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Manual Chapter: Performing Basic Configuration Tasks
Manual Chapter
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You must complete several essential network configuration tasks before you can run the Application Security ManagerTM Deployment wizard to create a security policy. This chapter describes the minimum tasks that must be completed.
For detailed information about the network management and system management options that are available on a BIG-IP® system, refer to the TMOS® Management Guide for BIG-IP® Systems. For detailed information about the local traffic configuration options, refer to the Configuration Guide for BIG-IP® Local Traffic ManagerTM.
Important: Each network topology is unique. When defining network settings for the deployment scenarios, you must make any necessary configuration adjustments to address the specific requirements of your network.
Define a VLAN.
A VLAN is a group of one or more hosts on a local area network (LAN) that operate in the same IP address space. See Configuring a VLAN, for more information.
Define a self IP address.
A self IP address is an IP address that you associate with a VLAN, to access hosts in that VLAN. See Configuring a self IP address, for more information.
Define a local traffic pool.
The local traffic pool contains the web server or application server resources that host the web application that you want to protect with a security policy. You create the local traffic pool, and then associate the pool with an application security class. See Defining a local traffic pool, for more information.
Define an application security class.
Application security classes filter HTTP requests to determine which traffic the Application Security Manager inspects. When you define an application security class, the system automatically creates a corresponding web application and a default security policy in the Application Security Manager configuration. See Defining an application security class, for more information.
Create a virtual server that uses the application security class as a resource.
The local traffic virtual server load balances the network resources that host the web application you are securing. You configure the virtual server, and then associate the application security class with it. See Creating a virtual server, for more information.
Optional network configuration options
The BIG-IP system has several additional configuration options available, to help you further customize the network and system setup. See Optional network configuration tasks, for more information.
Important: The tasks described in this chapter begin after you have installed the BIG-IP system, activated the license, and configured the appropriate network settings for the BIG-IP system itself, for example, the management port. If you have not yet completed these activities, refer to the BIG-IP® Systems: Getting Started Guide and the TMOS® Management Guide for BIG-IP® Systems for additional information.
The first task in configuring the local traffic network is to create a VLAN. A VLAN (virtual local area network) is a logical subset of hosts on a local area network (LAN) that operate in the same IP address space. For BIG-IP systems, you create a VLAN, and then associate physical interfaces with that VLAN. In this way, any host that sends traffic to a BIG-IP system interface is logically a member of the VLAN or VLANs to which that interface belongs.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand Network, and then click VLANs.
The VLAN List screen opens.
2.
Click the Create button.
The New VLAN screen opens.
3.
In the Name box, type a unique name for the VLAN.
4.
For the Interfaces setting, click an interface number or trunk name in the Available box, and use a Move button (<< or >>) to move the interface number to the Untagged box. Repeat this step as necessary.
5.
Click Finished.
The screen refreshes, and displays the new VLAN in the VLAN list.
Tip: For detailed information about working with VLANs on BIG-IP systems, see the Configuring VLANS and VLAN Groups chapter in the TMOS® Management Guide for BIG-IP® Systems.
Once you have created a VLAN, you can configure a self IP address. A self IP address is an IP address that you associate with a VLAN, to access hosts in that VLAN.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand Network, and then click Self IPs.
The Self IP List screen opens.
2.
Click the Create button.
The Self IPs screen opens.
3.
In the IP Address box, type the self IP address that you want to assign to a VLAN.
4.
In the Netmask box, type a netmask.
5.
For the VLAN setting, select the name of the VLAN to which you want to assign the self IP address.
6.
Click Finished.
The screen refreshes, and displays the new self IP address in the list.
Tip: For detailed information about self IP addresses, see the Configuring Self IP Addresses chapter in the TMOS® Management Guide for BIG-IP® Systems.
The next configuration task is to define a local traffic pool. The local traffic pool contains the resources, for example, application servers and database servers, that host the actual web application content that you want to protect with the Application Security Manager.
The following procedure outlines basic pool configuration. For detailed information on configuring pools, refer to the Configuration Guide for BIG-IP® Local Traffic ManagerTM.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand Local Traffic, and then click Pools.
The Pool List screen opens.
2.
Click the Create button.
The New Pool screen opens.
3.
In the Configuration area, in the Name box, type a name for the pool.
4.
In the Resources area, for the New Members setting, in the Address box type the IP address for the web server or application server that hosts the web application.
5.
In the Service Port box, type the service port number (for example, type 80 for the HTTP service), or select a service name from the list.
6.
Click the Add button to add the resource to the New Members list.
7.
Click the Finished button.
The screen refreshes and the system displays the new pool in the list.
The next task is to configure an application security class. The application security class filters the incoming HTTP traffic, and forwards traffic that matches the filters to the Application Security Manager for security inspection.
When you configure an application security class, the system automatically creates a default web application in the Application Security Manager configuration. For more information on application security classes, see the Working with Application Security Classes chapter in the Configuration Guide for BIG-IP® Application Security ManagerTM.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand Application Security, and then click Classes.
The HTTP Class Profiles screen opens.
2.
Click the Create button.
The New HTTP Class Profile screen opens.
3.
In the General Properties area, in the Name box, type a name for the application security class.
Tip: This name is also used for the web application so you may want to use a name that relates to the application name.
5.
In the Actions area, check the Custom check box located at the right of the Send To setting and select Pool.
The screen refreshes, and you see additional settings.
6.
For the Pool setting, select the local traffic pool that you created.
7.
Click Finished.
The system adds the class, the default web application, and the corresponding security policy to the configuration, and displays the HTTP Class Profiles screen.
Note: Although you can create an application security class from the Local Traffic section on the Main tab, F5 Networks strongly recommends that you follow the steps above, beginning from Application Security instead because this method enables the Application Security setting by default. The setting is not enabled by default when you initiate the class creation from the Local Traffic section. If the Application Security setting is not enabled, you effectively turn off application security for the associated web application.
The next task is to define a virtual server on the local area network. A virtual server is a traffic-management object that is represented by an IP address and a service. When a virtual server receives a request, it distributes that request to the appropriate back-end resources. That distribution includes applying the application security class to incoming HTTP traffic.
The following procedure outlines the basic virtual server configuration. For detailed information on virtual servers, and other local traffic components, refer to the Configuration Guide for BIG-IP® Local Traffic ManagerTM.
Important: For virtual servers that load balance resources for a web application that is protected by the Application Security Manager, you must configure an HTTP profile in addition to the application security class. Refer to steps 6 and 7 in the following procedure.
Tip: If you are creating an SSL virtual server, refer to the Managing SSL Traffic chapter of the Configuration Guide for BIG-IP® Local Traffic ManagerTM.
1.
On the Main tab of the navigation pane, expand Local Traffic, and then click Virtual Servers.
The Virtual Server List screen opens.
2.
Click the Create button.
The New Virtual Server screen opens.
3.
In the Name box, type a name for the virtual server.
4.
In the Destination option, select Host, and type an IP address.
5.
In the Service Port box, type 80 or select HTTP from the list.
6.
Above the Configuration area, select Advanced.
The screen refreshes, and displays additional configuration options.
7.
In the Configuration area, for the HTTP Profile setting, select http. Note that this step is required.
8.
For the SNAT Pool setting, select Auto Map.
9.
In the Resources area, for the HTTP Class Profiles setting, from the Available list, select the application security class that you created, and click the Move button (<<) to add the class to the Enabled list.
10.
Click Finished.
The system updates the configuration, and the Virtual Server list screen opens, where you can see your newly created virtual server.
Many other network configuration options are available on the BIG-IP system. Depending on your network environment, you may need to configure the following additional networking features of the BIG-IP system:
Refer to the TMOS® Management Guide for BIG-IP® Systems for detailed information on configuring these and other options.
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