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Manual Chapter: Schedules
Manual Chapter
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You can use the optional description command to set a descriptive string for the current schedule. This appears in show commands.
Use the no form of the command to delete the description.
text (1-256 characters) is your description. Surround the text with quotation marks () if it contains any spaces.
bstnA(gbl-schedule[backupWindow])# description "regular backup times"
Use the duration command to limit the amount of time that a rule can run each time the schedule fires. (A schedule is applied to a policy rule, to determine when and how frequently the rule should fire.)
Use no duration to allow the rule to run indefinitely every time.
duration HH:MM[:00]
HH:MM[:00] is the duration allowed for any rule on this schedule (for example, 00:30:00 for 30 minutes). The only accepted value for seconds is 00 (zero).
Use this command to impose a limit on all rules that use the current schedule. If (during any run) the rule exceeds this time limit, the rule stops processing. For example, if you set a 2-minute duration for a place-rules schedule and one run of the rule exceeds the limit, that run stops. This stops any volume scan in progress, cancels all migrations, and causes the policy engine to start recording files or directories that clients change (if they now match the placement rules fileset, they are queued for migration when the schedule next fires). New files and directories, which are directed to a share before they are created, are unaffected by an expired duration.
Use the every command to determine the current schedules frequency.
every count {minutes | hours | days | weeks | months | quarters | years}
every day-list day-of-month[,day-of-month]+
every hour-list hour:minute[,hour:minute]+
count {minutes | ... | years} creates a simple schedule with a single time period between each time that the schedule fires. For example, every 2 weeks or every 5 hours.
count (1-4294967295) is the number of minutes, hours, days, etc. between scheduled events.
minutes | ... | years is a required choice.
sunday | ... | saturday creates a weekly schedule that fires on the given day or days of the week.
first sunday | ... | saturday makes a monthly schedule that fires on the first given day of the month.
last sunday | ... | saturday creates a monthly schedule that fires on the last given day of the month.
day-list results in a schedule that runs on one or more days of the month. For example, day-list 10,20 creates a schedule that fires on the 10th and the 20th of each month. If you enter 31, the policy engine fires on the last day of the month, whether or not the month has 31 days.
hour-list makes a schedule that runs on one or more times of the day. Use a 24-hour clock to specify the hours. For example, hour-list 04:00,12:00,23:00 fires three times per day: it fires at 4 AM, noon, and 11 PM.
To set a start time and/or date for the schedule, use the start command. If you choose an every command that does not include a time (such as every first tuesday), the start time determines the time of day that the schedule fires.
prtlndA(gbl-schedule[payday])# every tuesday thursday
stkbrgA(gbl-schedule[threeDaily])# every hour-list 03:00,13:00,22:00
Use no schedule to delete a schedule.
name (1-64 characters) is the name you choose for the schedule.
This command places you in gbl-schedule mode, where you define the period for the schedule (every 3 hours, every day, every 2 weeks, or some other period) with the every command. You can also define an optional start time and/or date; the default start time is the moment that you create the schedule. If you want to impose a time limit on rules each time they run, you can use the duration command. The optional description (gbl-schedule) command assigns a descriptive string to the schedule. To set an expiration date for the schedule, use the stop command.
Use the schedule (gbl-ns-vol-plc) command to assign a schedule to a file-placement rule. Use the schedule (gbl-ns-vol-shdwcp) command to assign a schedule to a shadow-copy rule. The schedule (gbl-ns-vol-...snap) command assigns a schedule to a snapshot rule. To assign a schedule to auto-diagnostics collection, which monitors usage trends on the chassis, you can use the schedule (gbl-auto-diag) command.
bstnA(gbl)# schedule hourly
prtlndA(gbl)# no schedule every_2_months
Use the show schedule command to view all schedules.
show schedule [schedule-name]
schedule-name (optional, 1-64 characters) focuses the command on a single schedule. If a name is not specified, all schedule names are displayed.
Schedule is the schedules configured name, set by the schedule command.
Description only appears if set by the gbl-schedule description (gbl-schedule) command.
Start Time can be reset by the gbl-schedule start command. This is the date and time of day used for all time-based calculations: for example, if a schedule runs every Wednesday, this determines the time of day on Wednesdays when the schedule fires.
Stop Time only appears if set by the gbl-schedule stop command. This is the expiration time for the schedule, after which the schedule never fires.
Interval is set by the gbl-schedule every command. This is the time between scheduled runs.
Duration appears only if set by the gbl-schedule duration command. This is the amount of time allotted for migrations or replications before a scheduled rule goes into a paused state (similar to the one invoked by the policy pause (gbl-ns-vol) command.) A 0 (zero) means that there is no limit on the duration: each time a rule runs on this schedule, it can run indefinitely.
Status is Paused (the schedule is between run times), Running, or Waiting for start time (the schedule has never been invoked).
Previous is a sub-table showing the Run time (when the run started) and End time of the most-recent run.
Current appears if the rule is currently running. This has the same fields as the Previous table, Run time and End time.
Next shows when the schedules next run will begin.
bstnA# show schedule
bstnA# show schedule
Use the start command to set a start time for the current schedule. A schedule is applied to a policy rule, to determine when and how frequently the rule should fire.
Use no start to eliminate the fixed start time from the schedule; this resets the start time to now.
start [mm/dd/yyyy:HH:MM[:00]]
mm/dd/yyyy:HH:MM[:00] (optional) is the date and time to start the schedule (for example, 05/06/2005:06:00). The only accepted value for seconds is 00 (zero). If you omit this, you reset the start time to now and start the schedule immediately.
A no start resets the date/time to now, but does not fire the schedule.
bstnA(gbl-schedule[daily])# start 11/12/2004:23:00
The stop command establishes an optional end date for the current schedule. A schedule is applied to a policy rule, to determine when and how frequently the rule should run. The schedule stops functioning after this date and time; any rule on the schedule stops all future runs.
Use no stop to eliminate any end date for the schedule.
stop [mm/dd/yyyy:HH:MM[:00]]
mm/dd/yyyy:HH:MM[:00] (optional) is the date and time to stop the schedule (for example, 10/24/2022:18:00). The only accepted value for seconds is 00 (zero). If you omit this, you stop the schedule now, so that rules using the schedule will never run in the future.
bstnA(gbl-schedule[daily4am])# stop 01/07/2011:04:00
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