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Manual Chapter: Filesets
Manual Chapter
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This chapter contains an alphabetical list of commands for configuring a fileset, a group of files in a managed volume. You can use the commands in this chapter to create filesets based on file name, age, directory path, and various other criteria.
Use the age-fileset command to create a simplified age-based fileset for the current volume.
name (1-1024 characters) is the name you choose for the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.) This places you in gbl-ns-vol-fs-age mode, where you use several commands to define the fileset. You must use the select-files (...-fs-age) command to choose files older than (and/or newer than) 1 hour, 2 days, 20 minutes, or some other interval; this establishes the age. To determine whether the age is based on the last time the files were accessed or the last time they were modified, use the last command.
Use the every command to determine the how frequently the current age fileset re-selects its files.
Use no every to select files only when a policy rule (such as a place-rule or a shadow-copy-rule) invokes the fileset.
every count {minutes|hours|days|weeks|months|quarters|years}
count (1-2,147,483,647) is the number of minutes, hours, days, etc. between file selections. For example, every 2 minutes or every 5 minutes.
minutes| ... years is a required choice.
sunday| ... saturday causes the fileset select its files weekly, on the given day of the week.
This command is deprecated in favor of controlling age selection from the rules schedule. Consider instead using the schedule (gbl-ns-vol-plc) command (for a file-placement rule) or the schedule (gbl-ns-vol-shdwcp) command (for a shadow-copy rule). These assign a schedule to the rule. Every time the assigned schedule fires, the rule reassesses the age-based fileset from the scheduled time. For example, if the schedule fires on 11/12, a month-old file is one that was modified before 10/12; if the schedule fires again in 11/13, a month-old file is one that was modified before 10/13. This command creates a different schedule for file assessment. To continue the example, all month-old files may remain the ones modified before 10/12 for a long time, as determined by the algorithm described below.
4.
If the same fileset was evaluated every 2 days, the progression would look like this:
4.
The no every command resets this command and start at the same time: it makes the fileset select its files whenever a rule invokes the fileset.
Use the filename-fileset command to create a name-based fileset for the current namespace volume.
Use the no form of the command to delete a name-based fileset.
name (1-1024 characters) is a required name that you assign to the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.) This places you in gbl-ns-vol-fs-name mode where you can define the fileset by choosing file names (with name), one or more directory paths within the volume, and/or an option to match files recursively (recurse). By default, a new file-name fileset matches all files in the volumes root directory, but not below it.
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[ns~/])# filename-fileset logs
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[ns~/])# no filename-fileset logs
Use the filesize-fileset command to create a size-based fileset for the current volume.
name (1-1024 characters) is the name you choose for the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.) This places you in gbl-ns-vol-fs-filesize mode, where you use the select-files (...-fs-filesize) command to choose the size range for the filesets files.
Use the from fileset command to include a component fileset into the current union or intersection fileset.
Use the no from command to remove a component fileset from the current fileset.
[no] from fileset fileset-name
fileset-name (1-1024 characters) is the name of an existing source fileset.
all (optional) removes all source filesets from the union or intersection fileset.
The no from all command removes all source filesets at once.
bstnA(gbl-fs-union[bulky])# from fileset fm_pdf
bstnA(gbl-fs-union[bulky])# from fileset veryLarge
Use the intersection-fileset command to create an intersection fileset in the current namespace volume. An intersection fileset contains all files that are common to all of its source filesets.
Use the no form of the command to delete the intersection fileset.
name (1-1024 characters) is the name you choose for the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.)
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[ns~/vol])# intersection-fileset xmlViaFtp
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[archives~/etc])# no intersection-fileset isectTst
Use the last command to set the type of timestamp to use for age-based grouping: last-accessed time or last-modified time.
accessed | modified is a required choice:
accessed is the last-accessed (read) time.
modified is the last-modified (written) time.
Use the name command to select a file name or names for the current name-based fileset.
Use no name to erase the selection, thereby matching any file name.
name exact [not] file-name [ignore-case]
name match [not] wild-card-string [ignore-case]
name regexp [not] regular-expression [ignore-case]
not (optional) negates the match; this causes the fileset to include all files in the filesets path except any files that match.
exact file-name (1-1024 characters) is an exact file name to match.
ignore-case (optional) tells the rule to match files without paying attention to case (for example, name exact index.html ignore-case matches index.html and Index.HTML).
match wild-card-string (1-1024 characters) uses a wild-card pattern to match multiple file names. See the Guidelines below for your wildcard options.
regexp regular-expression (1-1024 characters) uses a more-complex match pattern, based on the ICU standard for regular expressions. This also requires the quotation marks. See the Guidelines below for regular-expression syntax.
You can use the path command (for example, path exact /var/log) to select a particular directory. You can optionally use the recurse to descend from a path into its subdirectories.
The no form of this command makes the fileset match all files in the filesets path(s).
The wild-card-string uses the following Unix-like shell conventions:
* is any string of 0 (zero) or more characters, including an empty string.
? is any single character, or no character.
[...] matches any one of the enclosed characters. For example, [xyz] matches x, y, or z.
[a-z] matches any character in the sorted range, a through z.
[^...] or [!...] matches any character that is not enclosed. For example, [!xyz] matches any character except x, y, or z.
The regular-expression syntax follows IBMs ICU conventions. You can use this expression to be extremely specific about your match criteria. At a high level, these are the conventions for ICU regular expressions:
.* matches any string, including the null string.
.? matches any single character, or no character.
[...] matches any one of the enclosed characters.
[a-z] matches any character in the sorted range, a through z.
[^...] matches any character that is not enclosed.
\d matches any digit, 1-9.
\s matches any white-space character.
\ matches the next character, even if that character is a special character (for example, \? is a literal ?; it is not interpreted).
^... and ...$ match the beginnings and ends of lines, respectively.
expression1 | expression2 matches both expressions.
For more details, refer to Regular Expression Syntax of the ARX® CLI Storage-Management Guide. Also, you can search the World-Wide Web for instructions on ICU regular expressions.
bstnA(gbl-fs-name[noHTML])# name match not .htm?
matches all files except those with .htm or .htmx (where x could be any single character) in their names.
A large-scale file migration could restore a large number of offline files all at once, possibly enough to run out of disk space on the back-end CIFS server. You can use the offline command to choose files based on the setting for their offline attribute. You can then exclude files with a raised offline attribute from a place-rule migration.
set | not-set | ignore is a required choice:
set indicates that files in this fileset are all offline. We do not generally recommend migrating files (see place-rule) with the offline attribute set. The files behavior is dependent on the back-end file server and the HSM; they may or may not restore the full file first. Additionally, assuming that the migration causes the file to be restored first, the change in the file may trigger a higher-priority rule and cancel the migration.
not-set matches only files that are online.
ignore matches all files, no matter how the offline attribute is set.
no offline is equivalent to offline ignore.
Use the path command to choose one or more directories for the current named-based fileset.
Use no path to revert to the default path.
path exact [not] dir-path [ignore-case]
path match [not] wild-card-string [ignore-case]
path regexp [not] regular-expression [ignore-case]
not (optional) negates the match; this causes the fileset to search all paths in the volume except any paths that match.
dir-path (1-1024 characters) is an exact path to match.
ignore-case (optional) tells the rule to match paths without paying attention to case (for example, path exact /src ignore-case matches /src and /SRC).
match wild-card-string (1-1024 characters) uses wild cards to match multiple paths. See the Guidelines below for your wildcard options.
regexp regular-expression (1-1024 characters) uses a more-complex match pattern, based on the ICU standard for regular expressions. This also requires the quotation marks. See the Guidelines below for regular-expression syntax.
By default, this does not recurse; use the recurse command to include all matching subdirectories in the fileset, too. Note that the match and regexp options often create a recursive effect: for example, the path match /var/* command matches /var/, /var/log/, /var/log/httpd/, /var/www/, and any other subdirectory under /var/.
The path exact dir-path syntax identifies a single directory, and does not require a full volume scan. All other options (including not and ignore-case) may match multiple directories, so they require more time for a full scan.
The wild-card-string uses the following Unix-like shell conventions:
* is any string of 0 (zero) or more characters, including an empty string.
? is any single character.
Note: The * and the ? match any character, including a / (the Unix delimiter for directories). Therefore, path match /home/*/bin matches /home/juser/bin/ as well as /home/jrandom/misc/bin/.
[...] matches any one of the enclosed characters. For example, [xyz] matches x, y, or z.
[a-z] matches any character in the sorted range, a through z.
[^...] or [!...] matches any character that is not enclosed. For example, [!xyz] matches any character except x, y, or z.
The regular-expression syntax follows IBMs ICU conventions. You can use this expression to be extremely specific about your match criteria. At a high level, these are the conventions for ICU regular expressions:
.* matches any string, including the null string.
.? matches any single character.
[...] matches any one of the enclosed characters.
[a-z] matches any character in the sorted range, a through z.
[^...] matches any character that is not enclosed.
\d matches any digit, 1-9.
\s matches any white-space character.
\ matches the next character, even if that character is a special character (for example, \? is a literal ?; it is not interpreted).
^... and ...$ match the beginnings and ends of lines, respectively.
expression1 | expression2 matches both expressions.
For more details, refer to Regular Expression Syntax of the ARX® CLI Storage-Management Guide. Also, you can search the World-Wide Web for instructions on ICU regular expressions.
bstnA(gbl-fs-name[httpLogs])# path match /log ignore-case
bstnA(gbl-fs-name[noHid])# path regexp not /\.[^\.]
Use the policy-age-fileset command to create an age-based fileset for any volume.
name (1-1024 characters) is the name you choose for the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.) This places you in gbl-fs-age mode, where you use several commands to define the fileset. You must use the select-files (...-fs-age) command to choose files older than (and/or newer than) 1 hour, 2 days, 20 minutes, or some other interval; this establishes the age. To determine whether the age is based on the last time the files were accessed or the last time they were modified, use the last command.
An age fileset selects its files each time a rule uses it; you can alter this by setting a regular schedule for file selection. The optional every (...-fs-age) command sets the frequency of these file selections; by the time a rule invokes the fileset, its files are already selected based on an earlier, scheduled time. You can use the start command to set a start date (and time) for this fixed schedule (for example, start the every 10 minutes schedule at noon on January 1st). These commands are deprecated, however, in favor of letting the rules schedule determine file-selection schedule.
bstnA(gbl)# policy-age-fileset weekOld
bstnA(gbl)# no policy-age-fileset lastMonth
Use the policy-cifs-attributes-fileset command to create a fileset based on CIFS attributes. Some CIFS attributes can be important for file migrations, such as the offline attribute. The offline attribute indicates that the files full content is on a remote server, and would need to be fully restored before accessing it for migration. You can use this fileset to select files with particular CIFS attributes and carefully manage their migration.
name (1-1024 characters) is the name you choose for the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.) This places you in gbl-fs-cifs-attr mode, where you use the offline command to choose files based on the setting for their CIFS offline attribute.
You can combine this fileset with others using policy-union-fileset and policy-intersection-fileset. For example, to select all files with the offline attribute unset and in a particular directory, you can
define a set of online files with this command (policy cifs-attributes-fileset) and offline not-set,
bstnA(gbl)# policy-cifs-attributes-fileset online
bstnA(gbl)# no policy-filesize-fileset offline_not_set
Use the policy-filename-fileset command to create a name-based fileset for any volume.
Use the no form of the command to delete a name-based fileset.
name (1-1024 characters) is a required name that you assign to the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.) This command places you in gbl-fs-name mode where you can define the fileset by choosing file names (with name), one or more directory paths within the volume, and/or an option to descend into matching directories recursively (recurse). By default, a new file-name fileset matches all files in the volumes root directory, but not below it.
bstnA(gbl)# policy-filename-fileset logs
bstnA(gbl)# no policy-filename-fileset logs
Use the policy-filesize-fileset command to create a size-based fileset for any volume.
name (1-1024 characters) is the name you choose for the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.) This places you in gbl-fs-filesize mode, where you use the select-files (...-fs-filesize) command to choose files larger-than (and/or smaller-than) a size of your choosing.
bstnA(gbl)# policy-filesize-fileset midsize
bstnA(gbl)# no policy-filesize-fileset 1_to_4_gig
Use the policy-intersection-fileset command to create an intersection fileset. An intersection fileset contains all files that are common to all of its source filesets.
Use the no form of the command to delete the intersection fileset.
name (1-1024 characters) is the name you choose for the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.)
bstnA(gbl)# policy-intersection-fileset xmlViaFtp
bstnA(gbl)# no policy-intersection-fileset isectTst
Use the policy-union-fileset command to create a union fileset. A union fileset is the union of two or more component filesets.
Use the no form of the command to remove the union fileset.
name (1-1024 characters) is the name you choose for the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.) This places you in gbl-fs-union mode; from there, use the from fileset (gbl-...-fs-...) command to identify each source fileset.
bstnA(gbl)# policy-union-fileset allLogs
Use the recurse command to include all subdirectories in the current file-name fileset.
Use no recurse to include only files in the top directory.
If you use recurse in a fileset without any path or name specification, this selects all files in the volume.
A size-based fileset chooses a group of files based on their sizes. Use the select-files command to choose the sizes for the current fileset.
larger-than-or-equal-to | smaller-than is a required choice. This determines whether the selected files are larger or smaller than the size that follows.
size is the size in bytes, KiloBytes, MegaBytes, or whatever units you specify (see below).
k|M|G|T (optional) specifies units; k for KiloBytes (1024 bytes), M for MegaBytes (1024*1024 bytes), G for GigaBytes (1024*1024*1024), and T for TeraBytes (1024*1024*1024*1024). Do not put any space between the size number and this unit (for example, 100k is valid but 100 k is not). The default is bytes.
The select-files command is the only required step in configuring a size-based fileset.
You can use this command twice to define a size range (for example, to select files larger than 50 MegaBytes but smaller than 1 Gigabyte). The CLI rejects a select-files command that contradicts an existing select-files command: you cannot select files smaller-than 1 MegaByte if you have already selected files larger-than or equal-to 2 GigaBytes.
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol-fs-filesize[midsize])# select-files larger-than-or-equal-to 20M
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol-fs-filesize[midsize])# select-files smaller-than 50M
select-files {older-than | newer-than} interval {minutes | hours | days | weeks | months | quarters | years}
older-than | newer-than is a required choice. This determines whether the selected files are older or newer than the time interval that follows.
interval (1-2,147,483,647) is the number of minutes, hours, days, etc., that selected files are older than or newer than.
minutes | ... years is a required choice.
The select-files command is the only required step in configuring an age-based fileset. Without any selection criteria, the fileset includes all files.
You can use this command twice to define an age range (for example, to select files older than 1 week but newer than 1 year). The CLI rejects a select-files command that contradicts an existing select-files command: you cannot select files newer than 6 hours if you have already selected files older than 3 weeks.
By default, the policy engine runs this file selection whenever it is invoked by another rule (such as a place-rule or a shadow-copy-rule). For example, if the fileset is composed of files newer than 1 month and a file-placement rule uses it on September 30, it includes all files modified since August 31. If the file-placement rule runs again on October 5, the fileset re-selects its files: at this point, it holds all files modified since September 5, 1 month before October 5. You can use the every (...-fs-age) command to make the file re-selections happen at a fixed rate (for example, every 2 days).
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol-fs-age[ns~/vol~24hrs])# select-files older-than 24 hours
Use the show policy filesets command to view fileset configurations.
show policy filesets namespace namespace volume volume
fileset fileset-name
global-fileset fileset-name (optional, 1-1024 characters) focuses the command on a single, global fileset.
namespace namespace volume volume fileset fileset-name focuses on a single, volume-level fileset.
namespace (1-30 characters) is the filesets namespace,
volume (1-1024 characters) is the filesets volume path, and
fileset-name (1-1024 characters) is the fileset..
For each fileset, a single Configuration table shows all of the administratively-set parameters for the fileset. You can create or edit each fileset type with a separate command:
bstnA# show policy filesets
bstnA# show policy filesets global-fileset veryLarge
bstnA# show policy filesets namespace insur volume /claims fileset images
bstnA# show policy filesets
bstnA# show policy filesets global-fileset veryLarge
For age-based filesets, use the start command to set a start time for grouping files.
Use no start to select files each time a rule uses the fileset.
start [mm/dd/yyyy:HH:MM:SS]
mm/dd/yyyy sets a start date (for example, date 05/25/2003).
HH:MM:SS sets a start time (for example, 06:00:00).
This command is deprecated in favor of controlling age selection from the rules schedule. Consider instead using the schedule (gbl-ns-vol-plc) command (for a file-placement rule) or the schedule (gbl-ns-vol-shdwcp) command (for a shadow-copy rule). These assign a start time and a schedule to the rule. In most-all cases, it is more intuitive to let the rules schedule determine start times and file selections.
This command sets a starting point for all age-based calculations. For example, if you have a fileset that re-evaluates every 7 days, this determines the starting point and the time of day for each evaluation (Mondays at 2AM, Fridays at 5PM, or some other day and time).
bstnA(gbl-fs-age[monthOld])# start 05/06/2003:23:00:00
Use the union-fileset command to create a union fileset in the current namespace volume. A union fileset is the union of two or more component filesets.
Use the no form of the command to remove the union fileset.
name (1-1024 characters) is the name you choose for the fileset.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new fileset; enter yes to continue. (You can use terminal expert to eliminate confirmation prompts for creating new policy objects.) This places you in gbl-ns-vol-fs-union mode; from there, use the from fileset (gbl-...-fs-...) command to identify each source fileset.
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[ns~/vol])# union-fileset allLogs
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