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Manual Chapter: Restore Data
Manual Chapter
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32 
A restore data operation restores files from an external filer to a managed volume; the cancel restore data command stops a restore operation.
cancel restore data namespace volume volume path path
namespace (1-30 characters) is the namespace to which files are being restored. Use the show restore data command for a list of namespaces where restores are running.
volume (1-1024 characters) specifies the namespace volume where the restore is occurring.
path (1-1024 characters) specifies the volume directory. This path is relative to the volume root, above. Use forward slashes (/) for NFS or CIFS paths.
Use the restore data command to start restoring files and directories to a volume. Restore operations happen in the background while you continue to use the CLI; you can use the wait-for restore data command to block the CLI until the restore is complete. To show all restore operations, use show restore data.
bstnA# cancel restore data wwmed volume /acct path /
The ARX holds its restore-operation records indefinitely, so that you can see the results of every restore operation through show restore data. Use the clear restore data command to remove restore operations from this running history.
clear restore data namespace volume vol-path
clear restore data namespace volume vol-path path path
The namespace, vol-path, and path arguments mimic the ones used in the restore data command. These identify one or more restore operations; if you omit all of them, the command clears all restore-operation records from the switch.
namespace (1-30 characters) specifies a namespace where one or more restores have occurred.
vol-path (optional, 1-1024 characters) specifies a volume. Use forward slashes (/) for all volumes, including CIFS.
path (optional, 1-1024 characters) identifies a particular path that has been restored. As with volumes, use forward slashes in all paths.
Use show restore data to show all recorded restore operations. This command clears them; after you run it, the show restore data command no longer displays the cleared operation(s).
The restore data command starts a restore operation (which runs in the background while you continue to use the CLI), cancel restore data cancels a running restore, and wait-for restore data blocks the CLI until a running restore completes.
bstnA# clear restore data wwmed
bstnA# clear restore data
clears all restore records from the switch. The show restore data command displays nothing after you do this.
restore data namespace volume volume path dest-path
filer ext-filer {nfs nfs-export | cifs cifs-share}+ source-path src-path [recurse] [remove-source]
namespace, volume volume, and path dest-path specify the destination for the restored files:
namespace (1-30 characters) specifies the destination namespace for the restore operation. Use the show namespace command for a list of configured namespaces.
volume (1-1024 characters) is the volume to be restored. All of the namespaces volumes appear in the show namespace output.
dest-path (1-1024 characters) is the file or directory to be restored (for example, var/log). This path is relative to the volume root, above. If this is a directory, the restored files are placed into a new subdirectory under this path named restore. Use forward slashes (/) for NFS or CIFS paths.
filer ext-filer, {nfs ... | cifs ...}+, and source-path src-path define the source share for the restore operation:
ext-filer (1-64 characters) is the external filer where the backed-up files reside. This must be defined on the ARX as an external filer. Use the show external-filer command for a list of configured external filers.
{nfs nfs-export | cifs cifs-share}+ is a required choice. For multi-protocol (NFS and CIFS) filers, you must specify both.
nfs-export (1-1024 characters) is an NFS-export path.
cifs-share (also 1-1024 characters) is a CIFS-share name.
src-path (1-1024 characters) chooses the file or directory on the source share (for example, /backups/vol3). This path is relative to the nfs-export and/or cifs-share root, above. Use forward slashes (/) for NFS or CIFS paths.
recurse causes the restore operation to descend into subdirectories.
remove-source removes all of the selected files and directories from the source share after a successful restore. If there is any failure, the restore operation leaves the source share intact.
recurse is off; the restore only restores from the top of the src-dir-path to the top of the dir-path without descending into any child directories.
remove-source is off; the source share is unaffected by the restore operation.
For sites where migrations are frequent, or where backups are infrequent, you may need file tracking to find a file location on a particular backup date. The file-tracking process involves regular snapshots of the managed volumes configuration and metadata, which are stored on a file-history archive. Once this archive process is running, you can use the show virtual path-history command to query the archive for service names at the time of an earlier backup. This also shows the namespace, volumes, and filers that mapped to the service names at the time. Armed with this historical information, you can use show file-history virtual-service to query the archive for the file location at a given time.
Recover the file from the backup server and place it onto a staging area on a filer (typically, the same filer where the file was originally backed up). A staging area is a directory that is not imported into any managed volume.
The restore data command restores the files and directories from the staging-area directory to their managed volume, which in turn sends the files/directories to the filer(s) specified by your storage policies.
Each restore operation has a unique job ID and generates a report of its progress. The reports follow this naming convention: restore.job-id.volume.rpt. Use show reports to list all reports, including restore reports. To follow the progress of the restore operation, you can use tail reports report-name follow. A sample of this report appears in Figure 32.1 on page 32-8.
To view all restore operations (past and present), use show restore data. You can use the cancel restore data command to cancel a restore operation that is currently underway. To remove old records of restore operations, you can use the clear restore data command. Restore operations occur in the background so that you can continue to issue CLI commands; to pause the CLI until the restore operation to finishes, use wait-for restore data.
From any remote host that runs the Secure SHell (SSH) program, you can run the restore data command and show the output of the report. Use the following syntax with ssh at the remote machine:
ssh admin-user@mip restore-data...
admin-user is a valid user (use show users to list all of them),
mip is a management-IP address for this ARX (use show interface mgmt and/or show interface vlan to list them), and
restore-data... is the restore data command, surrounded by quotation marks ().
bstnA# restore data wwmed volume /acct path / filer das1 nfs /exports/backups source-path /acct recurse
bstnA# restore data insur volume /claims path /stats filer nasE1 nfs /root_vdm_4/backups cifs BACKUPS source-path /stats recurse
bstnA# show reports restore.7._claims.rpt
Use the show restore data command to show the results of all restore operations.
show restore data namespace volume vol-path
show restore data namespace volume vol-path path path
namespace (optional, 1-30 characters) is the name of a namespace. Use show namespace for a list of all configured namespaces. If you omit this (and all other options), the output includes all recorded restore operations on all namespaces.
vol-path (optional, 1-1024 characters) focuses on a particular volume. Use forward slashes (/) for all volumes, including CIFS.
path (optional, 1-1024 characters) narrows the focus further, to a particular path within the volume. As with volumes, use forward slashes in all paths.
Namespace is a namespace where at least one restore operation occurred.
Volume is one volume that was restored.
Path is the specific path that was restored. This contains details about the operation:
Options are recurse and/or remove-source. This does not appear unless the user selected one of these options. They are options in the restore data command.
Source Filer is the name and IP address of the external filer used as a source. This is also specified in the restore data command.
NFS Source identifies the NFS export used as a source share. This only appears if NFS was used in the restore operation.
CIFS Source identifies the CIFS share used as a source. This only appears if CIFS was used in the restore operation.
Status is Pending, Restoring, Pending Cancel, Canceling, Success, or Failed. A typical restore operation goes from Pending to Restoring to Success. Use the cancel restore data command to cancel the restore operation. For details on the restore operations progress, you can look at the restore report, identified below.
Report Name is the name of a detailed report about the restore operation (and the ARX where the report is stored). You can use the show reports command to view the report.
Error only appears if the restore failed. This summarizes the problem.
Items Found are the files and/or directories that were found on the Source Filer share.
Items Transferred are the files and/or directories that were successfully restored to the target volume.
Failures is the number of files and/or directories that were not restored.
Total Bytes Restored is the number of bytes in the successfully-transferred files and directories.
Completed at shows the date and time when the restore operation finished.
This output grows with every run of the restore data command. Use clear restore data to clear all restore operations from this output (without deleting any of the detailed restore reports; use delete to remove those).
bstnA# show restore data
bstnA# show restore data insur volume /claims
bstnA# show restore data
bstnA# show restore data insur volume /claims
Use the wait-for restore data command to block the CLI until one or more restore operations completes.
wait-for restore data namespace [timeout timeout]
wait-for restore data namespace volume vol-path [timeout timeout]
wait-for restore data namespace volume vol-path path path [timeout timeout]
The namespace, vol-path, and path arguments mimic the ones used in the restore data command. These identify one or more restore operations; if you omit all of them, the command waits for all restore operations on the switch.
namespace (1-30 characters) specifies a namespace where one or more restore operations are occurring.
vol-path (optional, 1-1024 characters) specifies a volume. Use forward slashes (/) for all volumes, including CIFS.
path (optional, 1-1024 characters) identifies a particular path that is being restored. As with volumes, use forward slashes in all paths.
timeout (optional, 1-2096) is the timeout value, specified in seconds. If this timer expires before the restore operation completes, the command exits with a warning.
timeout - 0 (zero, meaning wait indefinitely)
The wait-for restore data command waits for a specified restore operation to complete.
To interrupt the wait-for restore data command, press <Ctrl-C>. Use cancel restore data to cancel the restore operation altogether.
bstnA# wait-for restore data timeout 60
bstnA> wait-for restore data insur timeout 120
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