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Manual Chapter: CIFS Authentication
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18 
Use the active-directory-forest command to start manually configuring one AD-forest representation on the ARX.
Use no active-directory-forest to remove one AD-forest configuration from the switch.
forest-name (1-256 characters) is the name you choose for the forest.
As an alternative to this command, you can automatically discover an AD forest in your network by using the active-directory update seed-domain command. After the forest is configured on the ARX, you can periodically use active-directory update forest to re-synchronize the ARX configuration with the actual AD-forest configuration.
The active-directory-forest command starts the process of manually describing an AD forest to the ARX. This command places you in gbl-forest mode, where you identify all of the domains in the AD forest, along with the DCs that manage them. Use the forest-root command to identify each DC for the forest root.
Kerberos authentication requires an up-to-date DNS database to map front-end CIFS services to their IP addresses. To facilitate DNS updates as CIFS services are added and removed, you can use the name-server command to identify a dynamic-DNS server for each domain in the forest. In many cases, the DC itself can also double as the name server for its domain.
Note: You cannot remove an AD forest if any CIFS service is joined to its root domain (see domain-join). From gbl-cifs mode, use the no cifs command to remove CIFS service, then remove the forest.
bstnA(gbl)# active-directory-forest sierra
bstnA(gbl)# no active-directory-forest ADtrial
Use the no form of the command to remove the forest-to-forest trust between two forests.
forest-1 (1-256 characters) is one of the two forests in the trust relationship. This must have a Windows 2003+ server as its forest-root; earlier versions of Windows do not support forest-to-forest trusts.
forest-2 (1-256 characters) is the other forest in the trust relationship, with the same restrictions as above.
Both AD forests must be configured as active-directory-forests on the ARX, must have Windows 2003+ DCs as their forest-roots, and must have a forest-function level of Windows 2003+ for this command to succeed. An error message explains any such configuration errors, and the command fails.
You can use the active-directory update seed-domain command to automatically discover an AD forest in your network and add it to the ARX configuration.
This records a two-way trust between the two forests. Clients from forest-1 can access CIFS services in forest-2, and clients in forest-2 can also access CIFS services in forest-1.
Because all forest trusts are direct, at least one CIFS service (see cifs) must be configured in one of the forests (forest-1 or forest-2) for the trust to be relevant.
If any of the forest trusts in the Windows network use Selective Authentication, the ARX must use a special algorithm to support clients in those forests. Use the kerberos auto-realm-traversal command to support remote forests with Selective Authentication set. As mentioned above, the kerberos auto-realm-traversal command makes the current command unnecessary; it enables automatic discovery of all trust relationships.
bstnA(gbl)# active-directory forest-trust medarch.org ri.com
bstnA(gbl)# no active-directory forest-trust medarch.org ri.com
If the actual forest changes, you can use the active-directory update forest command to discover the changes and add them to the ARX configuration.
active-directory update forest forest-root proxy-user proxy
[domain-controllers max-dcs] [site-name site]
[verbose] [tentative]
forest-root (1-255 characters) is the name of the forest-root domain. This is often the name of the AD-forest itself, too.
proxy (1-32 characters) is a proxy-user with credentials for accessing the root domains DC(s). The ARX queries the DC for the names of other domains in the same AD forest.
max-dcs (optional, 1-100) sets a maximum number of DCs used in each domain. The ARX queries its DNS server to discover all the DCs in each domain; if the DNS server returns more DCs than max-dcs, the ARX takes the top DCs from the DNS list. The ARX uses the order returned from DNS.
site (optional, 1-64 characters) identifies the AD site for the ARX. This name is defined on a DC with the Active Directory Sites and Services plugin. The site name is case insensitive, so portland and PORTLAND are equivalent. If you omit this, the ARX software uses the AD site configured for the ip proxy-address subnet. Use this option if the ADs site configuration does not include the proxy-IP subnet.
verbose (optional) causes the command to show the results of the forest discovery as it progresses.
tentative (optional) makes the ARX perform the AD-forest discovery without creating the actual active-directory-forest configuration.
max-dcs - all DCs returned from each DNS query.
site - the AD site configured on the external Active Directory for the proxy-IP subnet. This default requires that the proxy-IP subnet is defined in the AD; you can add the subnet on a DC with the Active Directory Sites and Services plugin.
The AD-update operation creates a report named active-directory-forest_name.rpt, where forest_name is the forest that you identified in the command. The CLI displays the name of the report after you issue the command. Use show reports type AdUp to list all AD-update reports. To follow the progress of the AD-update operation, you can use tail reports report-name follow. Use show reports report-name to read the report. You can search through the report with grep. To copy or delete it, use the copy or delete commands. If you want to truncate the report before it finishes, use the truncate-report command. See Figure 18.1 on page 18-9 for a sample report.
Use the show active-directory command to show the configuration of the AD forest, as recorded on the ARX. To see the current state of all DCs in the forest, use the show active-directory status command.
For AD forests with two-way-trust relationships, where clients from one forest are allowed to access CIFS services from the other forest, you can use the kerberos auto-realm-traversal command to automatically discover all such trust relationships. Alternatively, you can use the active-directory forest-trust command to declare a forest-to-forest trust relationship in the ARX configuration.
bstnA# active-directory update forest wells.me.org proxy-user ny_admin
bstnA# active-directory update forest vt.com proxy-user ny_admin tentative
bstnA# show reports active-directory-wells.me.org.rpt
Use the child-domain command to manually add a child domain (or one of its DCs) to an Active Directory forest.
If this domain has no children of its own, you can use no child-domain to remove it. You can also use no child-domain to remove a redundant DC from the child domains configuration.
child-domain domain-name dc [preferred]
no child-domain domain-name dc
domain-name (1-256 characters) is the child domain name. This must be in the same domain namespace as its parent domain; for example, if the parent domain is nonprofit.org, this child domain could be mycharity.nonprofit.org.
dc is the IP address (for example, 192.168.25.56) of the domain controller (DC) for this child domain. If redundant DCs are hosting the domain, repeat this command (using the same domain-name) with the address of the redundant dc.
preferred (optional) declares that you prefer to use this DC over others in the same domain. Whenever the ARX Kerberos process chooses from multiple DCs in the same domain, it chooses from the DCs labeled preferred first.
This command may not be necessary if you use active-directory update seed-domain to automatically discover all child domains in the AD forest.
A child domain must have a parent, which must be the forest root (forest-root), a tree domain (tree-domain), or another child domain. As stated earlier, the child-domain name must begin with the name of its parent domain.
Redundant DCs may manage a child domain. Re-use the child-domain command (with the same domain name) for each redundant DC. If you prefer to use one or more DCs in the domain over the others, use the preferred flag to identify those DCs. The Kerberos process selects its active DCs from the preferred list. The process only stops using a DC if its connection fails; the kerberos health-check threshold command selects a timeout threshold for DC connections. The Kerberos process does not choose any DC outside the preferred list unless all of the preferred DCs have timed out. You can use show active-directory status to see which DCs are currently active for each domain.
To remove a DC from the preferred list, you can re-run the child-domain command without the optional preferred flag. You can use this flag to change the active DC at any time.
There are two circumstances under which you can use no child-domain: the domain has no child domains under it, or the domain has one or more redundant DCs configured and you want to remove one of them.
bstnA(gbl-forest[sierra])# child-domain ne.sierra.acopia.com 10.5.2.1
bstnA(gbl-forest[sierra])# child-domain ne.sierra.acopia.com 10.5.2.14 preferred
bstnA(gbl-forest[sierra])# child-domain ne.sierra.acopia.com 10.5.2.14
Use the forest-root command to identify the forest-root domain (or one of its domain controllers) in the Active-Directory forest.
Use the no form of the command to remove the forest root, or one of the redundant domain controllers (DCs) that manages it.
forest-root domain-name dc [preferred]
no forest-root domain-name dc
domain-name (1-256 characters) is the domain name for the forest root.
dc is the IP address (for example, 192.168.25.56) of the forest roots DC. If redundant DCs are hosting the root domain, repeat this command (using the same domain-name) with the address of each redundant dc.
preferred (optional) declares that you prefer to use this DC over others in the same domain. Whenever the ARX Kerberos process chooses from multiple DCs in the same domain, it chooses from the DCs labeled preferred first.
This command may not be necessary if you use active-directory update seed-domain to automatically discover all domains in the AD forest.
Adding a forest root is the second step in manually creating an Active Directory forest. The forest-root command identifies the root domain for the forest, and one DC that manages the domain. If redundant DCs manage the root domain, you can use the command once for each DC.
You can use child-domain to manually add one or more child domains to the forest root. The parent/child relationship between domains is established by their names: if mycountry.gov is the root domain, all of its child domains must reside in that domain (for example, mystate.mycountry.gov or myprovince.mycountry.gov, but not otherstate.org).
To add a disjoint tree of domains, use the tree-domain command. This is a tree of domains that is outside the root domain, but has a trust relationship with the domains in the forest roots tree. Just as with the forest root, you can use the child-domain command to add child domains to any tree domain.
If multiple DCs are configured to manage the forest root, you can use no forest-root to remove one of them at any time. Otherwise, the no forest-root command removes the entire root domain. To remove the forest-root domain, it cannot have any child domains, no CIFS services can be joined to the domain (through domain-join), and there can be no forest-trust relationships between this forest and any other forest (using no active-directory forest-trust).
If redundant DCs manage a domain, you can choose the DC(s) that you prefer for active use. Re-use the forest-root command (with the same domain name) for each redundant DC. You can use the optional preferred flag to identify preferred DCs. The Kerberos process uses DCs from the preferred list whenever possible. The process only stops using a DC if its connection times out; the kerberos health-check threshold command selects the timeout threshold. The Kerberos process does not choose any DC outside the preferred list unless all of the preferred DCs have timed out. You can use show active-directory status to see which DCs are currently active for each domain, including the forest-root domain.
To remove a DC from the preferred list, you can re-run the forest-root command without the optional preferred flag. You can use this flag to change the active DC at any time.
bstnA(gbl-forest[siera])# forest-root siera.acopia.com 10.5.1.23 preferred
bstnA(gbl-forest[siera])# forest-root siera.acopia.com 10.5.1.23
This command is relevant to an NTLM Secure Agent, which is only necessary behind a cifs service that uses unconstrained delegation (or is not joined to its domain). Best practices dictate that you use constrained delegation, as described in the domain-join documentation, and avoid this CLI mode and command.
At an installation that uses NTLM or NTLMv2 with unconstrained delegation, the ARX uses the Secure Agent as an NTLM proxy. You install the Secure-Agent software on a Windows DC (domain controller). When a client accesses CIFS on the ARX, the switch forwards the NTLM-authentication request to the Secure Agent. The Secure Agent accesses the password database on the Windows DC, and it tells the ARX whether or not the authentication succeeded.
ip address server-address
server-address (0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255) is the IP address of the Secure Agents DC.
Use the no form of the command to remove the IP address/host.
Use this command to specify the IP address of the DC that runs an instance of Secure Agent. You can use the port command to specify the port at which the Secure Agent listens, assuming this port was also changed at the Secure Agent interface. See the ARX Secure Agent Installation Guide for more information about the Secure Agent.
gffstnA(gbl)# ntlm-auth-server ggh-dc
gffstnA(gbl-ntlm-auth-srv[ggh-dc])# ip address 192.168.25.109
On a Windows domain controller (DC), you can configure a forest-to-forest trust with Selective Authentication, where you list the clients in Forest A who have access privileges in Forest B. If the ARX is in Forest B, these privileged clients cannot use its services unless you enable auto-realm traversal on the ARX. Auto-realm traversal is an ARX algorithm that supports selective authentication. Auto-realm traversal also allows automatic support of all forest-to-forest trusts in your Active Directory, without explicitly stating them in the ARX configuration. This is a recommended feature.
You can use the no kerberos auto-realm-traversal command to stop supporting this feature, and make it impossible for clients to authenticate from an external forest with a Selective Authentication policy. This is not generally advisable, and should only be done on the advice of F5 Support.
If you choose to disable this feature, you can use the active-directory forest-trust command to inform the ARX of each forest-to-forest trust in your network. However, clients cannot connect to the ARX through a forest-to-forest trust with selective authentication.
bstnA(gbl)# kerberos auto-realm-traversal
Use the no form of the command to return to the default response time.
milliseconds (optional 500-10,000) is the maximum amount of time allowed for a DC response.
prtlndA(gbl)# kerberos health-check threshold 5000
stoweA(gbl)# no kerberos health-check threshold
Kerberos authentication requires accurate DNS configuration for all CIFS services. To facilitate this, CIFS services can use dynamic DNS to register their host names with your DNS servers and update those servers whenever their hostname-to-IP mapping changes. Use the name-server command to identify a dynamic-DNS name server.
You can use no name-server to remove a name server.
name-server domain-name ip-address
no name-server domain-name ip-address
domain-name (1-255 characters) is the name of the AD domain that is supported by the name server, below.
ip-address is the IP address of the name server. This is frequently the same as the DC that manages the domain, identified with forest-root, child-domain, or tree-domain.
We recommend that every domain in the AD forest has at least one name server configured. (The show active-directory command shows all domains in an AD forest.) If a domains DNS records do not correctly identify a front-end CIFS service, the domains Windows clients cannot use Kerberos to authenticate with it.
From gbl-cifs mode, use dynamic-dns to DNS-register the front-end CIFS service. A CIFS service only registers with a name server when it is enabled (with enable (gbl-cifs, gbl-nfs)).
bstnA(gbl-forest[siera])# name-server siera.acopia.com 10.5.1.23
bstnA(gbl-forest[siera])# name-server siera.acopia.com 10.5.1.29
bstnA(gbl-forest[siera])# no name-server siera.acopia.com 10.5.1.29
This command is only necessary behind a cifs service that uses unconstrained delegation (or is not joined to its domain). Best practices dictate that you use constrained delegation, as described in the domain-join documentation, and avoid this CLI command.
Use the ntlm-auth-db command to instantiate a new NTLM authentication database.
name (1-64 characters) is a name that you choose for the Windows NTLM authentication demo database.
Use the no form of the command to remove an NTLM authentication database.
This command puts you into gbl-ntlm-auth-db mode, where you configure the NTLM demo database parameters. Use the user (gbl-ntlm-auth-db) command to configure up to 10 users/encrypted passwords associated with the NTLM authentication demo database. You need one valid username/password for each supported client (up to 10).
If you remove an authentication database with the no form of the command, clients cannot access CIFS shares in a namespace that uses the database.
bstnA(gbl)# ntlm-auth-db MYDEMO
bstnA(gbl)# no ntlm-auth-db OLDDEMO
This command is only necessary behind a cifs service that uses unconstrained delegation (or is not joined to its domain). Best practices dictate that you use constrained delegation, as described in the domain-join documentation, and avoid this CLI command.
Use the no form of the command to remove a Secure-Agent-server configuration from the switch.
name (1-128 characters) is a name that you choose for the Secure Agent server. Create a Secure Agent server for each DC that hosts a Secure Agent.
Note: If the front-end CIFS Service uses constrained delegation, introduced with Windows Server 2003, the Secure Agent (and this command) is unnecessary. An administrator with Domain Administrator privileges can go to the DC and configure constrained delegation for this CIFS service. You can use the probe delegate-to command to find all back-end filers behind a CIFS service, which the DC administrator adds to the CIFS services delegate-to list. Once the CIFS service is set up this way at the DC, the services clients can authenticate with NTLM, NTLMv2, and/or Kerberos.
Use the ip address (gbl-ntlm-auth-srv) command to enter the IP address of the DC running the Secure Agent.
Use the port command to assign a port on which the Secure Agent listens for authentication requests from the switch.
Use the windows-domain (gbl-ntlm-auth-srv) command to associate a domain name with this NTLM authentication server. This is a Windows domain that is managed by the servers DC host. Use the exact domain name that clients use for authentication.
Use the password command to provide the password for accessing the Secure Agent authentication server.
After you configure the servers attributes, you assign it to one or more namespaces. Use the ntlm-auth-server (gbl-ns) command in gbl-ns mode to assign an NTLM-authentication server to a namespace. The Secure Agent assists the namespace with NTLM/NTLMv2 authentication for its CIFS clients. You can assign multiple NTLM-authentication servers to a single namespace, and you can assign a single NTLM-authentication server to multiple namespaces.
If you remove a Secure Agent server with the no form of the command, NTLM/NTLMv2 clients cannot access CIFS shares in a namespace that uses this Secure Agent instance. Kerberos authentication is unaffected, though a fall-back to any version of NTLM fails if there is no Secure Agent for the requested domain.
The namespaces proxy-user (used for autonomous volume operations, such as import and file migrations) does not require an NTLM server to authenticate.
For more information about Secure Agent, see the ARX Secure Agent Installation Guide.
gffstnA(gbl)# ntlm-auth-server ggh-dc
bstnA(gbl)# no ntlm-auth-server dc1
This command is relevant to an NTLM Secure Agent, which is only necessary behind a cifs service that uses unconstrained delegation (or is not joined to its domain). Best practices dictate that you use constrained delegation, as described in the domain-join documentation, and avoid this CLI mode and command.
At an installation that uses NTLM or NTLMv2 authentication with unconstrained delegation, the ARX uses the Secure Agent as an NTLM proxy. Use this command to enter a password to be shared by the Secure Agent and the ARX. The Secure Agent and the ARX use this password to verify each others identity when they first establish a TCP connection.
The switch uses Secure Agent software to assist in CIFS authentication requests received from clients to back-end CIFS storage devices. See the ARX Secure Agent Installation Guide for information about installing and managing Secure Agent software.
gffstnA(gbl)# ntlm-auth-server ggh-dc
Password: ********
A Windows-management-authorization (WMA) group is a list of Windows clients who can use Windows-management applications (such as MMC or snapshots) in one or more namespaces. The permit command establishes a permissible management action for the current WMA group.
Use no permit to remove a permission from the group.
share | session | open-file | snapshot | all chooses the object of this permission:
share selects CIFS-service shares, as well as non-shared volumes that are eligible to be added as CIFS shares. With any permissions (see below), members of this group can add and delete shares, too.
session represents client sessions that are currently connected to the CIFS service. A member client can potentially see all other client sessions if the group has the monitor permission (below). With the any permission, the members can also potentially disconnect other clients.
open-file chooses open files. If this has monitor permission, a group member can see these files; with any permission, a member can close files, too.
snapshot selects the directory for accessing a volumes snapshots. WMA group members, when they access the volume through CIFS, can only see the snapshot directory if you set the monitor permission for this. The any permission has the same effect.
all selects all of the above.
monitor | any shows what the member clients can do with the object(s):
monitor allows read-only access. This limits group members to listing (not changing) a CIFS services shares, sessions, open files and/or snapshots.
any allows read-write access, so that member clients add, delete, close, and/or shut down the objects as appropriate. This has no additional affect on snapshots, which can only be monitored.
Use the show windows-mgmt-auth command to display the configuration for a WMA group.
To apply a WMA group to a namespace, use windows-mgmt-auth (gbl-ns). You can apply multiple groups to the same namespace. Any CIFS service in front of this namespace uses these WMA groups if it has remote management/browsing enabled. From gbl-cifs mode, use browsing to enable remote management/browsing for a CIFS service.
(The permit session all command also works for MMC.)
bstnA(gbl-mgmt-auth[readOnly])# permit session monitor
This command is relevant to an NTLM Secure Agent, which is only necessary behind a cifs service that uses unconstrained delegation (or is not joined to its domain). Best practices dictate that you use constrained delegation, as described in the domain-join documentation, and avoid this CLI mode and command.
At an installation that uses NTLM or NTLMv2 authentication with unconstrained delegation, the ARX uses the Secure Agent as an NTLM proxy. Use this command to enter the TCP port (number) on which Secure Agent listens for authentication requests from the switch.
Use the no form of the command to remove the current port number.
port port
port (optional; 1-65535) is the port number on which Secure Agent listens for authentication requests from the switch.
gffstnA(gbl)# ntlm-auth-server ggh-dc
This command is relevant to an NTLM authentication database, which is only necessary behind a cifs service that uses unconstrained delegation (or is not joined to its domain). Best practices dictate that you use constrained delegation, as described in the domain-join documentation.
name (1-64 characters) is the name of an NTLM authentication demo database.
With the name argument, the command shows the username(s) and namespace(s) that use this database.
Use the user (gbl-ntlm-auth-db) command to add a user to the database.
Use the ntlm-auth-db (gbl-ns) command to assign the database to a namespace.
bstnA> show ntlm-auth-db
bstnA> show ntlm-auth-db ntlmMap2
This command is relevant to an NTLM authentication server, which is only necessary behind a cifs service that uses unconstrained delegation (or is not joined to its domain). Best practices dictate that you use constrained delegation, as described in the domain-join documentation.
At an installation that does not support constrained delegation, the ARX uses the Secure Agent as an NTLM/NTLMv2 proxy. Use the show ntlm-auth-server command to display the configuration and statistics from one or more configured Secure Agent servers.
show ntlm-auth-server [name] [detailed]
name (optional, 1-128 characters) is the name of a Secure Agent server instance. If no name is specified, this command shows statistics for all configured Secure Agent servers.
detailed (optional) generates detailed output, with success and failure counts from all current connections to the Secure Agent(s).
Name is the name of this Secure Agent server instance, as configured with the ntlm-auth-server command.
Version identifies the Software Release of the Secure Agent software.
Server is the IP address of the Secure Agent server host system. If this is incorrect, you can use the ip address (gbl-ntlm-auth-srv) command to change it.
Domain Name is the associated Windows Domain. If this is incorrect, you can use the windows-domain (gbl-ntlm-auth-srv) command to correct it.
Pre-Win2k Domain is the short name of the above domain, for domains that existed before the release of Windows 2000. As above, you can use the windows-domain (gbl-ntlm-auth-srv) command to correct this in the ARX database.
Capabilities is NTLM, NTLM, NTLMv2, Session Key, or Unknown. The Session Key flag indicates that the Secure Agent can support SMB signing (see cifs filer-signatures and signatures).
Status is one of the following:
Reachable is the status for a healthy Secure Agent.
Unreachable indicates a connection problem. Check the connection to the Secure Agent with show exports, expect traceroute, and/or ping.
Password Mismatch means that the password configured at the ARX (with the password command) is different from the password configured in the Secure Agents management applet. The ARX Secure Agent Installation Guide explains how to reset the password at the Secure Agents management applet.
The detailed keyword causes the command to download detailed statistics from the Secure Agent(s). These are high-level statistics followed by a table of counters for every current connection to a Secure Agent. If you selected all Secure Agents, a separate SECURE AGENT STATISTICS page appears for each of them. The high-level statistics include the following:
Agent IP is the IP address of the Secure Agents host DC.
Agent Port is the TCP port where the Secure Agent is listening for ARX queries.
Uptime shows the amount of time since the last restart of the Secure Agent application.
Current Connections is the number of ARX systems currently connected to the Secure Agent.
Successful connection attempts summarize the connection statistics.
Account Scan Interval is the time between scans of the DCs SAM database, in seconds. The Secure Agent uses this scanned data to assist the ARX with its NTLM/NTLMv2 authentications.
Software Version is the release number for the Secure Agent software.
Capabilities is NTLM, NTLM, NTLMv2, Session Key, or Unknown., as above.
Connection #1 lists specific details about the first connection to the server including the source IP address, bytes transmitted, successful or failed client authentications, and filer response generation statistics. The client in these statistics is an ARX (typically, the current ARX), and the Source IP in the output is the ip proxy-address that the ARX used to connect to the Secure Agent.
Connection #2, and any additional connections shown, list details specific to that connection to the server.
gffstnA> show ntlm-auth-server
gffstnA> show ntlm-auth-server ggh-dc
gffstnA> show ntlm-auth-server detailed
gffstnA> show ntlm-auth-server
gffstnA> show ntlm-auth-server ggh-dc
gffstnA> show ntlm-auth-server detailed
A Windows-management-authorization (WMA) group is a list of Windows clients with permissions to use Windows-management applications (such as MMC). Use this command to show the members and permissions for this type of group.
name (optional; 1-64 characters) is the name of a specific WMA group.
Windows Authorization Policy is the name of the WMA group, specified in the windows-mgmt-auth command.
Domain Name describe one client in the group. Use user (gbl-mgmt-auth) to add or remove a client. If there is a pre-Windows 2000 name for the domain, it appears in the Domain Name field in parentheses.
Managed Object is Share, Session, Open-file, Snapshot, or All. The permission (below) applies to this is the type of object.
Permitted Operation is Monitor or Any. Monitor means that WMA-group clients can view the Managed Objects (shares, client sessions, open-files, or snapshots). Any means that the clients can change them, too (except snapshots, which are always read-only). Use permit (gbl-mgmt-auth) to add or remove a permission.
bstnA> show windows-mgmt-auth
bstnA> show windows-mgmt-auth fullAccess
bstnA> show windows-mgmt-auth
bstnA> show windows-mgmt-auth fullAccess
Use the no form of the command to remove a tree domain, or one of the redundant DCs that manages it.
tree-domain domain-name dc [preferred]
no tree-domain domain-name dc
domain-name (1-256 characters) is the tree domain name. This does not require any parent in the forest.
dc is the IP address (for example, 192.168.25.56) of the domain controller (DC) for the tree domain. If redundant DCs are hosting the domain, repeat this command (using the same domain-name) with the address of the redundant dc.
preferred (optional) declares that you prefer to use this DC over others in the same domain. Whenever the ARX Kerberos process chooses from multiple DCs in the same domain, it chooses from the DCs labeled preferred first.
This command may not be necessary if you use active-directory update seed-domain to automatically discover all child domains in the AD forest. Before you use this command, use the above command (or forest-root) to add a root to the Active Directory forest.
The tree-domain command adds a disjoint tree to the forest, outside of the forests domain namespace. For example, if the forest has a root domain of telco.com with two child domains, na.telco.com and asia.telco.com, you could establish a tree domain outside the namespace, myphone.org. The tree domain is presumed to have a two-way-transitive-trust relationship with one of the domains in the root forest.
If redundant DCs manage the tree domain, re-use the tree-domain command (with the same Domain name) for each redundant DC. If you prefer to use one or more DCs in the domain over the others, use the preferred flag to identify those DCs. The Kerberos process uses the DC(s) from the preferred list as its active DC(s). The process only stops using a DC if its connection times out; the kerberos health-check threshold command selects the timeout threshold. The Kerberos process does not choose any DCs outside the preferred list unless all of the preferred DCs have timed out. You can use show active-directory status to see which DCs are currently active for each domain.
To remove a DC from the preferred list, you can re-run the tree-domain command without the optional preferred flag. You can use this flag to change the active DC at any time.
You can use the child-domain command to add a child to this tree domain. The parent/child relationship is created through the domain names (aparent.com can be the parent to achild.aparent.com).
If the tree is managed by redundant DCs, you can use no tree-domain to remove one of them from the configuration. Otherwise, the no command removes the tree domain entirely; you must remove all of the trees child domains before you can do this.
bstnA(gbl-forest[medarch])# tree-domain ne.medarch.org 172.16.124.73 preferred
bstnA(gbl-forest[medarch])# tree-domain ne.medarch.org 172.16.124.73
A Windows-management-authorization (WMA) group is a list of Windows clients with permissions to use remote Windows-management applications, such as MMC. The user command adds a client to the current WMA group.
Use no user to remove a user from the group.
user name windows-domain fqdn [pre-win2k-name old-style-domain]
no user name windows-domain domain-name
name (1-64 characters) is a valid Windows user.
domain-name (1-64 characters) is the users domain name, exactly as the client types it for authentications. We recommend using the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) for this field. If the client uses the FQDN (such as mygroup.org) to authenticate, they can use Kerberos; if the client uses the older NetBIOS name from the first part of the FQDN (such as MYGROUP), the client can only use some form of NTLM.
old-style-domain (optional, 1-15 bytes, no periods) is the legacy, NetBIOS name of the Windows domain, if it is different from the default (below). The default should suffice for most situations; this option should only rarely be necessary. Clients who authenticate with this pre-Windows 2000 name can also use MMC; for example, if the pre-Windows 2000 name is GROUP for the mygroup.org domain, an MMC client could authenticate as GROUP/juser or mygroup.org/juser.
old-style-domain - The old-style name discovered with active-directory update seed-domain. If the old-style name was never discovered for this domain, the ARX uses the first part (before the first ., up to 15 characters) of the FQDN in the domain-name.
Depending on the management permissions for the group, they may be able to add new shares, view open files, and/or disconnect other client sessions. Use the permit (gbl-mgmt-auth) command to set the specific permissions for this group. Use this command multiple times to add multiple users to the group.
Use the show windows-mgmt-auth command to display the configuration for a WMA group.
To apply a WMA group to a namespace, use windows-mgmt-auth (gbl-ns). You can apply multiple groups to the same namespace. Use browsing to enable Windows management for a CIFS service.
bstnA(gbl-mgmt-auth[fullAccess])# user jquser windows-domain MEDARCH.ORG
bstnA(gbl-mgmt-auth[readOnly])# no user test5 windows-domain MEDARCH.ORG
This command is relevant to an NTLM authentication database, which is only necessary behind a cifs service that uses unconstrained delegation (or is not joined to its domain). Best practices dictate that you use constrained delegation, as described in the domain-join documentation, and avoid this CLI mode and command.
user dbuser
no user dbuser
dbuser (1-64 characters) is one authorized Windows user.
Password: ********
This command is relevant to an NTLM Secure Agent, which is only necessary behind a cifs service that uses unconstrained delegation (or is not joined to its domain). Best practices dictate that you use constrained delegation, as described in the domain-join documentation, and avoid this CLI mode and command.
At an installation that uses NTLM or NTLMv2 with unconstrained delegation, the ARX uses the Secure Agent as an NTLM proxy. Use this command to assign the domain name to a Secure Agent server.
Use the no form of the command to remove the domain name for this Secure Agent, thereby disabling it.
windows-domain domain-name [pre-win2k-name old-style-domain]
domain-name (1-64 characters) is the Windows Domain to which you assign a Secure Agent instance (authentication server). When a client authenticates to an ARX CIFS service, the client uses this Secure Agent if they use this domain name.
old-style-domain (optional, 1-15 characters, no periods) is the name of the legacy Windows domain, if it is different from the default (below). The default should suffice for most situations; this option should only rarely be necessary. Clients who authenticate with the pre-Windows 2000 name can also use this Secure Agent.
old-style-domain - The old-style name discovered with active-directory update seed-domain. If the old-style name was never discovered for this domain, the ARX assumes that the old-style name is the first part (before the first ., up to 15 characters) of the FQDN in the domain-name.
For domains with a completely-different pre-Win2k name, such as GUARD3 as an the early name for porthos, use the pre-win2k-name option. The separate authentication server should use the same ip address (gbl-ntlm-auth-srv) to point to the same DC.
If you remove the domain name with the no form of this command, clients cannot access CIFS shares in a namespace that uses this instance of Secure Agent.
gffstnA(gbl)# ntlm-auth-server serverFQDN
gffstnA(gbl-ntlm-auth-srv[serverFQDN])# windows-domain ggh.medarch.org
A Windows-management-authorization (WMA) group is a list of Windows clients with permissions to use Windows-management applications (such as MMC) in one or more CIFS namespaces. Use the windows-mgmt-auth command to create a WMA group.
Use no windows-mgmt-auth to remove a WMA group.
name (1-64 characters) is a name you choose for the group.
This command places you in gbl-mgmt-auth mode, where you then add one or more Windows clients and the management permissions for all of them. Use the user (gbl-mgmt-auth) command to add a Windows user to the group. Use the permit (gbl-mgmt-auth) command to add management permissions for these users, such as permission to add CIFS shares, close CIFS files, or view snapshot directories from Windows.
Use the show windows-mgmt-auth command to display the configuration for a WMA group.
To apply a WMA group to a namespace, use windows-mgmt-auth (gbl-ns). You can apply multiple groups to the same namespace. Use browsing to enable Windows management for a CIFS service.
bstnA(gbl)# windows-mgmt-auth fullAccess
bstnA(gbl)# no windows-mgmt-auth testMMC
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