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Manual Chapter: Tracking Files on Your Back-End Storage
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File tracking is the process of periodically archiving the back-end locations of your files so that you can learn where any file was stored on any given day. Some sites back up and restore their files directly from their back-end filers, behind the ARX and its managed volumes. These sites use a data-protection device, called a backup server in this manual, to coordinate NDMP backups and restores between filers and backup tapes. If a managed volume migrates files since the most-recent backup operation, you may not know the filer where the files were backed up. You can use file tracking to keep records of files as they migrate, and to identify the filer that held any given file at any given time.
To support ARX snapshots, each NetApp volume must have the nosnapdir option turned off. From the NetApp CLI, use the vol options command on each NetApp volume behind the ARX:
vol options vol-name nosnapdir off
where vol-name identifies the NetApp volume.
juser@mgmt17:~$ ssh root@192.168.25.21
nas1*> vol options vol1 nosnapdir off
Two or more ARX-snapshot rules with the same schedule perform snapshot grouping, described in Snapshot Grouping. That is, the ARX determines the fewest-possible back-end snapshots that it can take to satisfy all of the concurrent rules. This improves snapshot performance. However, any single back-end snapshot may end up in a larger group, and may have to wait for the EMC serialization described in this section.
To invoke snapshots at the volumes metadata filer, the ARX volume requires administrative privileges at the filers CLI. You enter the proper administrative username and password as a proxy user. If the metadata share is hosted by a NetApp or EMC device, these are UNIX credentials for RSH or SSH logins; they do not require a Windows domain. If the metadata share is hosted by a Windows Server, the volume uses WinRM to access it: in this case, the proxy user must have an FQDN to facilitate Kerberos authentication.
bstnA(gbl)# proxy-user nas_admin
Password: rootpasswd
For details on these proxy-user commands and others, see Adding a Proxy User, on page 3-4 of the ARX® CLI Storage-Management Guide.
bstnA(gbl)# external-filer nas1
bstnA(gbl-filer[nas1])# filer-type network-appliance
bstnA(gbl-filer[nas1])# proxy-user nas_admin
bstnA(gbl-filer[nas1])# manage snapshots
For external filers where the ARX tracks files, use the filer-type command and the proxy-user command. It is unnecessary to use the manage snapshots command to support this path-retrieval process:
bstnA(gbl)# external-filer fs2
bstnA(gbl-filer[fs2])# filer-type windows
bstnA(gbl-filer[fs2])# proxy-user cifs_admin
For NFS shares, each path includes the back-end-export path used in the gbl-ns-shr filer command. This may be a virtual path on the filer, not an actual part of the physical file system, so you may need to translate it to use it with your backup server. For information on the filer command, see Identifying the Filer and Share, on page 9-34 of the ARX® CLI Storage-Management Guide.
From gbl mode, use the file-history archive command to start the process of configuring one:
where name (1-64 characters) is a name you choose for the archive configuration.
The CLI prompts for confirmation before creating a new archive object; enter yes to continue. This puts you into gbl-archive mode, where you choose a filer or managed volume to hold the archive records.
bstnA(gbl)# file-history archive fileRecordsMed
From gbl-archive mode, use the location filer command to choose an external filer where the archive will reside. The following syntax selects an NFS export to store the archive:
location filer ext-filer {nfs3tcp | nfs3} share-name [path path]
ext-filer (1-64 characters) identifies the filer where the archive will reside. This is the external-filer name for the filer; use show external-filer for a complete list of configured filers on the ARX.
nfs3tcp | nfs3 are a required choice. The nfs3tcp option is NFSv3 over TCP, and the nfs3 option is NFSv3 over UDP.
share-name (1-64 characters) is the name of the back-end NFS export where the archive will reside.
path path (optional, 1-1024 characters) chooses a subdirectory to store the archive.
location filer ext-filer cifs share-name proxy-user proxy [path path]
ext-filer (1-64 characters) identifies a CIFS-supporting filer.
cifs is a required keyword.
share-name (1-64 characters) is the name of the back-end CIFS share where the archive will reside.
proxy (1-32 characters) is the name of a proxy-user configuration (see Adding a Proxy User, on page 3-4 of the ARX® CLI Storage-Management Guide). The CLI uses the proxy-user credentials to store archive files on the share-name share. These credentials require read and write permission at the share; they do not require Backup Operator or Administrator privileges. Use show proxy-user for a full list of all proxy users.
path path (optional, 1-1024 characters) chooses a subdirectory to store the archive.
bstnA(gbl)# file-history archive fileRecordsMed
bstnA(gbl-archive[fileRecordsMed])# location filer fs4 cifs arx_file_archv proxy-user acoProxy2
Use the location namespace command to store the archive on one of the ARXs volumes. The file-access protocol(s) and the proxy user are part of the namespace configuration, so they are not required in this form of the command:
location namespace name volume vol-path [path path]
name (1-30 characters) is a namespace on the current ARX. Use show namespace for a list of all available namespaces. If you choose a multi-protocol (NFS and CIFS) namespace, the archive uses NFS to store its records.
vol-path (1-1024 characters) selects a volume from the above namespace. Type a ? character for a list of the namespaces volumes.
path path (optional, 1-1024 characters) chooses a subdirectory to store the archive.
bstnA(gbl)# file-history archive testFA
bstnA(gbl-archive[testFA])# location namespace wwmed volume /acct path /fileArchs
/ARX-name-ARX-GUID
/yyyy
/mm
/dd
/namespace-name
/volume-name
/namespace-name
/volume-name
/dd
/mm
/yyyy
This structure starts at the path given by the location command, described above. If there is no path, this starts in the root of the ARX volume or filer share.
bstnA(gbl)# file-history archive FHinsur
bstnA(gbl)# file-history archive FHinsur
bstnA(gbl-archive[FHinsur])# location namespace medarcv volume /fhStore
where text is 1-255 characters. Quote the text if it contains any spaces.
bstnA(gbl)# file-history archive fileRecordsMed
bstnA(gbl-archive[fileRecordsMed])# description archive share for ARX file histories
From gbl-archive mode, use no description to remove the description string from the current file-history archive:
bstnA(gbl)# file-history archive testFA
Use the show file-history archive command to display a list of all the archives on the current ARX. You can enter this command from any CLI mode:
bstnA(gbl)# show file-history archive
where name (1-64 characters) identifies the desired archive.
bstnA(gbl)# show file-history archive fileRecordsMed
Use the show global-config archive command to show the full configuration for all archives on the ARX:
bstnA(gbl)# show global-config archive
where name (1-64 characters) identifies the archive to display.
If no volumes currently use this archive, you can remove it from the ARX. From gbl mode, use the no file-history archive command to remove an archive from the ARX configuration:
where name (1-64 characters) identifies the archive to remove.
bstnA(gbl)# no file-history archive testFA
bstnA(gbl)# namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/rcrds])# snapshot rule rcrdsArchive
From gbl-ns-vol-snap mode, use the archive command to select a file-history archive for the current snapshot rule:
where name (1-64 characters) selects an existing archive.
bstnA(gbl)# namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/rcrds])# snapshot rule rcrdsArchive
You can disconnect the current snapshot rule from its file-history archive with the no archive command. This prevents future snapshots from tracking any file history. This is the default for a typical snapshot rule, one configured only for client-data snapshots.
bstnA(gbl)# namespace medarcv volume /lab_equipment
From gbl-ns-vol-snap mode, use the contents command to determine the contents of this rules snapshots:
user-data selects client-viewable files and directories. This is the default for a snapshot rule.
volume-config selects the current configuration of the volume. This stores the mappings of front-end shares to back-end paths.
metadata (optional) chooses the volumes metadata, too. The metadata contains the locations of all client files and directories in the volume.
bstnA(gbl)# namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/rcrds])# snapshot rule rcrdsArchive
You can use no contents to remove either user data or the volume configuration from this rules snapshots:
user-data removes client-viewable files and directories from the rules snapshots.
volume-config removes the volume configuration and metadata from future snapshots.
bstnA(gbl)# namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/rcrds])# snapshot rule rcrdsArchive
To create a schedule, use the gbl schedule command (refer to Appendix 12, Creating a Policy Schedule in the ARX® CLI Storage-Management Guide for details). To apply a schedule to the snapshot rule, use the schedule command in gbl-ns-vol-snap mode.
bstnA(gbl)# namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/rcrds])# snapshot rule rcrdsArchive
report prefix [error-only]
where error-only (optional) causes the snapshot rule to generate reports if there is an error in the snapshot operation. This is not recommended for snapshots with client data, as it makes snapshot reconstitution impossible for client shares. This option is acceptable for snapshots that are limited to volume configuration and/or metadata, because those snapshots are archived and do not require reconstitution.
Use the show reports command for a list of all reports, or show reports type Snapshot for a list of snapshot reports. Use show reports report-name to read the report, show reports status report-name to get a one-line summary of the report, grep to search through the full report, or tail reports report-name follow to follow a report as it is being written.
bstnA(gbl)# namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/rcrds])# snapshot rule rcrdsArchive
The final step in configuring any snapshot rule is to enable it. By default, the rule is disabled and ignored by policy software. You must enable the rule to run snapshots on a schedule or to invoke the snapshots manually. As described in Enabling the Snapshot Rule, you use the enable command to enable the rule. For example, the following command sequence enables the rcrdsArchive rule:
bstnA(gbl)# namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/rcrds])# snapshot rule rcrdsArchive
When the snapshot rule takes a snapshot of the volumes metadata, the volumes clients are unable to modify the metadata until the snapshot is complete. This raises a VIP fence, which is discussed in Enabling Snapshot Consistency. Every VIP that exports this volume puts up a VIP fence, thus blocking client access to any other volumes behind the same VIP or VIPs.
From priv-exec mode, you can use the cancel snapshot archive command to cancel an archiving process that is currently underway:
cancel snapshot archive namespace ns volume vol-path rule rule-name
ns (1-30 characters) selects the namespace,
vol-path (1-1024 characters) is the managed volume, and
rule-name (1-1024 characters) identifies the snapshot rule that is currently running the archive operation.
bstnA# cancel snapshot archive namespace medarcv volume /rcrds rule rcrdsArchive
You can use the snapshot remove command to delete all of the back-end snapshots behind a snapshot rule. If this snapshot rule includes user data as well as metadata, this also removes any metadata snapshots on the volumes metadata filer. This command only removes filer snapshots, not the rule configuration.
You can skip this section if the snapshot rule only includes volume configuration and/or metadata (recall Selecting the Contents of the Snapshot). If the snapshot rule does not include any user data, the rule deletes the metadata snapshot as soon as it is successfully copied to the archive. This prevents the metadata filer from accumulating unnecessary snapshots.
From priv-exec mode, use the snapshot remove command to remove the filer snapshots and/or checkpoints behind a snapshot rule and the volumes metadata share. Removing all Snapshots Behind a Rule, describes this command in detail.
bstnA# snapshot remove medarcv /lab_equipment dailyArchive
From gbl-ns-vol mode, use the no snapshot rule command to remove a snapshot rule from the current volume. For details on this command, see Removing a Snapshot Rule.
bstnA(gbl)# namespace medarcv volume /lab_equipment
For situations where you are unsure of the earlier configuration, you can use the show virtual path-history command from any mode. This command only functions after one or more snapshots have archived the volumes configuration:
show virtual path-history time-frame [report rpt-prefix] [archive arch-name] [verbose]
time-frame establishes the date(s) for your query. This takes several forms, discussed in the subsections below.
report rpt-prefix (optional, 1-255 characters) sends the output to a report. Without this option, the output appears at the CLI prompt. The report name is in rpt-prefix_archive-name_date-time.rpt format; the exact name appears after you enter the command. You can use show reports to list all reports, and show reports report-name to view any report.
archive arch-name (optional, 1-64 characters) specifies a particular file-history archive.
verbose (optional) expands the output with further details.
show virtual path-history date {today | date} [report rpt-prefix] [archive arch-name] [verbose]
today | date indicates that you want the configuration from a single day. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
The output contains a block of information for each archived snapshot in the given time-frame. Each block has a heading, As of date time, and contains configuration information followed by two tables. The configuration information identifies the file-history archive, the ARX, the global server that clients accessed to reach their files, and the particular namespace and volume containing the files. The first table contains one row per volume share, with the ARX-share name in one column and the shares back-end location in the other column. The second table has one row per front-end export, and maps the name of the client-visible export to its root directory in the ARX volume.
For example, the following command shows the full path history for a single day, 9/14/2009. This shows an archived snapshot for the medarcv~/lab_equipment volume, followed by another archived snapshot for the medarcv~/rcrds volume. From the Export tables in this output, we find that the ac1.medarch.org has a share named labs along with two other shares, and that it has several additional shares (ARCHIVES, Y2005, and more) backed by the /rcrds volume. These data points will be useful later, and are shown in bold below:
bstnA(gbl-ns-vol[medarcv~/lab_equipment])# show virtual path-history date 09/14/2009
Global Server: ac1.medarch.org
labs \
ARCHIVES \
You can set a start date and/or an end date for the path historys time frame. To set a range of dates in this way, use the start-date clause, the end-date clause, or both. These go in place of the date clause shown above.
show virtual path-history start-date date [report rpt-prefix] [archive arch-name] [verbose]
where date is some day in the past. Use mm/dd/yyyy format. The end date is today, implicitly.
where today | date is the last day in the query. Implicitly, the start date is the date of the first snapshot in the archive. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
show virtual path-history start-date date end-date date [report rpt-prefix] ...
bstnA(gbl)# show virtual path-history start-date 01/07/2009 report pathsSinceJan verbose
bstnA(gbl)# show virtual path-history end-date 06/05/2009 archive fileRecordsMed
You can also count back from an end date with the show virtual path-history command. To accomplish this, you specify some number of days, weeks, months, and so on that lead up to the end date:
show virtual path-history count {days|weeks|months|quarters|years} before {today | date} ...
count (1-100) is the number of days, weeks, or whatever you choose with the next argument.
days|weeks|...|years indicates the time unit.
today | date is the last day in the query. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
bstnA(gbl)# show virtual path-history 1 year before today archive fileRecordsMed
From priv-exec mode, use the show file-history virtual-service command to view the location of a particular file on a particular day. This is the general syntax of the command:
show file-history virtual-service server-and-share time-frame file-path [options]
server-and-share specifies the server name and the share name as seen by ARX clients during the time-frame. Server and share names may change over time, so you can use the show virtual path-history command to find the correct names for that date, as described above.
time-frame is a time period when the snapshot rule archived the volumes configuration and metadata at least once.
file-path is the file or directory to seek.
options (all optional) include search parameters, such as recursion into subdirectories.
show file-history virtual-service fqdn fe-share date {today | date} {[file filename] [path path]}
fqdn (1-1024 characters) identifies the front-end service that clients use to access the file. As mentioned above, you can use show virtual path-history to find a service name that is appropriate to your date. This can also be the VIP, WINS name, or WINS alias from the time (all included in the output of show virtual path-history).
fe-share (1-1024 characters) is the front-end share that clients use (or used) to access the file. This is case-sensitive for NFS shares (that is, thisShare is different than THISshare), but not for CIFS shares.
date {today | date} is the specific date for which you want the files location. To specify a date other than today, use mm/dd/yyyy format. A query for today applies to the time of day when the file-history record was archived; for a file location as of this minute, use the find command or run a nsck ... report metadata-only report. Both of these commands are described in later chapters.
[file filename] [path path] chooses the file or directory to seek. This is required: you must select the file, the path (a directory), or both.
filename (1-255 characters) is the file itself. This is not case sensitive: for example, an entry of myfile.txt would match an actual filename of myFile.txt or MYFILE.TXT. You can also use wildcard characters and sequences supported by the wildmat standard: * means 0 or more characters, ? means any single character, [0-9] means any single digit, [^a-z] means any single character except a lowercase letter, and so on. This searches the root directory of the fe-share, or the path that you specify in the next argument.
path is a directory path, relative to the root of the fe-share. You use forward slashes (/) in an NFS share or a CIFS share: for example, myDir/yourDir is a valid path in any share. This also supports wildmat expressions.
bstnA# show file-history virtual-service ac1.medarch.org ARCHIVES 09/14/2009 today file a_adams.dat path /2005/planA
You have several options at the end of the show file-history command to control the search parameters and the output. You can use any of these options at the end of any show file-history virtual-service command:
recurse (optional) extends the search into subdirectories.
case-sensitive (optional) limits the search to the exact filename or path that you typed. This means that an entry of INDEX.html does not match the index.html file. By default, INDEX.html would match index.html, Index.html, or any other case combination.
verbose (optional) expands the output with further details. If you specify a path with this option, the output is a list of the files in all matching directories.
report rpt-prefix (optional, 1-255 characters) sends the output to a report. Without this option, the output appears at the CLI prompt. The report name is in rpt-prefix_archive-name_date-time.rpt format; the exact name appears after you enter the command. You can use show reports to list all reports, and show reports report-name to view any report.
archive arch-name (optional, 1-64 characters) specifies a particular file-history archive.
bstnA# show file-history virtual-service ac1.medarch.org labs date today file index.html recurse verbose report indexPaths
You can set a start date and/or an end date for the files time frame. To set a range of dates in this way, use the start-date clause, the end-date clause, or both. These go in place of the date clause shown above.
show file-history virtual-service fqdn fe-share start-date date {[file filename] [path path]} ...
where date is some day in the past. The end date is today, implicitly. Use mm/dd/yyyy format.
show file-history virtual-service fqdn fe-share end-date {today | date} ...
where today | date is the last day in the query. Implicitly, the start date is the date of the first snapshot in the archive. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
show file-history virtual-service fqdn fe-share start-date date end-date {today | date} ...
bstnA# show file-history virtual-service ac1.medarch.org labs start-date 11/12/2008 file index.html recurse
You can also count back from an end date with the show file-history virtual-service command. To accomplish this, you specify some number of days, weeks, months, and so on that lead up to the end date:
show file-history virtual-service fqdn fe-share count {days|weeks|months|quarters|years} before {today | date} ...
count (1-100) is the number of days, weeks, or whatever you choose with the next argument.
days|weeks|...|years indicates the time unit.
today | date is the last day in the query. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
bstnA# show file-history virtual-service ac1.medarch.org labs 3 days before today file reagentlist.pdf recurse
From any mode, use the find command to find a files current back-end location:
find host hostname-or-vip {cifs | nfs} share-name path path
hostname-or-vip (1-255 characters) is the DNS hostname or VIP that clients use to access the file (syntax for a WINS name appears later), To use a hostname defined at an external DNS server, you must first identify the server with the ip name-server command. For instructions on using this command, see Configuring DNS Lookups, on page 4-31 of the ARX® CLI Network-Management Guide.
{cifs | nfs} share-name (1-4096 characters) is the share that clients use, and
path (1-4096 characters) specifies the client-visible path to the file. Use forward slashes (/), even for paths in CIFS shares.
bstnA(gbl)# find global-server ac1.medarch.org cifs ARCHIVES path /2005/planA/a_adams.dat
bstnA(gbl)# find host 192.168.25.15 cifs STATS path /carrierCrossCheck.html
You can also show the NFS filehandles, both from the client perspective and the server perspective. Use the optional verbose keyword at the end of the command to add the filehandles to the output:
find host hostname-or-vip {cifs | nfs} share-name path path verbose
where verbose (optional) adds the NFS filehandles to the output. The other options were explained above.
bstnA(gbl)# find host 192.168.25.15 nfs /claims path /stats/carrierCrossCheck.html verbose
find global-server fqdn {cifs | nfs} share-name path path [verbose]
fqdn (1-255 characters) identifies the global server that clients use to access the file (for example, myServer.com),
{cifs | nfs} share-name (1-4096 characters) is the share that clients use, and
path (1-4096 characters) specifies the client-visible path to the file. As above, use forward slashes (/) for all paths.
verbose (optional) adds the files NFS filehandles to the output.
A CIFS front-end service can advertise its shares using a NetBIOS name registered with a WINS server (see Setting the NetBIOS Name (optional, CIFS), on page 10-7 of the ARX® CLI Storage-Management Guide). If you used the optional wins-name and/or wins-alias command to set up a special NetBIOS name, you can use this name to find a file:
find wins netbios-name {cifs | nfs} share-name path path [verbose]
netbios-name (1-255 characters) identifies a NetBIOS name for a global server, advertised by a WINS server (for example, CIFSSERVER),
{cifs | nfs} share-name (1-4096 characters) is the share that clients use, and
path (1-4096 characters) specifies the client-visible path to the file. As above, use forward slashes (/) for all paths.
verbose (optional) adds the files NFS filehandles to the output.
bstnA(gbl)# find wins INSURANCE cifs CLAIMS path /index.html
find namespace namespace path path [verbose]
namespace (1-30 characters) identifies the namespace of the file,
path (1-4096 characters) specifies the client-visible path to the file, and
verbose (optional) adds the files NFS filehandles to the output. This output is sometimes incomplete; use one of the other versions of the find command (such as find host) to guarantee complete NFS filehandles.
bstnA(gbl)# find namespace wwmed path /acct/index.html
bstnA(gbl)# find namespace wwmed path /acct/index.html verbose
You may wish to monitor the disk space used by file-history records in the file-history archive. For a list of the records in an archive, you can expand on the show file-history archive command discussed earlier (recall Listing All File-History Archives). Use the name of a particular archive followed by the contents keyword, a time frame, and possibly some options:
show file-history archive name contents time-frame [namespace ns volume path] [report rpt-prefix]
name (1-64 characters) identifies the desired archive.
contents is a required keyword.
time-frame establishes the date(s) for your query. This takes several forms, discussed in the subsections below.
ns (optional, 1-30 characters) selects the records from a particular ARX namespace.
vol-path (optional, 1-1024 characters) focuses on one ARX volume.
report rpt-prefix (optional, 1-255 characters) sends the output to a report. Without this option, the output appears at the CLI prompt. The report name is in rpt-prefix_archive-name_date-time.rpt format; the exact name appears after you enter the command. You can use show reports to list all reports, and show reports report-name to view any report.
show file-history archive name contents date {today | date} [namespace ns volume path] ...
today | date indicates that you want the archive contents from the given day. This shows any and all snapshots that were archived today or on the date you provide. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
bstnA(gbl)# show file-history archive fileRecordsMed contents date today
bstnA(gbl)# show file-history archive fileRecordsMed contents date today namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
You can set a start date and/or an end date for archives contents. To set a range of dates in this way, use the start-date clause, the end-date clause, or both. These go in place of the date clause shown above.
show file-history archive name contents start-date date [namespace ns volume path] ...
where date is some day in the past. The end date is today, implicitly. Use mm/dd/yyyy format.
show file-history archive name contents end-date {today | date} [namespace ns volume path] ...
where today | date is the last day in the query. Implicitly, the start date is the date of the first snapshot in the archive. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
show file-history archive name contents start-date date end-date date ...
bstnA(gbl)# show file-history archive fileRecordsMed contents start-date 01/07/2009 report flRcrdsSinceJan
You can also count back from an end date with the show file-history archive command. To accomplish this, you specify some number of days, weeks, months, and so on that lead up to the end date:
show file-history archive name contents count {days|weeks|months|quarters|years} before {today | date} ...
count (1-100) is the number of days, weeks, or whatever you choose with the next argument.
days|weeks|...|years indicates the time unit.
today | date is the last day in the query. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
bstnA(gbl)# show file-history archive fileRecordsMed contents 3 months before today
From priv-exec mode, use the clear file-history archive command to remove volume configurations (and possibly volume metadata) from an archive:
clear file-history archive name [metadata-only] [time-frame] [namespace ns volume path]
name (1-64 characters) identifies the desired archive.
metadata-only (optional) limits the clearing operation to volume metadata, and preserves all of the selected volume-configuration data. Without the volume metadata, you can query the front-end-service configurations from a given record (Showing Historical Configurations), but you cannot query the locations of particular files or directories (Showing File History).
time-frame (optional) identifies specific file-history record(s) to clear. If you omit this option, the command clears file-history records from the fullest span of time. A specific time frame takes several forms, discussed in the subsections below.
ns (optional, 1-30 characters) selects the records from a particular ARX namespace.
vol-path (optional, 1-1024 characters) focuses on one ARX volume.
bstnA# clear file-history archive fileRecordsMed namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
today | date indicates that you want to clear the archive contents from the given day. This clears any and all configurations/snapshots that were archived today or on the date you provide. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
bstnA# clear file-history archive fileRecordsMed date 01/07/2009 namespace medarcv volume /rcrds
bstnA# clear file-history archive fileRecordsMed date 01/07/2009
You can set a start date and/or an end date for clearing archive records. To set a range of dates in this way, use the start-date clause, the end-date clause, or both. These go in place of the date clause shown above.
where today | date is the last day in the query. Implicitly, the start date is the date of the first snapshot in the archive. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
where date is some day in the past. The end date is today, implicitly. Use mm/dd/yyyy format.
bstnA# clear file-history archive fileRecordsMed metadata-only end-date 01/07/2009
You can also count back from an end date with the clear file-history archive command. To accomplish this, you specify some number of days, weeks, months, and so on that lead up to the end date:
clear file-history archive name [metadata-only] count {days|weeks|months|quarters|years} before {today | date} ...
count (1-100) is the number of days, weeks, or whatever you choose with the next argument.
days|weeks|...|years indicates the time unit.
today | date establishes the last days records to be cleared. Use mm/dd/yyyy format for a date.
bstnA# clear file-history archive fileRecordsMed 4 months before 01/07/2009
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