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Manual Chapter: Chassis Management
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Namespace software and networking software record important log information, called metalog data, to be used by a redundant peer in the event of a failover. The ARX-1500 and ARX-2500 store their metalog data on internal disk partitions. You can use the show metalog usage command to view the usage of these metalog partitions over time. Use this command to clear the metalog-usage statistics for the current ARX.
The show metalog usage command shows up-to-date usage statistics for all metalog partitions in the ARX. Use this command to clear those usage statistics for the entire system.
The show metalog usage command is unavailable for a minute after you issue this command.
stoweA# clear metalog usage
reload (optional) causes the switch to come back online after halting. If you omit this option, the switch halts until you manually restore power.
The CLI prompts you with a warning before it clears the NVRAM. Enter yes to continue, then enter your username at the next prompt. The switch then halts. If you omitted the reload option, you must turn the power back on to restore the ARX to service.
(Optional) After clearing all namespaces with delete startup-config and rebooting. This eliminates stale namespace data in the NVRAM.
bstnA# clear nvr reload
Use the clock set command to set the time and/or date at the ARX.
clock set HH:MM:SS
clock set HH:MM:SS mm/dd/yyyy
HH:MM:SS is the time (for example, 06:00:00). Enter the local time, not the UTC time.
mm/dd/yyyy (optional) sets the date (for example, 12/31/2003 for the 31st of December, 2003).
This command is unnecessary if you use the ntp server command to synchronize the time to an accurate time source. An NTP server overrides the time you set with this command. For the reason stated above, NTP is strongly recommended.
Use the show clock command to view the current time and date setting.
bstnA# clock set 11:00:00
bstnA# clock set 23:30:00
bstnA# clock set 23:30:00 10/24/2004
Use the clock timezone command to set the time zone at the ARX.
clock timezone region city
clock timezone time-zone-name
region (1-64 characters) is the continent or ocean of the closet major city. Use <Tab> to see a list of possible options.
city (1-64 characters) is the closet major city. As above, use <Tab> to see a list of possible options.
time-zone-name (1-64 characters) is the name of the local time zone, if known (for example, EDT, EST, or CDT). The CLI uses this to look up the region and city. Many time-zone names are ambiguous; for example, CST maps to Central Standard Time, China Standard Time, and Australian Central Standard Time. The CLI chooses a region and city based on the current customer base. You can use show clock to see the chosen region and city.
offset (optional; -1400 to 1200) is the offset from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), in hours and minutes (for example, five hours back is -0500 and 7.5 hours forward is 0730). As with the time-zone-name, the CLI uses this to look up the region and city. Many offsets are ambiguous, too; they essentially choose a longitude, and many longitudes cross through multiple cities with different time-keeping rules. The CLI chooses a region and city based on the current customer base. After you set this number, you can use show clock to see the time zone that corresponds to the offset.
Use the show clock command to view the current time, date, and time zone settings.
bstnA# clock timezone America New_York
bstnA# clock timezone EDT
bstnA# clock timezone +0900
Use the dual-reboot command to simultaneously reboot both peers in a redundant pair. Use this command only on the advice of F5 Support.
prtlndB# dual-reboot
name (up to 32 characters) is the hostname that you choose for the ARX. Use only alpha-numeric characters (0-9, a-z, A-Z), hyphens (-), and/or periods (.), as specified in RFC 1035.
This is not the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) for the ARX; use the ip domain-list command to set one or more domains for the switch.
bstnA(cfg)# hostname usaax11
The no login-banner command removes the text string.
login-banner post-auth {message | configs msg-file}
message (1-2000 characters) is the string to show after a successful authentication. Quote this string if it contains any spaces.
configs msg-file (1-1024 characters) selects a file in the configs directory and uses its text. Use the show configs command for a list of files in the configs directory, and you can use the copy command to download a file to that directory. This file should be no more than 768 bytes.
bstnA(cfg)# login-banner post-auth Running-config last saved 1/7 by J. User
bstnA(cfg)# login-banner post-auth configs banner.txt
I/O Count is the number of I/O operations that the CLI ran.
Latency (usecs) is the average latency for all of those I/O operations, in micro-seconds.
The show redundancy metalog command shows similar statistics, but it applies to all platforms except the ARX-VE. The ARX-1500 and ARX-2500 store their metalog data on their internal disks. On those platforms, you can use the show metalog usage command to see the usage statistics for the internal metalog driver.
On all platforms, the namespace software keeps metalog read/write statistics. You can use the show statistics metalog command to see these metalog-usage statistics from a namespace-software perspective.
stkbrgA# probe metalog latency
Use the reload command to reboot the ARX. The ARX then comes up with the current armed software release. (By default, the armed release is the currently-running release; you can change it to a new release with the boot system command.)
collect-diags (optional) causes a diagnostic-collection process before the reload. This is useful for capturing the state of the ARX in case of a failure that requires further diagnosis.
reason (optional, 1-255 characters) is a comment you can enter to appear in syslog. This is useful when reviewing the logs during testing and diagnostics.
Enter yes to reboot.
Enter diags if you want to collect diagnostic information and then reboot. This is equivalent to using the collect-diags option in the command. The collected information is a subset of the information captured by the standard collect state command. After the ARX reloads, use collect diags to gather other relevant information (along with the data collected before reboot) and upload the full diagnostic package to F5 Support.
This command can be the final step for upgrading software on the switch. Use reload to restart all modules after you use boot system to arm the switch with a new release file. You can use show boot or show version to verify that the switch is armed with the desired release file.
If someone deleted the full configuration (with delete startup-config) before running this command, all configuration changes are lost after the ARX reloads. The CLI warns you of this and prompts for confirmation; you can enter no and run restore startup-config to preserve your configuration. To remove all configuration parameters, enter yes.
bstnA# reload
bstnA# reload collect-diags
bstnA# collect diag-info ftp://jpublic:jpwd@ftp.wwmed.com/diags
The resource profile of an ARX is the allocation of its processes amongst its CPU cores, where each CPU core is dedicated to one process type: system processes, fastpath processes, or volume-group processes. Software Release 6.2.0 introduced an optimized resource profile for the ARX-2500. An ARX-2500 with an earlier software release retains the legacy profile. The new, optimized profile is recommended. Use the no resource-profile legacy command to upgrade the resource profile on the current chassis.
On the advice of F5 personnel only, you can use resource-profile legacy to return to the legacy profile.
After you use this command, you must reload the ARX-2500 for the change to take effect. If you have a redundant pair of ARX-2500 devices (see redundancy), run this command on both peers and then use the dual-reboot command to reboot both of them at once.
The above is also true if you replay a running-config script with the resource-profile legacy setting. (One method of replaying a running-config is to save the file on the ARX-2500 and use the run command.) After replaying the config script, you must reload the ARX-2500 for resource-profile legacy to take effect.
You can use the show processors command to see the current resource profile on your chassis.
stoweA(cfg)# no resource-profile legacy
stoweA# reload
Use the show baudrate command to show the baud rate for the Console (serial) interface.
bstnA# show baudrate
Use the show chassis command to display chassis, disk, slot, module, port, and/or temperature information.
chassinfo | ... | nvr is an optional choice to focus on one group of chassis tables. If you omit this, the command shows all groups.
chassinfo - specifies chassis-related tables (as opposed to slot- or module-related) with high-level environment, disk, and power supply information.
private-subnet - displays the private subnet that the switch uses for inter-process communication in the chassis. Every chassis in the RON (see ron tunnel) must have a unique private subnet.
diskuse - displays disk usage and directories on the system drive.
slotinfo - focuses on the slots.
moduleinfo - shows model information and firmware versions for each module.
temperature - specifies a table of sensor temperatures.
metalog - is only available on the ARX-1500 and ARX-2500. This option shows the statistics for metalog-driver software on this chassis. The metalog driver records important recovery data for namespace software, and (in a redundant pair) copies the data to the peer ARX.
nvr - is only available on the ARX-500, ARX-2000, and ARX-4000. This option shows the NVRAM-battery state and whether or not there are any ECC errors. The ARX-1500 and ARX-2500 store their metalog data on the RAID instead of the NVRAM; use the metalog option (above) to monitor the metalog-protection mechanism for those device types.
summary - shows a summary of the chassis state.
The show chassis command displays several tables. You can focus on a smaller group of tables by using one of the optional keywords. Each group of tables is described in its own section, below.
The chassinfo section contains the following tables:
Identification the hostname and the Universally-Unique ID (UUID) for the chassis. Use hostname to change the hostname. You can only change the UUID through the initial-startup script.
Chassis shows the chassis type, a model number, hardware version (where applicable), and the serial number.
Chassis Environment contains the base MAC address for all modules (for a chassis with multiple modules, the individual modules MACs appear in moduleinfo), power status, fan status, and chassis temperature:
Power can be Online, Online Partial (one power supply is working, the other is absent), or Failed Partial (one is working, the other failed).
Fan(setting) shows the fan status and its speed setting. The fan status can be Online, Not Present, Fault (the fan tray failed), or Ctr Fail (the control to the fan-tray failed). The speed setting is in parentheses, and is high, medium, low, or Unk (unknown).
System Temp., CPU Temp. and CPU show the ambient chassis temperature, the temperature of the CPU chip, and the current CPU speed. This appears only for the platforms that support both ambient and CPU temperature readings (such as the ARX-2500). The System Temp can be Normal, Too high, or Failed (temperature monitoring failed), followed by both temperatures in Celsius.
The CPU speed is relevant because these chassis types automatically reduce the CPU speed if the temperature is too high. This shows the current CPU speed followed by an indication of whether or not the speed has been reduced; (Normal) means that the CPU is running at 100%, a percentage (such as 85%) indicates that the CPU has been throttled back.
Temperature appears for other chassis types. This is the same as the System Temp. described above.
Power Details appears for the ARX-1500, ARX-2000, ARX-2500, and ARX-4000, which have redundant power supplies. This has one row for each power supply showing the power-supply state (Online, Absent, or Failed).
This shows the VLAN (where applicable; for example, the ARX-VE uses only VLAN 1 and the ARX-1500 and ARX-2500 have no private VLAN, so this does not appear for those platforms), Subnet, and Subnet Mask for the private subnet on this chassis. You set this when you install the switch. You can reset it with ip private vlan or ip private subnet reassign. This subnet must be unique for all switches in a Resilient Overlay Network (RON); see ron tunnel for more information about a RON.
The first three tables only appear for a chassis with replaceable disks (any platform except the ARX-500 or the ARX-VE). The SATA Drive Details table appears for the ARX-500. The Disk Usage table appears for all chassis types.
Logical Disk Details shows the status of the RAID as a single, logical disk.
Disk is always 1. This represents the single, logical disk comprised of the disks in the table below.
Status is Optimal (both disks are working), Degraded (one disk failed or is degraded), Verifying n% (someone issued the raid verify command to verify disk integrity; the percentage shows the progress of the verification test), or Failed.
Verification Mode is Manual or Automatic, as set by the raid verification-mode command.
Verification Rate is the percentage of CPU that the RAID can use for verifying a disk. You can change this for manual verifications with raid verification-rate.
Disk Details shows the location and size of each disk, disk state, the data-transfer rate, and the model number.
Disk indicates the location of the physical disk: Bay 1 is on top of Bay 2 in all chassis types with replaceable disks.
Size is the full capacity of the disk.
State is Online, Degraded, (the disk may fail soon), Rebuild n% (someone used raid rebuild to add the disk to the RAID; the percentage shows the progress of the rebuild), Not Present, Failed, or Unknown.
Transfer Rate is the current throughput on the disks bus channel. This is negotiated at startup between the disk controller and the disks themselves. The next table shows the maximum rate allowed by the controller.
Model is the specific model number of the disk drive.
RAID Controller Details displays the current RAID settings.
Rebuild Rate is the percentage of CPU that the RAID can use for rebuilding a disk. You can change this with raid rebuild-rate.
Max Transfer Rate is the maximum throughput allowed on the disks bus channel.
Firmware is firmware version running on the disk controller.
RAID Alarm is Enabled or Disabled. You can disable the alarm with the raid silence command.
SATA Drive Details appears for an ARX-500 with a Serial ATA (SATA) disk drive.
Firmware is firmware version running on the disk.
Model and
Serial identify the disk drive.
Disk Usage shows the switchs software directories and their total space (in MB), used space (MB), free space (MB), and used percentage (%).
Slot Environment, the only table in the slotinfo group, shows each slots contents and status:
Slot is the location of the module in the chassis. This is1 (the control plane on the top half) or 2 (the data plane on the bottom) for the ARX-4000. It is always 1 for the ARX-500 or ARX-2000.
Type is ACM (for the control plane on top) or NSM (for the data plane on the bottom) on the ARX-4000. For the ARX-500 or ARX-2000, the single slot contains an ACM.
State is the current state of the module. This is one of the module states documented for the show version command; see Guidelines: Module States.
Power can be Online, Degraded, or Failed.
Temperature is the aggregate of all temperature-sensor readings in the module. This is either Normal or Too High, along with the current temperature range on the module.
NVR Battery appears for the NSM on the ARX-4000 or the ACM on the ARX-500 or ARX-2000. This is the battery status for Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM). The possible values in this field are Good, Missing, Charging, Testing, Degraded, or Failed. The NVRAM stores transaction logs from the ACM, which are critical for failure recovery. The battery provides extra protection for these logs. Contact F5 Support if the status is Missing, Degraded, or Failed; you may need a battery upgrade.
Drive appears only for the ACM. This shows the drive type (LSI, IDE, or SATA) and status for the internal disk(s). The possible status values are Good, Degraded, Error, or Unknown. If the status is Degraded or Error, replace the drive (for an ARX-1500, ARX-2000, ARX-2500, or ARX-4000) and/or contact F5 personnel (for an ARX-500). An Unknown status would likely be caused by an error in the drive-detection software.
Port Media Details only appears in the summary view (without any options) for the platforms that support 10G optics. These are the ARX-2500 and the ARX-4000. Each of these platforms supports up to two transceivers. Each row shows the following details about one of the transceivers:
Slot/Port, also identified on the front panel, identify the transceivers port,
Type, is the particular transceiver model,
Vendor shows the manufacturer of the transceiver, and
Status, which is Good, Bad, Present, Not Present, Absent, or Unknown.
The VM Information table only appears for the ARX-VE, which is a Virtual Appliance (VA, which is similar to a VM):
vMAC Address is the virtual MAC address assigned to the ARX-VE.
Adapter describes the network controller used by the ARX-VE.
Module is the heading for several tables with details of each module.
Slot is the modules slot number.
Ports is the number of ports on the module.
Procs is the number of processors.
Card is the card type: SCM_40, NSM, NSM_TX/FX, ASM/ASM_FC, or ACM. This does not appear on the ARX-VE.
Hardware only appears for the ARX-VE. This describes the CPU and memory resources reserved for the ARX-VE.
Xeon is the CPU speed for all Xeon processors (used in every module except the NSM) and memory that is allocated to each Xeon processor. This does not appear on the ARX-VE.
Sibyte is the CPU speed for all SiByte processors (used on the NSM and standalone ACMs) and the memory allocated to each SiByte complex. Each SiByte complex has two MIPS-processor cores. This does not appear for the ARX-VE, ARX-1500, or ARX-2500; none of these systems contain SiByte processors.
Serial is the modules serial number. This does not appear for the ARX-VE, ARX-1500, or ARX-2500; for those systems, refer to the overall chassis serial number in the show chassis chassinfo output.
The third table displays the revisions for the Complex Programmable Logic Devices (CPLDs) on the module, the Reset CPLD, the Keeper CPLD, the Power CPLD (ARX-4000 only), and the MUX CPLD (also ARX-4000 only):
ARX-4000 and ARX-2000 - the table contains the versions of the LBA FPGA and the NVR FPGA. The LBA (Load-Balancing Algorithm) FPGA merges inbound packets from the external interfaces to the NSM cores. The NVR FPGA manages the NVR, monitors chassis status through the MUX CPLD, and runs a watchdog process that reboots the chassis in the event of a serious failure.
Temperature Details shows temperature-sensor information from each module.
Slot is always 1.
Module is always ACM.
System Temp. shows the ambient chassis temperature in Celsius.
CPU Temp. shows the temperature of the CPU chip in Celsius.
CPU shows the current CPU speed. These chassis types automatically reduce the CPU speed if the temperature is too high. This field shows the current CPU speed followed by an indication of whether or not the speed has been reduced; (Normal) means that the CPU is running at 100%, a percentage (such as 85%) indicates that the CPU has been throttled back.
Fan Status shows the fan status and its speed setting. The fan status can be Online, Not Present, Fault (the fan tray failed), or Ctr Fail (the control to the fan-tray failed). The speed setting is in parentheses, and is high, medium, low, or Unk (unknown).
Metalog Usage shows the statistics for metalog usage on this chassis.
Status is the status of the metalog driver software, which writes metalog packets to an internal NFS export and duplicates them to a twin driver in the redundant peer (if there is one). The possible options are Standalone (there is no redundant peer), Active (the driver is duplicating all metalog packets to the redundant peer), and Standby (the driver is receiving all metalog packets from the Active peer).
Statistics is a table with metalog-usage statistics:
I/O Count is the number of metalog packets sent to local storage (and remote storage, if this is the Active chassis in a redundant pair).
Retransmit Count only increments on the Active peer in a redundant pair. This is the number of metalog transmissions to the Standby peer that required a retry.
Hourly Latency (usecs) is the average latency in micro-seconds between the ARX and its local metalog storage. This number is updated once per hour. On the Active peer, this is the longer of two events that occur in parallel: writing the data to the local partition and writing the same data to the Standby peers partition.
You can use show metalog usage to show all of the hourly metalog statistics since the last ARX reboot. The clear metalog usage command clears these statistics and restarts them at 0 (zero).
The NVR table shows the following information about the state of the hardware that protects Non-Volatile RAM:
NVR Battery is the battery status for Non-Volatile RAM (NVR or NVRAM). The possible values in this field are Good, Missing, Charging, Testing, Degraded, or Failed. The NVRAM stores transaction logs from the control plane, called metalog data, which are critical for failure recovery. The battery provides extra protection for these logs in the event of a power outage.
ECC State is the state of the Error-Correction Circuitry (ECC). The ECC checks all data as it is read from NVRAM, and generates errors if it detects any corruption. This can be No Error, Pending, Non-Correctable Error, or Unknown. A Non-Correctable Error state is serious; contact F5 personnel if you see this.
NVR Size (MB) is the size of the NVRAM region, in MegaBytes.
The ARX-VE has no NVRAM hardware, so this option generates no output when you run it on that platform. The nvr option does not even appear on the ARX-1500 and ARX-2500, which also do not support NVRAM hardware.
Figure 5.1 on page 5-26, Figure 5.2 on page 5-27, Figure 5.3 on page 5-30, Figure 5.4 on page 5-31, Figure 5.5 on page 5-31, and Figure 5.6 on page 5-33 show sample output for the show chassis command on the ARX-4000, ARX-2500, ARX-1500, ARX-VE, ARX-2000, and ARX-500 respectively.
bstnA> show chassis
stoweA> show chassis
canbyA> show chassis
stkbrgA# show chassis
prtlndA> show chassis
provA> show chassis
Use the show clock command to see the current time/date setting on the ARX.
Use the clock set command to reset the clock. Use the clock timezone command to reset the time zone. Use the ntp server command to synchronize the clock with an external NTP server.
stoweA# show clock
Use the show hostname command to see the ARXs hostname.
bstnA(cfg)# show hostname
The show memory usage command shows usage statistics for ARX memory.
report (optional) causes the CLI to create a report instead of showing output on the command line. The CLI shows the report name after you type the command. The report is named memory_usage_yyyymmddHHMMSS.rpt, where yyyymmddHHMMSS is the date and time when the report was created. Use show reports to list all reports and view the reports contents.
Date
MM/DD
is the month and day of the 3-hour sample.
Time Interval is the start time and end time for the 3-hour sample.
%Memory shows the low, average (Avg), and high percentages of memory used during the sample period.
Use the show processors usage command to show similar statistics for all processors on the switch; for other platform types, such as the ARX-2000, this also includes memory-usage statistics. The show system tasks command shows the currently-running tasks on one or more processors.
stoweA# show memory usage
canbyA# show memory usage report
stoweA# show memory usage
canbyA# show reports memory_usage_201103220344.rpt
Namespace software and network software each record important log information, called metalog data, to be shared with the ARX devices redundant peer. This metalog data facilitates a failover from the active ARX to its backup ARX. The ARX-1500 and ARX-2500 each store this data on internal disk partitions, one partition per volume group plus one partition per fastpath processor. The show metalog usage command shows usage statistics for these metalog-storage partitions.
report (optional) causes the CLI to create a report instead of showing output on the command line. The CLI shows the report name after you type the command. The report is named metalog_usage_yyyymmddHHMMSS.rpt, where yyyymmddHHMMSS is the date and time when the report was created. Use show reports to list all reports and view the reports contents.
Metalog Usage for Disk Partition id used by {Volume-Group n | Fastpath slot.proc}
Disk Partition id shows the ID of the internal-disk partition to store this metalog data.
Volume-Group n is the volume group that stores its metalog information on partition id. The show volume-group command lists all volume groups on the chassis.
Fastpath slot.proc indicates that the fastpath (or network) processor at slot.proc is using this internal partition to store its metalog data. The show processors command lists all processors on the chassis and shows which of them run the Fastpath (network) processes.
Date is the month and day of the sample.
Time Interval is the start time and end time for the sample.
I/O Count is the number of metalog packets sent to the local partition. If this ARX is in a redundant pair, this is the sum of the packets sent to the local partition and the duplicate packets sent to the partition on the backup peer. You can use the show redundancy command to check the redundancy status of this chassis.
Retransmit Count only increments on the active peer in a redundant pair. This is the number of metalog transmissions to the backup peer that required a retry.
Latency (usecs) is the minimum, maximum, and average latency in micro-seconds between the ARX and its local metalog partition. These numbers are updated once per hour. On the active peer in a redundant pair, this is the longer of two events that occur in parallel: writing the data to the local partition and writing the same data to the backup peers partition.
The show redundancy metalog command shows similar statistics, but it applies to all platforms (except the ARX-VE). To find similar statistics on the ARX-VE platform, use the probe metalog latency command.
On all platforms, the namespace software keeps metalog read/write statistics. You can use the show statistics metalog command to see these metalog-usage statistics from a namespace-software perspective.
stoweA# show metalog usage
canbyA# show metalog usage report
stoweA# show metalog usage
canbyA# show reports metalog_usage_201104110152.rpt
Use the show processors command to list the processors (CPUs) installed on the ARX.
Proc is in processor.core format. The processor is always 1, and the core number identifies the particular core.
Role is either Fastpath (network processing), Volume-Group (storage-related processing), or System (CLI, GUI, and other management processing). This indicates the type of process that primarily runs on this core.
CPU1M is the average CPU usage over the last 60 seconds. This number is a percentage.
CPU5M is the average CPU usage over the last 5 minutes. As above, this is a percentage.
Up Time is time since the last reboot. You can use the reload command to manually reboot. For the ARX-VE, you can also reboot from your VM-client console.
Memory (MB) is a heading for the following processor-memory measures, in MegaBytes:
Total is the processors total memory.
Free is the processors available memory.
Swap (MB) is a heading for similar swap-space measures, also in MegaBytes. This is space on the internal hard disk that is used as a memory region when free memory is low:
Total is the processors total swap space.
Free is the processors available swap space.
Proc shows the slot location of the processor in slot.processor format. Processor 1.1 is the management processor for all platforms.
Module is the processors module type (ACM only on the ARX-500 or ARX-2000; ACM or NSM on the ARX-4000).
State is the current processor state:
Reset - should appear very briefly, just before Boot.
Boot - the processor is running its diagnostic tests, invoked during boot.
Init - the processor passed its diagnostic tests and is being provisioned.
Waiting - the processor is waiting for configuration parameters before it can begin processing. If all NSM and/or ACM processors are in the Waiting state, they require proper configuration for the interfaces. Minimally, each interface must be started with no shutdown (cfg-if-gig), and each NSM processor requires a proxy-IP address (see ip proxy-address).
Downloading - if (during Init) the processor discovers that it needs new software, it enters this state to fetch and install the software.
Unknown - the CLI cannot ascertain the processors state.
Standby - appears for an NSM processor that failed over to a peer processor and then came back online. The peer processor is now handling this processors traffic, and this processor is in a hot-standby state. If the peer processor fails, this processor takes control. The nsm recovery command configures the NSM processors to go into this state if they experience a failure. NSM processors also go into this state after a full-chassis failover (you prepare an ARX for failovers with the redundancy command).
FW Upgrade - indicates that the module is upgrading its firmware. You can start a firmware upgrade after installing a software release with new firmware; see the documentation for the firmware upgrade command.
FW Upgrade Failed - means that the module failed an attempted firmware upgrade. Call F5 Support if you see this state.
Up Time is time since the last reboot. Use the reload command to reboot.
Memory (MB) is a heading for the following processor-memory measures, in MegaBytes:
Total is the processors total memory.
Free is the processors available memory.
CPU1M is the current CPU usage in a 1-minute period.
CPU5M is the current CPU usage in a 5-minute period.
Use the show system tasks command to view the tasks that are currently running on one or more processors. For statistics on CPU and memory usage over time, use the show processors usage command.
stoweA> show processors
stkbrgA# show processors
bstnA# show processors
prtlndA# show processors
stoweA> show processors
stkbrgA# show processors
bstnA# show processors
prtlndA# show processors
The show processors usage command shows usage statistics for the processors (CPUs) installed on the ARX.
show processors usage {slot.processor | all} [report]
slot.processor (optional) specifies one processor.
slot is the slot number.
processor is the processor number. Use the show processors command to show all processors and their associated slot.processor IDs.
all (optional) specifies all processors.
report (optional) is only an option if you select one processor or use the all keyword. This causes the CLI to create a report instead of showing output on the command line. The CLI shows the report name after you type the command. The report is named processor_usage_yyyymmddHHMMSS.rpt, where yyyymmddHHMMSS is the date and time when the report was created. Use show reports to list all reports and view the reports contents.
Processor Usage for slot.proc appears for each processor on most platforms,
Processor Usage for slot.proc role appears instead on the ARX-1500 and ARX-2500. The role describes the types of processes that used the CPU cycles in the table:
FastPath is for network-related processes, similar to those that run on the NSM in other platforms. These are also called data plane processes.
Volume-Group is for storage-related processes, such as managed-volume processes and the policy engine.
System is for the CLI and GUI (or manager) processes, and other processes related to system administration.
Date is the month and day of the 3-hour sample.
Time Interval is the start time and end time for the 3-hour sample.
%CPU shows the low, average (Avg), and high percentages of CPU cycles used during the sample period.
%Memory shows the same measures for memory. This does not appear in the output for the ARX-1500 or ARX-2500; you can use show memory usage to get these measures on either of those platforms.
%Swap shows the percentages for swap-space usage. An ACM only uses swap space when a large portion of standard memory is used up. On the ARX-1500 and ARX-2500, this command omits the %Swap table.
Use the show processors command to show the current state of all processors on the switch. The show system tasks command shows the currently-running tasks on one or more processors.
bstnA# show processors usage
canbyA# show processors usage
bstnA# show processors usage 1.1 report
bstnA# show processors usage
canbyA# show processors usage
bstnA# show reports processor_usage_201104010144.rpt
Use the show uptime command to see how long the system has been up since the last reboot.
bstnA> show uptime
Use the show version command to display the installed-software versions and a summary of the chassis configuration and state.
Running Release is the software version that is currently running. This appears in the following format:
release-file : Version version-num (build-date) username
where release-file is in the local releases directory, which you can see with the show releases command.
Armed Release is the software to be loaded on the next reboot, if any. This appears in the same format as the Running Release. Use boot system to arm the switch with a new release file. Use reload to reboot and put the new release file into service.
Backup Release is the software release that was running prior to the current release, if any. F5 personnel can roll the switch back to this release if needed.
System Configuration is a table of module information for the hardware platforms, one row per module.
Slot is only 1 for all chassis except the ARX-4000, which has a second slot devoted to data-plane processes.
Admin is enabled.
ModuleType is ACM (which runs management processes, control-plane processes, and possibly data-plane processes) or NSM (which exclusively runs data-plane processes).
ModuleState values appear in Guidelines: Module States, below.
FW Upgrade is enabled or disabled. If enabled, a chassis-software upgrade automatically upgrades the modules firmware. To enable this feature, contact F5 personnel. To install firmware manually, after a software upgrade, use the firmware upgrade command.
For the ARX-VE, ARX-1500, and ARX-2500, the System Configuration table contains a single row showing how long it has been since the last reboot.
The Resource table only appears for the ARX-500, ARX-2000, or ARX-4000 platforms. This table shows the high-level state of the switch, and whether it supports packet forwarding (like a MAC bridge) or not (like an end station).
State is Up or an error message. If there is an error, use show chassis for details.
Forwarding is Enabled (meaning the ARX can forward packets from one client/server port to another, performing the functions of a MAC bridge) or Disabled. You can set this with the switch-forwarding enable command.
The ModuleState field can contain any of the following values:
Removed - the slot previously had a module, but it has been removed.
Discovery - the chassis is finding all module states, very early in the boot process.
Boot - the module is running its diagnostic tests, invoked during boot.
Init - the module passed its diagnostic tests and is provisioning its internal processors.
Downloading - if (during Init) the module discovers that it needs new software, it enters this state to fetch and install the software.
Online Partial - at least one processor is up, but not all of them are online yet. If a processor does not come up after 5 minutes, this changes to Failed Partial state.
Failed Partial - at least one processor is up, but at least one processor failed.
Offline - applies to the network processors. This indicates that the ACM has not provided the network processors with important configuration parameters, so the processors cannot come online. Any of the following issues can result in this state on an ARX-500, ARX-2000, or ARX-4000:
The NVRAM battery failed on the ACM. Use show chassis nvr to confirm this; if the issue persists, contact F5 Support.
Poweroff - the slot has no power.
FW Upgrade - the module is installing new firmware from the installed software release. The firmware upgrade command starts a firmware installation.
FW Upgrade Failed - a firmware upgrade failed on this module.
bstnA> show version
stoweA> show version
canbyA> show version
prtlndA> show version
provA> show version
stkbrgA# show version
Use the shutdown command to halt the ARX, perhaps from a remote location. This gracefully stops all power on the system.
The CLI warns you that you must manually restore power to the chassis; enter yes to proceed with the power-off sequence. You can restore power on site by flipping the power switch or pushing the power button. Refer to the Hardware Installation Guide for your chassis to find the location of the power button or switch. The ARX-VE is a software-only platform that runs as a Virtual Appliance (VA, similar to a VM); use your VM client to restart the ARX-VE.
You can use the reload command to reboot the ARX. To clear the NVRAM (in case of an unrecoverable corruption), use clear nvr.
provB# shutdown
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