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Manual Chapter: Place Rules
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Use the enable command to enable the current rule. A new rule is disabled by default, and the policy engine ignores disabled rules.
Use no enable to disable the current rule.
A file-placement rule moves files onto chosen storage. Use the from command to select some source files to move.
Use no from to remove the source fileset, which effectively disables the rule.
from fileset fileset-name [match files]
from fileset fileset-name match directories [promote-directories]
from fileset fileset-name match all [promote-directories]
fileset-name (1-1024 characters) is the name of an existing source fileset.
match files (optional) matches the fileset against files only, ignoring all directories. This is the default.
match directories (optional) matches the fileset against directories only, ignoring all files.
promote directories (optional) causes all migrated directories to be promoted at the target filer. Any new files or subdirectories in these directories will also go to the target filer (unless redirected by another rule).
match all (optional) matches both files and directories.
match ... defaults to matching files only.
Use this command to select particular files and/or directories to migrate. Use the source command to select only from a particular share or share farm. The placement rule migrates all matching files/directories to its target storage. Use the no form of the command to remove the fileset.
This command skips files with multiple Unix hard links. To migrate hard links off of a share, use the source command instead of this command. Alternatively, you can use the the source command and this command together with migrate hard-links.
If a single fileset is too restrictive, use the union-fileset command to join multiple filesets into one.
The from fileset syntax allows you to match the fileset against files, directories, or both.
By matching files only, you can redistribute files with certain names (such as *.mpg) to a share or a share farm. A files-only match can also implement tiering: an age-fileset can select files in a certain age group to migrate to a certain tier (that is, a certain share or share farm). The volume creates replica directories on the destination share, called directory stripes, to hold the files.
Each directory has one master copy on the share where the volume first discovered it. A directory can have no stripes or up to one stripe per remaining share in the volume. As stated above, the volume typically creates stripes to hold migrated files. If you use the from fileset syntax to match against directories only or all (both files and directories), you can use the promote-directories flag to promote the stripe on the target share to master.
To make all new directory trees grow on the target filer, use the match directories option without promote-directories. This steers all ensuing client-created directories to the target share. These new directories will exist at the target share first, where they will be master. Directory trees under those new directories will follow them to the target share. Files under the pre-existing directories will tend to stay on their source filers, since their masters remain on the source filers.
You can make whole directory trees grow at the target filer with match directories and promote-directories. This creates master copies of all matching directories at the target filer. This does not migrate any existing files, but it does steer all new files and subdirectories to the target filer. This can be useful if a nsck ... rebuild operation has scattered a directory trees mastership among multiple shares.
The no from command removes the only source fileset from the rule, effectively disabling it if there is no source to drain. The CLI prompts for confirmation before doing this; enter yes to proceed.
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[wwmed~/acct])# place-rule copytoNas206
By default, a file-placement rule finds its source files by monitoring all new files as they are created, monitoring client changes as they happen (inline), and scanning the volume for existing files. Use the no inline notify command to disable inline-change notifications and work with new and scanned files only.
Use the inline notify command to re-enable inline notifications for the current rule.
A tiered-storage configuration has multiple place rules, typically one per tier, with different recommendations for this setting. The placement rule(s) that send files to Tier 1 should have inline notify enabled. The rule(s) that send files to other tiers should use no inline notify and have an assigned schedule. This recommendation ensures that files migrate to tier 1 as soon as they are qualified for that tier, but they do not move to a lesser tier until a scheduled run of a file-placement rule. This reduces the computation load on the policy engine.
An inline event is one that occurs between scheduled runs of the file-placement rule. Clients can make inline changes to files that make them eligible for migration by the file-placement rule. Use this command to enable regular inline-migration reports for the current file-placement rule, to track any inline migrations that may occur.
Use no inline report to prevent inline-migration reports.
inline report {hourly|daily} prefix [verbose]
[delete-empty|error-only]
prefix (1-1024 characters) sets a prefix for all inline-migration reports. Each report has a unique name in the following format:
prefix_YearMonthDayHourMinute.rpt
verbose (optional) enables verbose data in the reports.
delete-empty | error-only (optional) are mutually exclusive.
delete-empty causes the rule to delete any reports that contain no migrated files or errors.
error-only causes the rule to delete any reports that contain no errors.
Use show reports for a list of reports, or show reports file-name to show the contents of one report.
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol-plc[wwmed~/acct~docs2das8])# inline report hourly docsPlc verbose
bstnA# show reports docsPlc_201002270055.rpt
A file-placement rule migrates files from one share to another within a managed volume. Use the limit-migrate command to limit the amount of data moved in this migration. If the placement rule runs on a schedule, this limit applies to each run of the rule.
Use no limit-migrate to remove any limit on the size of migrations.
limit-migrate size[k|M|G|T]
size (1-18,446,744,073,709,551,615) is the size.
k|M|G|T (optional) is the units:
k is kilobytes (1024 bytes),
M is Megabytes (1024*1024 bytes),
G is Gigabytes (1024*1024*1024 bytes), and
T is Terabytes (1024*1024*1024*1024 bytes).
size is in bytes.
The policy engine migrates as many files as possible until it reaches one that would reach or exceed this limit. If the placement rule is on a schedule (gbl-ns-vol-plc), the next run of the rule continues migrating any leftover files until it either finishes or reaches the limit again.
A file-placement rule blocks all CIFS access from a file before it migrates it; this is impossible if another CIFS client already has the file open. You can use the migrate close-file command to permit the rule to automatically close any file opened through CIFS, and hold it closed until it has finished migrating.
Use no migrate close-file to disable the auto-close feature for the current file-placement rule.
fileset (optional, 1-1024 characters) is a fileset to exclude from automatic closure. If a file in this fileset is open through CIFS, the rule places it on a retry queue instead of automatically closing it.
You can use the show policy files-closed command to view any files that are currently closed by file-placement rules.
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol-plc[ns3~/vol~new2shr5])# migrate close-file exclude homedirs
allows the new2shr5 rule to close any open files except files in the homedirs fileset.
Some Unix files have more than one hard link, where each hard link is a different file name (often in a different directory) pointing to the same inode. A file-placement rule typically skips all files with multiple hard links. If your site has many such files and you are migrating a fileset off of a single source share, you can use the migrate hard-links command to migrate all hard links. If one of a files hard links matches the fileset, this command causes the rule to migrate all of the files hard links off of the source share.
Use no migrate hard-links to stop migrating any files with multiple hard links.
The file-placement rule must have a single source share and a fileset (identified with from (gbl-ns-vol-plc)) for this command to function. Additionally, no other place-rule can use the same source share. These rules minimize contention between conflicting file-placement rules, and are enforced by the CLI.
An inline event (see inline notify) is not guaranteed to trigger migration of a multi-hard-link file. To guarantee that all matching multi-link files migrate off of the source share, turn off inline notifications (with no inline notify), assign a schedule (gbl-ns-vol-plc) to the rule, and wait for the next scheduled run of the rule.
Use the no form of the command to stop retaining copies of migrated files.
We recommend that you only use this before using remove-share migrate or a place-rule to migrate all files off of the share. You can use the directory tree as a backup in case you are dissatisfied with the results of the migration. To restore the files after a migration, you must access the filer directly (the directory is named so that the volume cannot import it).
Important: Do not use this in a share-farm with a balance or auto-migrate rule enabled. The policy engine may attempt to migrate files off of the share, and this command would prevent file migration from ever changing the free space on the share. This leads to the policy engine continually migrating files to other shares in the share farm.
A placement rule determines where files are stored on back-end storage devices. Use this command to start configuring a file-placement rule.
Use the no form of the command to remove the placement rule.
name (1-1024 characters) is a name you choose for the placement rule.
When you create a new place-rule, the CLI prompts for confirmation. Enter yes to create the rule. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.)
This command places you in gbl-ns-vol-plc mode, where you choose the source files and the destination storage. This rule dynamically places chosen files and/or directories onto chosen storage devices. Use the from (gbl-ns-vol-plc) command to select a source fileset; you have options to determine whether to match the fileset against files, directories, or both, and you can determine whether any matching directories should be promoted to master on the target storage. Use the target command to select a destination share farm or share for the files.
You can use the show statistics migration command to track all migration activity.
If the placement rule uses a age-fileset, you need a schedule (gbl-ns-vol-plc) to re-assess the fileset as time goes on. Each time the schedule fires, the fileset gathers a new set of files based on that scheduled time. For example, consider a fileset where files are 2 weeks old; on 9/30, those are files modified before 9/16, but on 10/1 the set includes all files modified before 9/17. A daily schedule would expand the set by one day as each day passes. A weekly schedule would expand the set by a full week as each week passes: on 9/30, the 2-week-old set is anything modified before 9/16, on 10/1 it is still anything modified before 9/16, and the set remains that way until the schedule fires again on 10/6. On 10/6 the schedule fires and the fileset becomes anything modified before 9/23 (2 weeks before 10/6).
Some placement rules use a policy-cifs-attributes-fileset, which checks the setting of the offline attribute on each file. If the attribute is set, the file is actually a stub with most of its content archived on another server. The attribute is governed by a Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM) system on the back-end filer, not by client action. The policy engine must scan the back-end filers to detect this attribute setting, and it must re-scan to see if the attribute changed. To make the rule periodically re-scan and discover any changes in this type of fileset, use a schedule (gbl-ns-vol-plc).
The optional schedule (gbl-ns-vol-plc) command has limited uses for non age-based and non-CIFS-attribute filesets. As mentioned above, these filesets are static, and a file-placement rule migrates them to their target share(s) continuously, as they are created or modified.
One other occasion for a schedule is a file-placement rule with a no inline notify setting. A client creates an inline change by editing a file or directory. The rule software receives a notification of the change by default, and immediately migrates the changed file if its new name or size places it into the fileset. With inline notifications disabled, the volume may accumulate changed files that break the current placement rule. You can use a schedule to periodically migrate these changed files to their desired share(s).
You can drain all files and directories from a share or share farm by specifying a source share or share farm without using the from (gbl-ns-vol-plc) command to specify particular files or directories. After draining all of the files off of a share, you can wait for all of the volumes snapshot rules (snapshot rule) to age out, and then you can remove the shares from the managed volume (remove-share nomigrate or remove-share migrate).
The migrate close-file command enables the rule to close any file that is opened through CIFS. A rule with this setting can hold the file closed until the migration is finished. Without this setting, the rule cannot migrate an open file if it remains open for the duration of the overall migration run.
A file-placement rule typically skips files with multiple Unix hard links. To migrate hard links off of a share, use migrate hard-links together with source and from (gbl-ns-vol-plc). Alternatively, you can use the source command alone (without from (gbl-ns-vol-plc) or migrate hard-links) to drain all files off of the share, including files with multiple hard links.
You have the option to set migrate retain-files for the source share(s) before you enable the rule. This keeps copies of all the migrated files in a hidden directory at the root of the share(s). You can use these copies to recover from a failed migration.
You can make the rule simulate a migration with the tentative command. This causes the rule to log all migrations to the syslog as tentative, without actually migrating any files. This is useful for gauging the effects of a potential file migration.
You can use the policy freespace command to determine the amount of free space to maintain on a given share. If the place rule encounters a file that would break this restriction, the rule pauses until the shares free space rises back up to a resume-migrate threshold (also set with the policy freespace command). The volume software probes the back-end share for available free space every 15 seconds. If some other rule migrates files away from the share until its free space rises to the resume level, the place rule continues migrating files onto the share.
If the rule encounters a file big enough to fill the share while the share is still above the resume level, the rule skips the file and tries another file. If the next file fits, the place rule migrates the file. Otherwise, the place rule skips that file, too. This continues until the shares free space drops below the resume level, or until the rule runs out of files to migrate. Once the free space is below the resume level, the migrations proceed as described above: a large enough file causes the rule to pause and wait for the free space to rise back up to the resume level.
A directory in a multi-protocol (NFS and CIFS) share cannot migrate if it has an NFS-only name; the volume cannot access the directory through CIFS to replicate its CIFS attributes. The nsck ... report inconsistencies ... multi-protocol command finds all of the NFS-only names in a multi-protocol volume. You can access the volume through an NFS export and rename the NFS-only directory, or you can temporarily turn off strict-attribute-consistency at the destination share(s).
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[wwmed~/acct])# place-rule copytoNas206
Whenever a rule migrates a file to a share, it checks the shares free space against two thresholds. Each share has a threshold of free space to maintain, as well as another (typically larger) threshold of free space called a resume threshold. If the file would reduce the shares free space below the maintain level, the rule waits until the free space rises to the resume level before continuing. Use the policy freespace command to set these free-space thresholds for the current share.
Use no policy freespace to return to the defaults.
policy freespace maintain{k|M|G|T} resume-migrate resume{k|M|G|T}
policy freespace percent maintain-pct resume-migrate resume-pct
maintain is the amount of free space to maintain on this share.
k|M|G|T chooses the unit of measure: kilobytes, Megabytes, Gigabytes, or Terabytes. A kilobyte is 1,024 bytes, a megabyte is 1,024 kilobytes (1,048,576 bytes), and so on..
resume is a free-space level for resuming migrations to this share. The policy engine uses this value if the share has reached its maintain value; no rule can migrate to the share until its free space rises back to the resume level.
percent (optional) indicates that you are using disk-space percentages for these values instead of specific size measures.
maintain-pct (1-100) expresses the maintain value as a percentage of the overall share size.
resume-pct (1-100) is the resume threshold, expressed as a percentage of the shares total space.
resume - 2G
A rule that is migrating files to this share (such as a place-rule, or a share farms auto-migrate directive) checks each file before migrating it. If the file would reduce the shares free space below the level that the share is supposed to maintain, the rule pauses and sets its status to Target Full. The rule determines its next steps based on the shares current level of free space.
If the shares space is below the resume level, the rule stops migrating. Instead, the rule waits for the shares free space to rise back up to its resume-migrate level. Some other rule must migrate files off of the share to achieve this. The volume software probes the back-end share for free-space every 15 seconds.
If the shares space is already above the resume level, the rule does not wait for the shares free space to rise; the shares free space is already high enough to resume migrating to it. The rule skips the file and moves on to the next one. If the next file fits onto the share while maintaining the required free space, the rule migrates the file. Otherwise, the rule skips the file and moves on to another file. The rule continues migrating and/or skipping files until the shares free space is below its resume level, or until it runs out of files to migrate. If the shares space falls below the resume level, it follows the process above.
Detailed output from show policy shows the number of files skipped along with their total disk space. If the migrating rule is a place-rule with verbose reports enabled (report (gbl-ns-vol-plc)), the report lists all of the skipped files.
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol-shr[medarcv~/rcrds~rx])# policy freespace 4G resume-migrate 5G
Whenever any rule migrates a file to a share, it checks the shares free space against two thresholds. Each share has a minimum free space to maintain, as well as another (typically larger) level of free space called a resume threshold. If the file would reduce the shares free space below the maintain level, the rule waits until the free space rises to the resume level before migrating any more files to the share. The policy freespace command sets these free-space thresholds for an ARX share. Use this policy freespace command, from gbl-ns or gbl-ns-vol mode, to set the same thresholds for every share in the current namespace or volume.
Use no policy freespace to return to the defaults for every share in the current namespace or volume.
policy freespace maintain{k|M|G|T} resume-migrate resume{k|M|G|T}
policy freespace percent maintain-pct resume-migrate resume-pct
maintain is the amount of free space to maintain on these shares.
k|M|G|T chooses the unit of measure: kilobytes, Megabytes, Gigabytes, or Terabytes. A kilobyte is 1,024 bytes, a megabyte is 1,024 kilobytes (1,048,576 bytes), and so on..
resume is a free-space level for resuming migrations to any of these shares. The policy engine uses this value if one of the shares has reached its maintain value; no rule can migrate to such a share until its free space rises back to the resume level.
percent (optional) indicates that you are using disk-space percentages for these values instead of specific size measures.
maintain-pct (1-100) expresses the maintain value as a percentage of the overall share size.
resume-pct (1-100) is the resume threshold, expressed as a percentage of the shares total space.
resume - 2G
This is a macro command for the policy freespace command in gbl-ns-vol-shr mode. This command invokes the individual policy freespace command for every share in the current namespace or volume. The output from show global-config shows the individual share-level policy freespace commands, not this macro command.
This is similar to the policy freespace (gbl-ns-vol-sfarm) command, a macro command for a share farm.
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/rcrds])# policy freespace percent 5 resume-migrate 6
bstnA(gbl-ns[insur])# no policy freespace
The policy engine tries to migrate each file a limited number of times. Use the policy migrate-attempts command to set the migration-attempt limit for this namespace.
Use no policy migrate-attempts to return to the default.
policy migrate-attempts {count | unlimited}
count (1-1000) is the total number of attempts for a failed migration before declaring that the migration failed.
unlimited (optional) causes the policy engine to infinitely retry its failed migrations.
Use the policy migrate-retry-delay command to set the time between retries. If any file is waiting for the policy engine to retry its migration, it is kept in a queue until it successfully migrates; use show policy queue to see all the files in this queue.
bstnA(gbl-ns[medarcv])# policy migrate-attempts 100
bstnA(gbl-ns[wwmed])# no policy migrate-attempts
bstnA(gbl-ns[wwmed])# policy migrate-attempts unlimited
Use no policy migrate-delay to return to the default.
seconds (0-1000) is the delay required after the last write. Before this time elapses, the file is ineligible for migration.
bstnA(gbl-ns[insur])# policy migrate-delay 60
bstnA(gbl-ns[medarcv])# no policy migrate-delay
The direct method of migration is not recommended. Use policy migrate-method staged (or no policy migrate-method) to return to the default staged migration method.
direct | staged is a required choice.
direct makes the policy engine migrate all of its files directly to their destinations. If a snapshot occurs in the middle of a direct migration, the migration is cancelled and must be restarted from the beginning on any later migration attempt. If the file is large enough to require a very long migration time, regular snapshots could prevent the file from ever fully migrating. However, direct migrations are sometimes faster than staged migrations, especially in a volume that migrates large numbers of small files.
staged makes the policy engine migrate each file to a hidden staging area at the destination share, and then move the file to its final name and location. This method succeeds while the volume is taking snapshots, with a minor performance penalty.
The default is adequate for most installations. Change this only on the advice of F5 personnel. If you use this command to change to the direct method, snapshots severely disrupt file migrations. (Snapshots are configured with a snapshot rule in the volume.)
The direct method also creates a larger problem for the following scenario:
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/rcrds])# policy migrate-method staged
Use no policy migrate-retry-delay to return to the default delay.
seconds (0-1000) is the number of seconds between migration retries.
Use the policy migrate-delay command to set the maximum number of retries. If any file is waiting for the policy engine to retry its migration, it is kept in a queue until it successfully migrates; use show policy queue to see all the files in this queue.
bstnA(gbl-ns[medarcv])# policy migrate-retry-delay 300
bstnA(gbl-ns[insur])# no policy migrate-retry-delay
policy order-rule rule1 {before | after} rule2
policy order-rule rule1 {first | last}
rule1 (1-1024 characters) is the name of the rule to move.
before | after is a required choice; this determines if rule1 is ordered before or after rule2.
rule2 (1-1024 characters) does not move. This is used to set the new priority for rule1.
first | last sets an absolute priority for rule1.
2.
All place-rules that use a share (without any fileset) as their source.
3.
All place-rules that use a fileset as their source.
The moving rule (rule1) must go to the other side of the stationary rule (rule2), or the order does not change. For example, if you want to move ruleA to be just before ruleD, you must phrase the command this way: policy order-rule ruleA after ruleC. Nothing happens if you say policy order-rule ruleA before ruleD because ruleA is already before ruleD.
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[ns~/])# policy order-rule mytest after archiveOldFiles
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[ns~/])# policy order-rule wmv2nas3 last
You can use the policy pause command to stop all volume scans and migrations in a managed volume. This can be useful during a storage maintenance procedure, such as a volume backup.
Use the no form of the command to resume all scans and migrations.
policy pause namespace namespace volume volume
no policy pause namespace namespace volume volume
namespace (1-30 characters) identifies the namespace.
volume (1-1024 characters) is the volume where you want to pause all rules.
A file-placement rule causes all new files and directories to be created on their configured back-end shares, without performing any migrations. New files and directories therefore continue to be placed according to your rules while the volume has policy paused.
bstnA# policy pause namespace insur volume /claims
bstnA# no policy pause namespace insur volume /claims
You can use this policy pause command to regularly pause all policy processing in the current volume, according to a fixed schedule.
Use the no form of the command to stop pausing policy on a scheduled basis.
policy pause schedule-name
schedule-name (1-64 characters) is a schedule to use for pausing all rules.
Before you use this command, someone must create a schedule for pausing policy in the current volume. This schedule must have a duration so that policy is not paused indefinitely.
A file-placement rule causes all new files and directories to be created on their configured back-end shares, without performing any migrations. New files and directories therefore continue to be placed according to your rules while the volume has policy paused.
A treewalk is a full examination of all files and directories in a back-end share. For performance reasons, each of the namespaces volume groups uses a small pool of software threads to perform all of its treewalks. The number of simultaneous treewalks in each volume group is equal to the number of threads in the pool; this can create a bottleneck in volume groups with many managed volumes. Use the policy treewalk-threads command to change the number of threads for each of the namespaces volume groups.
Use the negative form of the command, no policy treewalk-threads, to revert to the default number of threads.
thread-count (1-10) is the number of threads to use for treewalk operations. This is the thread count for each volume group in the namespace.
Filesets that are based on file timestamps (such as the age-fileset) require a treewalk every time a rule invokes one of them. If more than four volumes use these filesets at the same time on the same volume group, only four volumes at a time can perform their treewalks. A fifth volumes treewalk cannot begin until one of the first four treewalks is finished. Two filesets in the same volume can share the results of a single treewalk, but two filesets from different volumes cannot.
bstnA(gbl-ns[wwmed])# policy treewalk-threads 5
Use the remove namespace ... policy-only command to remove all policy objects from a namespace or volume.
remove namespace name [volume volume] policy-only [sync]
name (1-30 characters) identifies the namespace.
volume (optional, 1-1024 characters) focuses on a single volume.
policy-only causes the command to remove rules, filesets, and all other policy objects from the namespace or volume. The volume and namespace configurations remain.
sync (optional) shows the operations progress at the command line. With this option, the CLI prompt does not return until all policy components have been removed.
By default, this command generates a report to show all of the actions it takes to remove the volume(s), in order. The CLI shows the report name after you issue the command, and then returns. You can enter CLI commands as the namespace software removes the objects in the background. Use tail to follow the report as it is written. Use show reports file-name to read the report. You can search through the report with grep. To copy or delete it, use the copy or delete commands. Use the sync option to send the status to the command line instead; the command does not generate a report if you use the sync option.
Use remove namespace to remove an entire namespace or volume, including all policy objects. To remove a namespace and all other configuration objects dedicated to the namespace (including global servers and external filers), use remove service. To remove a share from a volume, use remove-share migrate or remove-share nomigrate. The remove namespace ... volume ... exports-only command finds all front-end exports for a volume and removes them, leaving the volume itself intact.
prtlndA# remove namespace insur_bkup policy-only sync
removes all policy objects from the insur_bkup namespace. This uses the sync option, so the progress report appears on the command line instead of a file.
Use no report to prevent progress reports.
report file-prefix [verbose] [delete-empty|error-only]
file-prefix (1-1024 characters) sets a prefix for all file-placement reports. Each report has a unique name in the following format:
verbose (optional) enables verbose data in the reports.
delete-empty | error-only (optional) are mutually exclusive.
delete-empty causes the rule to delete any reports that contain no migrated files or errors.
error-only causes the rule to delete any reports that contain no errors.
Use show reports for a list of reports, or show reports file-name to show the contents of one report.
bstnA# show reports daily_archive_201206200048.rpt
Use this schedule command to assign a schedule to the current file-placement rule.
Use no schedule to remove the rules schedule.
name (1-64 characters) identifies the schedule. Use show policy for a list of configured schedules.
Use the show policy command to view policy configurations.
show policy namespace namespace [details]
show policy namespace namespace volume volume [details]
show policy namespace namespace volume volume rule rule-name
details (optional) changes the output into a detailed view of each rule and share farm. If you omit this, the output is one line per rule or share farm.
namespace (1-30 characters) focuses the command on a single namespace.
volume (1-1024 characters) narrows the scope of the command to one volume in the namespace.
rule-name (1-1024 characters) narrows the scope even further, to one rule or share farm in the volume. This expands the output to show detailed information and statistics about the rule or share farm.
This shows all namespace policies. Use show policy to show all globally-defined filesets, and use show schedule to show all globally-defined schedules. To see the history of policy-related events for a volume, rule, or share farm, use show policy history. The show policy queue command shows all files currently waiting to be migrated, if any.
The simplest syntax, show policy, outputs tables of the rules and share farms in each volume. Each volume has its own table with the following labels:
Rule (the name of the rule or share farm),
Type (Place for a place-rule, Share Farm for a share-farm, Snapshot for a snapshot rule, Replica Snapshot for a snapshot replica-snap-rule, Shadow Copy for a shadow-copy-rule, AutoDiagnostics for an auto-diagnostics rule, Config Replication for a config-replication rule, and Notification for a notification rule), and
Status for the rule. For most rules, this is either Enabled or Disabled. For Place, Share Farm, and Shadow Copy, this shows the volume-scan status. For Place and Share Farm, this also shows the current file-migration status.
If you use show policy details, the output shows the full details of every rule and share farm on the system. These details are described below, in the sections about rules, share farms, and volume-level filesets.
The show policy namespace command shows only the rules and share farms in the given namespace. This output contains a Namespace Migration Configuration table, followed by tables of the namespaces rules.
The Namespace Migration Configuration table contains the following fields:
Migrate-Attempts is the number of times that a rule attempts to migrate a file before it declares a failed migration. You can change this with the policy migrate-attempts command.
Migrate-Delay is the number of seconds that a rule waits after a file has changed before the rule attempts to migrate the file. Changes often occur in batches, so this delay prevents repetitive migrations for a file that is being rewritten. You can use the policy migrate-delay command to reset this delay.
Migrate-Retry-Delay is the delay after a failed migration before the rule retries. The policy migrate-retry-delay command controls this setting.
Each volume has a separate table with all of its rules. These tables are similar to the one in the summary output, with the addition of the Rule Priority field. If two rules contradict for a given file, the higher-priority rule is enforced and the other rule is ignored. For example, if Rule 3 migrates a file to share A and Rule 6 migrates the same file to share B, Rule 3 is enforced and the file migrates to share A.
Rules are prioritized in groups as follows: shadow-copy rules (shadow-copy-rule) are the highest priority, followed by file-placement rules (place-rule) that only use a share or share farm as their source (source), followed by file-placement rules that use a source fileset (from (gbl-ns-vol-plc)), followed by share farms (share-farm) at the lowest priority. The only rules that can possibly contradict one another are the third group: file-placement rules that move a fileset (as opposed to draining a share). To change the order of these rules, you can use policy order-rule.
A drain_share_rule is created as the by-product of the remove-share migrate command. This is prioritized in the second group (file-placement rules that use a source share) while it is running. The policy engine demotes it to the third group (lower-priority file-placement rules) after the share is removed.
The details view shows the full details of every rule and share farm in this namespace.
The show policy namespace ... volume command focuses on the snapshot configuration, free space, share farms, and rules in a single volume. This is a series of summary tables unless you use the details flag.
The show policy namespace ... volume command shows the volume-level configuration for snapshots. These settings are only relevant in a volume that has at least one snapshot rule configured. This section contains the following fields:
Point-in-Time Consistency is Enabled or Disabled, depending on whether or not the volume uses snapshot fencing. The VIP fence, if enabled, blocks all client access to the volume while the filers take their coordinated snapshots. Use the snapshot consistency command to allow or disallow this fence.
Management Command Timeout is the number of seconds that the volume software waits for any filer to respond to a command. If this time expires, the command times out. This is almost always 80 seconds.
CIFS Directory Name only appears if the volume supports CIFS. This is the pseudo directory that well-informed CIFS clients (administrators) can use to access their snapshots. You can use the snapshot directory cifs-name command to change this name.
NFS Directory Name only appears if the volume supports NFS. This is the pseudo directory that well-informed NFS clients (administrators) can use to access their snapshots. You can use the snapshot directory nfs-name command to change this name.
Directory Display is All Exports (clients see the ~snapshot/.snapshot directory in any front-end CIFS share or NFS export) or Volume Root (clients only see the directory only in a front-end share of the volumes root directory), or None. You can use the snapshot directory display command to change this.
Hidden File Attribute only appears if the volume supports CIFS. This is Yes if the special ~snapshot directory has its hidden DOS attribute raised. Use an optional argument in the snapshot directory display command to control this setting. This has no effect on NFS clients.
Restricted Access Configured also only appears for a volume that supports CIFS. This is Yes if a Windows-Management Authorization (WMA) group restricts the CIFS clients that can access snapshots. Use the snapshot privileged-access command to control this setting. As above, this has no effect on NFS clients.
VSS Mode only appears for a volume that supports CIFS. This field indicates the client-machine versions for which the volume supports the Volume Shadowing Service (VSS). VSS is an intuitive interface that clients can use to access their snapshots. This is Windows XP (the volume supports VSS for Windows-XP and newer client machines), Pre-Windows XP (the volume also supports VSS for Windows-2000 clients), or None. Direct volumes do not support VSS. For managed volumes, use the snapshot vss-mode command to change this setting. This does not affect NFS clients.
The show policy namespace ... volume command also shows the free-space thresholds and status from each of its shares. This is a table with the following columns:
Share Name identifies the share in the volume.
Free Space Thresholds shows the two thresholds that you can set with the policy freespace command:
Maintain is the amount of free space to preserve on the share. The policy engine prevents any migrations from reducing the free space below this value.
Resume is the amount of free space that is required on the share before it is eligible for migrations. The policy engine uses this value when the share has reached its Maintain value; it pauses all migrations to the share until the shares free space rises back up to this value.
Free Space Status displays the current state of free space on each share:
Free is the current amount of free space,
Size is the total size of the back-end share, and
Pct Free is the percentage of free space remaining on the share.
A section for each share farm appears if you focus on the volume (show policy namespace ... volume) or focus on the share farm itself (show policy namespace ... volume ... rule share-farm-name). The output has a table of shares for a share farm, followed by a New File Placement rule for the share farm. The first table of shares has the following columns:
Placement Frequency shows the percentage of new files that the balance rule sends to this share. This also shows the numbers used to calculate that percentage.
Freespace Status shows the free space at the share.
A section for each file-placement rule appears if you focus on the volume (show policy namespace ... volume) or focus on the rule itself (show policy namespace ... volume ... rule). The output for file-placement rules and new-file-placement rules contains the following tables of settings and statistics:
Configuration shows all of the administrative settings for this rule or share farm.
Status displays the current status of volume scans and file migrations, which happen periodically. This also shows the status of new-file placement, which occurs as clients create new files.
Cumulative Statistics are the numbers of files migrated, migration failures, and migration retries since the share farm was created. This only appears if the rule or share farm is configured to perform migrations. You can use the policy migrate-attempts, policy migrate-delay, and policy migrate-retry-delay commands to control the migration-retry behavior. One field refers to Inline Overflow errors, which indicate that the placement rule received more inline-notification events (see inline notify) than it could record in its database; contact F5 Support if any such errors appear.
Queue Statistics counts the files where an initial attempt at migration failed (perhaps because the file was locked), so the file was placed into a queue for a later migration attempt.
Last Scan Statistics describes the last full scan of the volume. This does not appear until the first scan is complete.
Current Scan Statistics describes the current scan of the volume, which may not have started yet or may be currently running. This does not appear while the rule is idle.
A section for each snapshot rule appears if you focus on the volume (show policy namespace ... volume) or focus on the rule itself (show policy namespace ... volume ... rule). Each section describes one snapshot rule. The output contains the following tables:
Configuration shows all of the administrative settings for this snapshot rule.
Archive Configuration appears for a snapshot rule that is recording its volumes configuration (and, typically, its metadata) in a file-history archive. If the snapshot rule regularly records this data, you can query the archive later to find the back-end location of any file at any given time. This is useful for backups.
Cumulative Statistics shows the number of snapshots attempted, successful snapshot runs, failed runs, and the overall success rate. If the snapshot sends its data to a file-history archive, there are also statistics for metadata and volume configurations that were archived.
Last Snapshot Statistics describes the results of the rules most-recent snapshot. If the snapshot rule sends data to a file-history archive, this also includes archiving results.
Snapshots is a table of the rules currently-retained snapshots. These are the snapshots that are accessible to the volumes clients. These snapshots are all managed by this snapshot rule, and do not include any snapshots invoked at the filer itself.
A section for each replica-snapshot rule appears if you focus on the volume (show policy namespace ... volume) or focus on the rule itself (show policy namespace ... volume ... rule). Each section describes one snapshot replica-snap-rule. The output contains the following tables:
Configuration shows all of the administrative settings for this replica-snapshot rule.
Snapshots are the same tables that also appear for standard snapshots. These are described above.
A section for each notification rule appears if you focus on the volume (show policy namespace ... volume) or focus on the rule itself (show policy namespace ... volume ... rule). Each section describes one notification rule, which takes regular snapshots to support the ARX API. The output contains the following tables:
Configuration shows all of the administrative settings for this notification rule.
Snapshots are the same tables that also appear for standard snapshots. These are described above.
Configuration shows all of the administrative settings for this shadow-copy rule.
Status shows the overall status of the most-recent shadow-copy run. A status of Complete indicates that the volume copied all files and directories successfully.
For each fileset in the volume, a single Configuration table shows all of the administratively-set parameters for the fileset. To see all filesets defined in gbl mode, use show policy.
bstnA# show policy
prtlndA# show policy namespace nemed
prtlndA# show policy namespace nemed details
prtlndA# show policy namespace nemed volume /acctShdw
bstnA# show policy namespace wwmed volume /acct rule docs2das8
bstnA# show policy
prtlndA# show policy namespace nemed
prtlndA# show policy namespace nemed details
prtlndA# show policy namespace nemed volume /acctShdw
bstnA# show policy namespace wwmed volume /acct rule docs2das8
show policy files-closed namespace namespace volume vol-path [rule rule-name]
namespace (1-30 characters) is the CIFS-supporting namespace,
vol-path (1-1024 characters) identifies a managed volume by its path name, and
rule-name (optional, 1-1024 characters) is a particular file-placement rule. You can use show policy namespace vol-path for a list of all rules in a volume. If you omit this, the output shows the files closed by all file-placement rules in the volume.
The migrate close-file command makes a file-placement rule close open files automatically. This command shows files that have been automatically closed by a rule, not files that are closed by CIFS clients.
The output shows the Namespace and Volume in its top two fields. The Rule field shows the name of the rule. If the rule is a file-placement rule, a table appears below it with one row for every auto-closed file. Each row shows the exact time the file was closed (in UTC, not local time) and the virtual path to the file. The virtual path starts at the root of the managed volume.
bstnA# show policy files-closed namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
bstnA# show policy files-closed namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
source share share-name
source share-farm share-farm-name
share-name (1-64 characters) is the name of a source share in the current volume. This causes the placement rule to select its files from a single share.
share-farm-name (1-64 characters) is a share farm in the current volume. This causes the placement rule to select its files from the chosen share farm.
This is not recommended for a volume with Tiered storage, where file-placement rules migrate new files to Tier-1 shares and older files to Tier-2 shares. Those file-placement rules should select their files from every share in the managed volume.
Use the target command to choose a storage target for the current placement rule. A placement rule puts chosen files onto selected storage. From gbl-ns-vol-plc mode, specify a share or a share farm as the storage target.
target share share-name
target share-farm share-farm-name
share-name (1-64 characters) is a share from the current volume. Use the show namespace command to see the shares in each volume.
share-farm-name (1-64 characters) is a share farm within the current volume. Use the show namespace command to see the share farms in the namespace.
Use no tentative to activate migrations in the current file-placement rule.
show logs syslog
grep syslog
By default, a file-placement rule finds its source files by monitoring all new files as they are created, monitoring client changes as they happen (inline), and scanning the volume for existing files. Use the no volume-scan command to disable volume scans and work with new and changed files only.
Use the volume-scan command to re-enable volume scans for the current rule.
Use the wait-for migration command to wait for a file-placement rule to finish migrating files from a source to a target.
wait-for migration namespace name volume vol-path rule rule [timeout timeout]
name (1-30 characters) is the name of the namespace.
vol-path (1-1024 characters) identifies the volume.
rule (1-2096 characters) is the name of the rule that is migrating files (such as a place rule).
timeout (optional, 1-2096) is the timeout value in seconds.
timeout - none, wait indefinitely
A file-placement rule (created with the place-rule command) may take a long time to migrate a very-large fileset. You can use the wait-for migration command to wait for the operation to finish.
If you set a timeout and it expires before all files have finished migrating, the command exits with a warning. To interrupt the wait-for migration command, press <Ctrl-C>.
bstnA# wait-for migration namespace medarcv volume /rcrds rule dailyArchive timeout 30
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