Performance (HTTP), Performance (Layer 4), and Reject. For more information, see Introducing virtual servers . Note that if set to Reject, this setting causes the BIG-IP system to reject any traffic destined for the virtual server IP address.
Standard
Protocol
The network protocol name for which you want the virtual server to direct traffic. Sample protocol names are TCP and UDP.
One benefit of this feature is that you can load balance virtual private network (VPN) client connections across several VPNs, eliminating the possibility of a single point of failure. A typical use of this feature is for load balancing multiple VPN gateways in an IPSEC VPN sandwich, using non-translating virtual servers.
An important point to note is that although address translation of such protocols can be optionally activated, some protocols, such as IPSEC in AH mode, rely on the IP headers remaining unchanged. In such cases, you should use non-translating network virtual servers.
Note that this setting is disabled when creating a Performance (HTTP) type of virtual server.
TCP
Protocol Profile (Client)
A setting that designates the selected profile as a client-side profile. Applies to TCP and UDP connections only. When creating a Performance (HTTP) type of virtual server, this value is set to fasthttp, and you cannot change it. Similarly, when creating a Performance (Layer 4) type of virtual server, this value is set to fastl4, and you cannot change it.
TCP
Protocol Profile (Server)
A setting that designates the selected profile as a server-side profile. Applies to TCP and UDP connections only. Note that this setting does not appear when creating a Performance (HTTP) or Performance (Layer 4) type of virtual server.
(Use Client Profile)
OneConnect Profile
The name of an existing OneConnectTM profile for managing connection persistence. Note that this setting does not appear when creating a Performance (HTTP) or Performance (Layer 4) type of virtual server.
oneconnect
HTTP Profile
The name of an existing HTTP profile for managing HTTP traffic. Note that this setting does not appear when creating a Performance (HTTP) or Performance (Layer 4) type of virtual server.
None
FTP Profile
The name of an existing FTP profile for managing FTP traffic. Note that this setting does not appear when creating a Performance (HTTP) or Performance (Layer 4) type of virtual server.
None
Client SSL Profile
The name of an existing SSL profile for managing client-side SSL traffic. Note that this setting does not appear when creating a Performance (HTTP) or Performance (Layer 4) type of virtual server.
None
Server SSL Profile
The name of an existing SSL profile for managing server-side SSL traffic. Note that this setting does not appear when creating a Performance (HTTP) or Performance (Layer 4) type of virtual server.
None
Authentication Profile
The name of an existing authentication profile for managing an authentication mechanism. Examples are a remote LDAP or RADIUS server. Note that this setting does not appear when creating a Performance (HTTP) or Performance (Layer 4) type of virtual server.
None
Stream Profile
The name of an existing Stream profile for managing Real-Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) traffic. Note that this setting does not appear when creating a Performance (HTTP) or Performance (Layer 4) type of virtual server.
None
Statistics Profile
The name of a statistics profile.
stats
VLAN Traffic
The names of VLANS for which the virtual server is enabled or disabled.
ALL VLANS
Rate Class
The name of an existing rate class, used for enforcing a throughput policy for incoming network traffic.
None
Connection Limit
The maximum number of concurrent connections allowed for the virtual server. Setting this to 0 turns off connection limits.
0
Address Translation
A setting to enable or disable address translation on an LTM system. This option is useful when the LTM system is load balancing devices that have the same IP address. This is typical with the nPath routing configuration where duplicate IP addresses are configured on the loopback device of several servers.
Enabled
Port Translation
A setting to enable or disable port translation on an LTM system. Turning off port translation for a virtual server is useful if you want to use the virtual server to load balance connections to any service.
Enabled
SNAT Pool
The name of an existing SNAT pool, used for implementing selective and intelligent SNATs.
None
Clone Pool (Client)
A feature that causes the virtual server to replicate client-side traffic (that is, prior to address translation), to a member of the specified clone pool. This feature is used for intrusion detection. You can also configure the Clone Pool (Server) setting.
None
Clone Pool (Server)
A feature that causes the virtual server to replicate server-side traffic (that is, after address translation), to a member of the specified clone pool. This feature is used for intrusion detection.You can also configure the Clone Pool (Client) setting.
None
Last Hop Pool
A setting that directs reply traffic to the last hop router using a last hop pool. This overrides the auto_lasthop setting. In cases where you have more than one router sending connections to the LTM system, connections are automatically sent back through the same router from which they were received when the auto_lasthop global variable is enabled, as it is by default. If you want to exclude one or more routers from auto-lasthop, or if the global auto_lasthop is disabled for any reason (for example, you may not want it for an SSL gateway), you can use a last hop pool instead. (If auto_lasthop is enabled, the last hop pool takes precedence over it.)
Before configuring a last hop pool, you must first create a pool containing the router inside addresses.
None

 

Resources

If you have created a load balancing virtual server, you must assign a default load balancing pool to it. If you plan on using an iRule to direct certain kinds of traffic, you must also assign the iRule to the virtual server, as well as to any pools that are specified within the iRule. These pool and iRule assignments are known as resources.

Table 2.3 lists and describes the specific resources that you can assign to a load balancing virtual server.

Table 2.3 Resources assigned to a load balancing virtual server
Resource
Description
Default Value
Default Pool
The pool name that you would like the virtual server to use as the default pool. A load balancing virtual server sends traffic to this pool automatically, unless an iRule directs the server to send the traffic to another pool instead.
No default value
Default Persistence Profile
The type of persistence that you want the LTM system to use.
None
Fallback Persistence Profile
The type of persistence that the LTM system should use if it cannot use the specified default persistence.
None
iRules
A list of existing iRules that you want the virtual server to use when load balancing its connections. Note that for all iRules that you select, you must configure a corresponding profile on the virtual server. For example, if you are specifying an iRule that includes HTTP commands, you must configure a default or custom HTTP profile on the virtual server. Similarly, if you are implementing an authentication iRule, you must configure a default or custom authentication profile.
Once you assign a pool and an iRule to a virtual server, then if all nodes in the pool become unavailable, the virtual server becomes unable to forward the types of requests articulated in the iRule. For example, the following iRule my_ruleA causes the virtual server to forward requests to pool bigip1 when the URI ends with the string fuchu. If all nodes in pool bigip1 are down, the virtual server is unable to forward those requests.
rule my_ruleA {
if { [HTTP:uri ] ends_with "fuchu" } {
pool bigip1
}
else {
pool bigip2
}
}
If the iRule you want to implement does not appear in the iRules list, the iRule does not exist and you must first create it. If the iRules setting does not appear on the New Virtual Server screen, check your licensing.
No default value

 

Configuring virtual address properties and settings

The Configuration utility displays virtual address properties and settings. Table 2.4 lists and describes the general properties and configuration settings of a virtual address.

Table 2.4 General properties and configuration settings of a virtual address
Property
Description
Default Value
Address
The IP address of the virtual server, not including the service.
No default value
State
The state of the virtual address, that is, enabled or disabled.
Enabled
Connection limit
The number of concurrent connections that the LTM system allows on this virtual address.
0
ARP
A setting that enables or disables ARP requests.
Enabled

 

Managing virtual servers and virtual addresses

When generally managing virtual servers and virtual addresses, you typically need to view existing virtual server or virtual address configurations. Occasionally, too, you might need to delete a virtual server.

When working with virtual servers that you have created, you can:

  • View a virtual server configuration
  • View a virtual address configuration
  • Delete a virtual server

Viewing a virtual server configuration

Occassionally, you might want to determine whether you need to adjust virtual server settings, or create new virtual servers. When you view a virtual server configuration, you can view:

  • A list of virtual servers
  • Virtual server properties and settings
  • Virtual server resources
  • Virtual server statistics

Viewing a list of virtual servers

You can view a list of existing virtual servers that you have created. When you display the list of virtual servers, the Configuration utility displays the following information about each virtual server:

  • Status
  • Virtual server name
  • Destination (virtual address)
  • Service Port
  • Protocol
  • Resource type (load balancing, forwarding, or L2 forwarding)

To view a list of virtual servers

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    A list of all existing virtual servers appears.

Viewing virtual server properties and settings

You can view virtual server properties, such as the profile types that are assigned to the virtual server.

To view virtual server properties

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    A list of all existing virtual servers appears.
  3. In the Name column, click a virtual server name.
    This displays the properties for that virtual server.

Viewing virtual server resources

You can view the default pool, default persistence profile, and fallback persistence profile that are assigned as resources to the virtual server. You can also view any iRules associated with the virtual server. The following procedure shows how to view these resources.

To view virtual server resources

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    A list of all existing virtual servers appears.
  3. Click a virtual server name.
    This displays the properties for that virtual server.
  4. On the menu bar, click Resources.
    This displays the resources assigned to the virtual server.

Viewing virtual server statistics

Using the Configuration utility, you can view statistics for any existing virtual servers.

To view statistics for a virtual server

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    A list of all existing virtual servers appears.
  3. In the Name column, click the name of a virtual server.
  4. From the Statistics menu, choose Virtual Server.
    This displays the statistics for the virtual server.

Viewing a virtual address configuration

Occassionally, you might want to view virtual address settings, to determine whether you need to adjust them. In working with virtual address configurations, you can view:

  • A list of virtual addresses
  • Virtual address properties
  • Virtual address statistics

Viewing a list of virtual addresses

You can view a list of existing virtual addresses that you have created, and adjust any of their settings. When you display the list of virtual addresses, the Configuration utility also displays the state of that address (enabled or disabled).

To view a list of virtual addresses

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    By default, a list of all existing virtual servers appears.
  3. On the menu bar, click Virtual Address List.
    A list of all existing virtual addresses appears.

Viewing virtual address properties

The following procedure shows how to view virtual address properties.

To view or adjust virtual address properties

  1. Display the list of existing virtual addresses, using the previous procedure.
  2. Click a virtual address.
    This displays the properties for that virtual address.

Viewing virtual address statistics

Using the Configuration utility, you can view statistics for any existing virtual addresses.

To view statistics for a virtual address

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    By default, a list of all existing virtual servers appears.
  3. On the menu bar, click Virtual Address List.
    A list of all existing virtual addresses appears.
  4. From the Statistics menu, choose Virtual Address.
    This displays statistics for the virtual address.

Deleting a virtual server

You can permanently delete a virtual server and its virtual address from a configuration.

To delete a virtual server

  1. On the Main tab, expand Local Traffic.
  2. Click Virtual Servers.
    This displays a list of existing virtual servers.
  3. Check the Select box to the left of any virtual server that you want to delete.
  4. Click Delete.
    This displays the Delete Confirmation screen.
  5. Click Delete.
    This removes the virtual server.



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