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Manual Chapter: Viewing Statistics
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12 
One of the most important aspects of managing a network is timely access to accurate information on network performance. This information can verify that the Global Traffic Manager is handling your name resolution requests as efficiently as possible, as well as provide data on the overall performance of a specific resource, such as a data center or distributed application.
The Global Traffic Manager gathers statistical data on multiple aspects of your network. You access these statistics through the statistics screen. The types of statistics you can select from this screen include:
The Global Traffic Manager also contains persistence records. A persistence record provides information on network load balancing when the persistence option is enabled for a given pool or virtual server. This option ensures that the system sends name resolution from the same source within a given session to the same resource on your network.
The Global Traffic Manager gathers statistics through a software component called the big3d agent. This agent probes the various monitors that you assign to your network components, and returns statistics based on those monitors. The gtmd utility manages those monitors, determining when to probe and when to time out the probe attempts.
Statistics are often paired with metrics collection; however, the two have different roles. Statistics pertain to a broad set of data that focuses on how often a given set of resources are used and how well those resources are performing. Metrics collection, on the other hand, focuses specifically on data that relates to overall communication between the Global Traffic Manager and an LDNS. Unlike statistics, metrics collection is designed to provide performance data, as opposed to usage or historical data. See Chapter 13, Collecting Metrics, for more information on metrics.
Through the Statistics option on the Main tab of the navigation pane
Both methods take you to the same screen within the Global Traffic Manager. When you access statistics through a menu on the main screen for a given network component, the Statistics screen is pre-configured for the given network element, although you can switch to a different set of statistics at any time.
Additionally, you can use the search feature to locate a specific component or group of components. The default search value is an asterisk (*), which instructs the system to display all relevant components in a list. You can type a string in the box, and when you click the Search button, the system modifies the list to show only those components that match the string. For more information about how the search feature works, see Locating a component using the search feature.
Tip: You can also access statistics from the command line using the tmsh command show. For more information about viewing statistics using tmsh, see the Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) Reference Guide.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand Overview and click Statistics.
The Statistics screen opens.
2.
On the menu bar, click Global Traffic.
The Statistics screen for Global Traffic opens.
3.
From the Statistics Type list, select the type of statistics you want to view.
These statistics are described in later sections of this chapter.
If you select Normalized, the Global Traffic Manager rounds the data to the nearest digit.
If you select Unformatted, the Global Traffic Manager displays the exact value to as many decimal places as the value requires.
5.
From the Auto Refresh list, select the frequency at which the Global Traffic Manager refreshes data on the screen.
If you select Disabled from this list, the system does not refresh the screen; instead, you can click the Refresh button to update the screen with the latest statistical data.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand Global Traffic and click a component, such as Wide IPs.
The main screen for the component opens.
2.
On the menu bar, click Statistics.
The Statistics screen opens displaying statistics relevant to the component.
If you select Normalized, the Global Traffic Manager rounds the data to the nearest digit.
If you select Unformatted, the Global Traffic Manager displays the exact value to as many decimal places as the value requires.
4.
From the Auto Refresh list, select the frequency at which the Global Traffic Manager refreshes data on the screen.
If you select Disabled from this list, the system does not refresh the screen; instead, you can click the Refresh button to update the screen with the latest statistical data.
As you track the performance of your data centers, virtual servers, and other resources, you may find it helpful to have a single screen in which you can get a snapshot of overall resource availability. In the Global Traffic Manager, you can view this data on the Status Summary screen.
Object Type
The Object Type column describes the specific resource type. These types are: distributed application, wide IPs, pools, data centers, links, and servers.
Total
The Total column describes the total number of resources of the type corresponding to the Object Type column, regardless of whether the resource is available.
Available
The Available column describes the total number of resources of the type corresponding to the Object Type column that the Global Traffic Manager can verify as available.
Unavailable
The Unavailable column describes the total number of resources of the type corresponding to the Object Type column that the Global Traffic Manager can verify as unavailable.
Offline
The Offline column describes the total number of resources of the type corresponding to the Object Type column that the Global Traffic Manager can verify as offline.
Unknown
The Available column describes the total number of resources of the type corresponding to the Object Type column that the Global Traffic Manager can verify as available.
Each value within the Total, Available, Unavailable, Offline, and Unknown columns is a link. When you click the link, you access the main screen for that resource, with the list of resources filtered to show only those resources with the corresponding status. For example, if the Available column for data centers has a value of 5, clicking the 5 brings up a filtered main screen for data centers that shows only the five data centers that are available.
Distributed applications
The statistics for distributed applications provide you with information on what distributed applications exist, what wide IPs make up that application, and how the Global Traffic Manager has load balanced traffic to the application.
Wide IPs
The statistics for wide IPs provide you with information on what wide IPs exist and how the Global Traffic Manager has load balanced traffic to the wide IP.
Pools
The statistics for pools provide details on how the Global Traffic Manager has load balanced traffic to each pool.
Data centers
The statistics for data centers revolve around the amount of traffic flowing to and from each data center.
Links
The statistics for links focus on how much traffic is flowing in and out through a specific link to the Internet.
Servers
The statistics for servers display the amount of traffic flowing to and from each server.
Virtual servers
The statistics for virtual servers provide information on the amount of traffic flowing to and from each virtual server.
Paths
The statistics for paths provide information on how quickly traffic moves between an LDNS and a resource for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible.
Local DNS
The Local DNS statistics provide location details related to the different local DNS servers that communicate with the Global Traffic Manager.
The Global Traffic Manager captures several statistics related to the performance of a distributed application. You can use these statistics to see how many resolution requests have been sent for the application, and how the system has load balanced these requests. You can access the wide IP statistics by selecting Distributed Applications from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
As an example of distributed application statistics, consider the fictional company SiteRequest. The IT department at SiteRequest has a distributed application, downloader, which contains multiple wide IPs associated with the viewing and downloading of SiteRequest applications. The wide IPs in the downloader application use the Global Availability load balancing mode. This mode sends all name resolution requests for this wide IP to a specific pool until that pool is unavailable. Because the distributed application is critical to SiteRequests operations, the IT department wants to track traffic to the application and ensure that it is being managed effectively. The distributed applications statistics provide the IT department the information they need to see how many requests are being sent for the application, allowing them to plan additional resource allocations more effectively.
The distributed application statistics screen consists of a Distributed Application Statistics table. This table contains the following information:
Status
The Status column indicates the current status of the wide IP. The available status types are: Available, Unavailable, Offline, and Unknown. Each status type is represented by a symbol; for example, the available status type is represented by a green circle.
Distributed Application
The Distributed Application column displays the name of an application for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible. Each name appears as a link. When you click the link, the properties screen for the distributed application opens.
Members
The Members column provides a link that opens a wide IP details screen for the distributed application. This screen displays load balancing statistics for each pool within the distributed application. You can return to the main distributed application statistics screen by clicking the Back button in the Display Options area of the screen.
Requests
The Requests column displays the cumulative number of Domain Name System (DNS) requests sent to the distributed application.
Load Balancing
The Load Balancing column provides information on how the Global Traffic Manager load balanced connection requests to this resource. This column consists of four subcolumns:
The Preferred subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager load balanced with the preferred load balancing method.
The Alternate subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager load balanced with the alternate load balancing method.
The Fallback subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager load balanced with the Fallback load balancing method.
The Returned to DNS subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager did not resolve and returned to the DNS.
The Global Traffic Manager captures several statistics related to the performance of a wide IP. These statistics primarily focus on how many resolution requests have been sent for the wide IP, and how the Global Traffic Manager has load balanced these requests. You can access the wide IP statistics by selecting Wide IPs from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
As an example of wide IP statistics, consider the fictional company SiteRequest. The IT department at SiteRequest has a wide IP, www.siterequest.com, which uses the Global Availability load balancing mode. This mode sends all name resolution requests for this wide IP to a specific pool until that pool is unavailable. Because the wide IP, www.siterequest.com, is critical to SiteRequests operations, the IT department wants to track traffic to the wide IP and ensure that the primary pool is not at risk of getting overloaded. The wide IP statistics provide the IT department the information they need to see how many requests are being sent for the wide IP, allowing them to plan additional resource allocations more effectively.
Status
The Status column indicates the current status of the wide IP. The available status types are: Available, Unavailable, Offline, and Unknown. Each status type is represented by a symbol; for example, the available status type is represented by a green circle.
Wide IP
The Wide IP column displays the name of a wide IP for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible. Each name appears as a link. When you click the link, the properties screen for the wide IP opens.
Pools
The Pools column provides a link that opens a pool details screen for the wide IP. This screen displays load balancing statistics for each pool within the wide IP. You can return to the main wide IP statistics screen by clicking the Back button in the Display Options area of the screen.
Requests
The Requests column displays the cumulative number of DNS requests sent to the wide IP.
Requests Persisted
The Requests Persisted column displays the cumulative number of requests that persisted. Persisted requests use the same pool during a connection session.
Load Balancing
The Load Balancing column provides information on how the Global Traffic Manager load balanced connection requests to this resource. This column consists of four subcolumns:
The Preferred subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager load balanced with the preferred load balancing method.
The Alternate subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager load balanced with the alternate load balancing method.
The Fallback subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager load balanced with the Fallback load balancing method.
The Returned to DNS subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager did not resolve and returned to the DNS.
The pool statistics available through the Global Traffic Manager focus on how the Global Traffic Manager has load balanced name resolution requests. You can access the pool statistics by selecting Pools from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
As an example of pool statistics, consider the fictional company SiteRequest. The IT department at SiteRequest has a wide IP, www.siterequest.com, which contains pools that use the dynamic load balancing mode, Quality of Service. This mode acquires statistical data on response times between the Global Traffic Manager and an LDNS sending a name resolution request. There has been some concern of late as to how well this new load balancing mode is working and if the Global Traffic Manager is able to gather the statistical information it needs to load balance with this mode, or if it has to resort to an alternate or fallback method. By using the pool statistics screen, the IT department can track how many name resolution requests are load balanced using the preferred Quality of Service method, and how many are load balanced using another method.
Status
The Status column indicates the current status of the pool. The available status types are: Available, Unavailable, Offline, and Unknown. Each status type is represented by a symbol; for example, the available status type is represented by a green circle.
Pool
The Pool column displays the name of a wide IP for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible. Each name appears as a link. When you click the link, the properties screen for the pool opens.
Members
The Members column provides a link that opens a virtual server details screen for the pool. This screen displays connection statistics for each virtual server within the pool, including the number of times the virtual server was selected for a name resolution request and the amount of traffic flowing from and to the virtual server. You can return to the main wide IP statistics screen by clicking the Back button in the Display Options area of the screen.
Load Balancing
The Load Balancing column provides information on how the Global Traffic Manager load balanced connection requests to this resource. This column consists of four subcolumns:
The Preferred subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager load balanced with the preferred load balancing method.
The Alternate subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager load balanced with the alternate load balancing method.
The Fallback subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager load balanced with the Fallback load balancing method.
The Returned to DNS subcolumn displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager did not resolve and returned to the DNS.
Data center statistics revolve around the amount of traffic flowing to and from each data center. This information can tell you if your resources are distributed appropriately for your network. You can access the data center statistics by selecting Data Centers from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
As an example of how the statistics for data centers can help you manage your network resources, consider the fictional company SiteRequest. SiteRequest has decided that its New York data center should handle all name resolution requests originating in North America. However, since a new marketing campaign started in the United States and the IT department is concerned it might overload the data center. By using the data center statistics, the IT department can track the overall amount of traffic that the New York data center is handling, allowing them to make adjustments to their load balancing methods in a timely manner.
Status
The Status column indicates the current status of the data center. The available status types are: Available, Unavailable, Offline, and Unknown. Each status type is represented by a symbol; for example, the available status type is represented by a green circle.
Data Center
The Data Center column displays the name of a data center. Each name appears as a link. When you click the link, the properties screen for the data center opens.
Servers
The Servers column provides a link that opens a server details screen for the data center. This screen displays connection statistics for each server at a data center, including the number of times the server was selected for a name resolution request and the amount of traffic flowing from and to the server. You can return to the main data center statistics screen by clicking the Back button in the Display Options area of the screen.
Connections
The Connections column displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager resolved using a resource from the corresponding data center.
Throughput (bits/sec)
The Throughput (bits/sec) column contains two subcolumns:
Throughput (packets/sec)
The Throughput (packets/sec) column contains two subcolumns:
Link statistics focus on how much traffic is flowing in and out through a specific link to the Internet. This information can help you prevent a link from getting over-used, saving your organization from higher bandwidth costs. You can access the link statistics by selecting Links from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
As an example of how the statistics for data centers can help you manage your network resources, consider the fictional company SiteRequest. SiteRequest has two links with two different Internet Service Providers (ISPs). The primary ISP is paid in advance for a specific amount of bandwidth usage. This allows SiteRequest to save money, but if the bandwidth exceeds the prepaid amount, the costs increase considerably. As a result, the IT department uses a second ISP, which has a slower connection but considerably lower costs. By using the links statistics, the IT department can ensure that links to the Internet are used as efficiently as possible.
Status
The Status column indicates the current status of the link. The available status types are: Available, Unavailable, Offline, and Unknown. Each status type is represented by a symbol; for example, the available status type is represented by a green circle.
Link
The Link column displays the name of a link for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible. Each name appears as a link. When you click the link, the properties screen for the link opens.
Throughput (bits/sec)
The Throughput (bits/sec) column contains four subcolumns:
The Over Prepaid column displays the amount of traffic, in bits per second, that has exceeded the prepaid traffic allotment for the link.
In addition to viewing the link data as a table, you can also view it in a graph format. To use this format, click the Graph button. A graph screen opens, which shows the amount of traffic used over time. You can change the amount of time shown in the graph by selecting a value from the Graph Interval list, located in the Display Options area of the screen.
With server statistics, you can analyze the amount of traffic flowing to and from each server. This information can tell you if your resources are distributed appropriately for your network. You can access the server statistics by selecting Servers from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
As an example of how the statistics for servers can help you manage your network resources, consider the fictional company SiteRequest. The IT department at SiteRequest is considering whether it needs a few more servers to better manage name resolution requests; however, there is some debate as to whether the servers should be consolidated at the New York data center (which the New York team prefers) or spread out over all of the data centers. It is also possible that an under-utilized server at one data center might be moved to another data center. By using the server statistics, the IT department can look at how much traffic is handled by each server, giving them the information they need to decide where these new servers, if any, should go.
Status
The Status column indicates the current status of the server. The available status types are: Available, Unavailable, Offline, and Unknown. Each status type is represented by a symbol; for example, the available status type is represented by a green circle.
Server
The Server column displays the name of a server for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible. Each name appears as a link. When you click the link, the properties screen for the server opens.
Virtual Servers
The Virtual Servers column provides a link that opens a virtual server details screen for the server. This screen displays connection statistics for each virtual server at a data center, including the number of times the virtual server was selected for a name resolution request and the amount of traffic flowing from and to the server. You can return to the main data center statistics screen by clicking the Back button in the Display Options area of the screen.
Picks
The Picks column displays the cumulative number of times the Global Traffic Manager picked a server to handle a name resolution request.
Connections
The Connections column displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager resolved using a resource from the corresponding data center.
Throughput (bits/sec)
The Throughput (bits/sec) column contains two subcolumns:
Throughput (packets/sec)
The Throughput (packets/sec) column contains two subcolumns:
Virtual server statistics provide information on the amount of traffic flowing to and from each virtual server. This information can tell you if your resources are distributed appropriately for your network. You can access the virtual server statistics by selecting Virtual Servers from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
As an example of how the statistics for servers can help you manage your network resources, consider the fictional company SiteRequest. SiteRequest recently added a Local Traffic Manager to their Tokyo data center. The IT department wants to see how well the new system is handling the traffic, and if it can perhaps be utilized to handle traffic for a new wide IP, www.SiteRequestAsia.com. After installing the Local Traffic Manager and adding it to the Global Traffic Manager as a server, the IT department can use the virtual server statistics to monitor the performance of the virtual servers that compose the new Local Traffic Manager, allowing them to determine if more resources are required for the new wide IP.
Status
The Status column indicates the current status of the server. The available status types are: Available, Unavailable, Offline, and Unknown. Each status type is represented by a symbol; for example, the available status type is represented by a green circle.
Virtual Server
The Virtual Server column displays the name of a virtual server for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible. Each name appears as a link. When you click the link, the properties screen for the virtual server opens.
Server
The Servers column provides a link that opens a server details screen for the data center. This screen displays connection statistics for each server at a data center, including the number of times the server was selected for a name resolution request and the amount of traffic flowing from and to the server. You can return to the main data center statistics screen by clicking the Back button in the Display Options area of the screen.
Picks
The Picks column displays the cumulative number of times the Global Traffic Manager picked a server to handle a name resolution request.
Connections
The Connections column displays the cumulative number of requests that the Global Traffic Manager resolved using a resource from the corresponding data center.
Throughput (bits/sec)
The Throughput (bits/sec) column contains two subcolumns:
Throughput (packets/sec)
The Throughput (packets/sec) column contains two subcolumns:
The paths statistics captured by the Global Traffic Manager provide information on how quickly traffic moves between an LDNS and a resource for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible. Information presented in the paths statistics screen includes details on round trip times (RTT), hops, and completion rates. You can access the paths statistics by selecting Paths from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
Paths statistics are primarily used when you employ a dynamic load balancing mode for a given wide IP or pool. You can use the information in the Paths statistics to get an overall sense of how responsive your wide IPs are in relation to the local DNS servers that have been sending name resolution requests to a wide IP.
Local DNS Address
The Local DNS Address column displays the IP address of each LDNS that has sent a name resolution request for a wide IP for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible.
Link
The Link column displays the ISP link that the Global Traffic Manager used to send and receive data from the LDNS.
Round Trip Time (RTT)
The Round Trip Time (RTT) column contains two subcolumns:
Hops
The Hops column contains two subcolumns:
The Average subcolumn displays the average number of hops between the LDNS and the Global Traffic Manager.
Completion Rate
The Completion Rate column contains two subcolumns:
The Current subcolumn displays the current completion rate of transactions between the LDNS and the Global Traffic Manager.
The Average subcolumn displays the average completion rate of transactions between the LDNS and the Global Traffic Manager.
Last Probe Time
The Last Probe Time column displays the last time the Global Traffic Manager probed the LDNS for metrics data.
The Local DNS statistics screen provides location details related to the different local DNS servers that communicate with the Global Traffic Manager. These statistics include the geographical location of each LDNS as well as a timestamp for the last time that the LDNS accessed the Global Traffic Manager. You can access LDNS statistics by selecting Local DNS from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
As an example of how the statistics for servers can help you manage your network resources, consider the fictional company SiteRequest. SiteRequest is currently considering whether it needs a new data center in North America to ensure that its customers can access SiteRequests web site as effectively as possible. To help make their decision, the IT department uses the local DNS statistics to see where most of their European traffic is coming from. By using these statistics, the IT department discovers that a high concentration of local DNS servers accessing SiteRequest is in the southwest United States. This information proves helpful in determining that a new data center in Las Vegas might be appropriate.
IP Address
The IP Address column displays the IP address of each LDNS that has sent a name resolution request for a wide IP for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible.
Requests
The Requests column displays the number of times this LDNS has made a name resolution request that the Global Traffic Manager handled.
Last Accessed
The Last Accessed column displays the last time the LDNS attempted a connection to the Global Traffic Manager.
Location
The Location column contains four subcolumns:
One of the common methods of modifying name resolution requests with the Global Traffic Manager is to activate persistent connections. A persistent connection is a connection in which the Global Traffic Manager sends name resolution requests from a specific LDNS to the same set of resources until a time-to-live value has been reached. If you use persistent connections in your configuration of the Global Traffic Manager, you may want to see what persistent connections are currently active on your network. You can access the persistence records by selecting Persistence Records from the Statistics Type list in the Statistics screen. For information on accessing the Statistics screen, see Accessing statistics.
Local DNS Address
The LDNS Address column displays the IP address of each LDNS that has sent a name resolution request for a wide IP for which the Global Traffic Manager is responsible.
Level
The Level column displays the level at which the persistent connection is based. Available types are wide IPs and distributed applications.
Destination
The Destination column displays the wide IP or distributed application to which the name resolution request was directed.
Target Type
The Target Type column displays the type of resource on which persistence is based. Examples of target types include data centers, servers, pools, and virtual servers.
Target Name
The Target Name column displays the name of the resource on which persistence is based.
Expires
The Expires column displays the time at which the persistence for the given LDNS request expires.
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