Applies To:

Show Versions Show Versions

Manual Chapter: Using tmsh to Set Up Implementations
Manual Chapter
Table of Contents   |   << Previous Chapter

12 
This chapter describes three different implementations in which you provision and configure the Global Traffic Manager using the Traffic Management Shell (tmsh). Refer to these topics:
These implementation focus on the fictional company, SiteRequest. They are based on the fact that you have already installed and licensed the BIG-IP system software, and either run the Setup utility or used tmsh to configure the basic network elements.
When you use tmsh commands to configure the Global Traffic Manager, the system automatically saves the configuration changes in the file /config/gtm/wideip.conf. Note that only users with Administrator or Resource Administrator roles assigned to their user accounts on the BIG-IP system can access tmsh.
Warning: You must provision the Global Traffic Manager before you configure it; otherwise, you lose the system configuration when you provision the system.
In the first implementation, SiteRequest has purchased a stand-alone Global Traffic Manager to use in its North American data center. SiteRequest wants to use the system to handle DNS requests for and load balance traffic to www.siterequest.com, and its aliases www.store.siterequest.com and www.checkout.siterequest.com. SiteRequest wants the system to respond to these DNS requests on the IP address 192.168.5.17 and to load balance the traffic to two virtual servers on the system: 10.1.6.100:http and 10.1.6.101:80.
You must provision the Global Traffic Manager before you configure it. Provisioning apportions CPU, memory, and disk space among the system software modules.
Note: A stand-alone Global Traffic Manager includes a Local Traffic Manager that is provisioned at the nominal level by default.
2.
Type tmsh, to access the Traffic Management Shell.
After you provision the system, F5 Networks recommends that you configure the system so that it does not run the Setup utility when a user opens the Configuration utility.
The next task is to create a data center to associate on your network the resources that share the same subnet. The Global Traffic Manager consolidates the paths and metrics data collected from the resources into the data center, and uses that data to conduct load balancing operations.
Important: You must configure at least one data center before you can add servers to the Global Traffic Manager configuration.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
After you create a data center, the next task is to configure the Global Traffic Manager to respond to DNS requests with the IP address 192.168.5.17. To do this, create a server in the north_america data center that represents the system itself. Assign a bigip monitor to the server to track the status of the server.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
After you create a server, add virtual servers to the server. A virtual server, in this context, is a specific IP address and port number that points to the server you created in the previous task.
SiteRequest wants to load balance the traffic to www.siterequest.com across virtual servers with these IP addresses: 10.1.6.100:http and 10.1.6.101:80.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
modify server gtm1 virtual-servers add
{ 10.1.6.100:http 10.1.6.101:80 }
Now that you have created virtual servers, create a pool that the Global Traffic Manager uses to load balance traffic to those virtual servers.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
After you create a pool, create a wide IP that maps www.siterequest.com to the virtual servers you previously created. To do this, add the pool with the virtual servers to the wide IP. You can also add aliases for the domain name to the wide IP.
SiteRequest wants to create the wide IP www.siterequest.com and add to it the aliases www.store.siterequest.com and www.checkout.siterrequest.com.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
create wideip www.siterequest.com pools add {my_pool} aliases add { www.store.siterequest.com www.checkout.siterequest.com }
www.store.siterequest.com
www.checkout.siterequest.com
To configure the Global Traffic Manager to communicate with the rest of your network, create a listener that monitors the network for DNS queries that are destined for its IP address 192.168.5.17.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
The IP address 192.168.5.17 does not match a self IP address on the system; therefore, the system saves the listener in the file bigip.conf.
Note: The system saves listeners with IP addresses that match a self IP address on the system in the file bigip_local.conf.
In the second implementation, SiteRequest already has BIG-IP Local Traffic Manager systems in its data center. SiteRequest wants to add a new Global Traffic Manager system to its South American data center to respond to DNS requests on the IP address 192.168.5.18.
Run either the bigip_add or big3d_install utility
You must provision the Global Traffic Manager before you configure it. Provisioning apportions CPU, memory, and disk space among the system software modules.
2.
Type tmsh, to access the Traffic Management Shell.
The next task is to create a data center to associate the resources on your network that share the same subnet. The Global Traffic Manager consolidates the paths and metrics data collected from the resources into the data center, and uses that data to conduct load balancing operations.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
After you create a data center, the next task is to configure the Global Traffic Manager to respond to DNS requests with the IP address 192.168.5.18. To do this, create a server in the south_america data center that represents the system itself. Assign a bigip monitor to the server to track the status of the server.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
After you create a server for the Global Traffic Manager itself, create a server on the Global Traffic Manager for each of the other BIG-IP systems on your network.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
The next task is to run a utility to add the new Global Traffic Manager to the network. Run one of the following utilities based on your network configuration:
If the other BIG-IP systems on the network are running an earlier version of the big3d agent, run the big3d_install utility.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
2.
Run this command: run bigip_add.
The utility exchanges the appropriate SSL certificates, and authorizes communications between the Global Traffic Manager and the other BIG-IP systems for which you defined servers in the previous task.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
run big3d_install
The utility exchanges the appropriate SSL certificates, authorizes communications between the Global Traffic Manager and the BIG-IP systems for which you defined servers in the previous task, and automatically updates the big3d agents on all the devices.
run big3d_install <IP addresses of existing BIG-IP systems>
The utility exchanges the appropriate SSL certificates, authorizes communications between the Global Traffic Manager and the BIG-IP systems specified in the command sequence, and automatically updates the big3d agents on all the devices.
The last task is to configure the Global Traffic Manager to communicate with the rest of the network. To do this, create a listener that monitors the network for DNS queries that are destined for its IP address 192.168.5.18.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
The system saves the listener in the file bigip_local.conf, because the listener has an IP address that matches a self IP address on the system.
Note: The system saves, to the file bigip.conf, listeners with IP addresses that do not match self IP addresses on the system.
You have successfully added the Global Traffic Manager to a network that contains BIG-IP systems. The systems are synchronized and the Global Traffic Manager is configured to respond to DNS requests on 192.168.5.18.
In the third implementation, SiteRequest purchased another Global Traffic Manager to use in its Asian data center. SiteRequest wants to add the new system to a synchronization group that contains the original Global Traffic Manager. It wants to configure the new system to respond to DNS requests on the IP address 192.168.5.18.
To add a Global Traffic Manager using tmsh, complete the following tasks.
Run the gtm_add utility
You must provision the Global Traffic Manager before you configure it. Provisioning apportions CPU, memory, and disk space among the system software modules.
2.
Type tmsh, to access the Traffic Management Shell.
Now that you have provisioned the new Global Traffic Manager, create a new data center on an existing Global Traffic Manager. In this implementation, SiteRequest wants to create an Asian data center.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
After you create a data center, the next task is to configure the new Global Traffic Manager to respond to DNS requests with the IP address 192.168.5.19. To do this, on the existing Global Traffic Manager on which you performed the previous task, create a server in the asia data center that represents the new Global Traffic Manager system. Assign a bigip monitor to the server to track the status of the server. Perform this task.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
Now, create the worldwide synchronization group on the existing Global Traffic Manager on which you performed the previous task.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
The system is now a member of the worldwide synchronization group.
Warning: Run the gtm_add utility on only the new Global Traffic Manager. If you run this utility on existing systems, you will replace the existing systems configurations with that of the minimally configured new system.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
3.
Based on your network configuration, respond to the prompts that display. Note that if your system has a FIPS hardware security module (HSM), the utility detects the card and prompts you for a series of responses.
The utility adds the new Global Traffic Manager to the network. The new system has the same configuration as the other systems in the synchronization group.
To configure the new Global Traffic Manager to communicate with the rest of your network, create a listener that monitors the network for DNS queries that are destined for its IP address 192.168.5.19.
1.
Navigate to the tmsh gtm module.
The system automatically saves the listener in the file bigip_local.conf, because the listener has an IP address that matches a self IP address on the system.
Note: The system saves to the file bigip.conf listeners with IP addresses that do not match self IP addresses on the system.
You have successfully added the Global Traffic Manager to a network that contains a Global Traffic Manager system. The systems are synchronized and the new Global Traffic Manager is configured to respond to DNS requests on 192.168.5.19.
Table of Contents   |   << Previous Chapter

Was this resource helpful in solving your issue?




NOTE: Please do not provide personal information.



Incorrect answer. Please try again: Please enter the words to the right: Please enter the numbers you hear:

Additional Comments (optional)