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Archived Manual Chapter: Monitoring the WANJet Appliance
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12 
The WANJet appliance provides reports that you can use to monitor WAN traffic, connectivity, and performance. You can display the reports on the WANJet appliance by expanding WAN Optimization in the navigation pane and clicking one of the following report options:
Note: To ensure accurate reports, we suggest that you configure an NTP time server for each WANJet appliance to synchronize the time. For more information, see Configuring NTP time servers.
This chapter describes how to display the reports and also explains other ways of obtaining information about performance, including using network diagnostic tools, reviewing operational logs, and integrating with third-party reporting tools.
Information about the WANJet link status and the operational mode of the local appliance appears on the dashboard, in the top left corner of the Configuration utility screen. The dashboard provides a snapshot of system activity, and it is updated every 10 seconds. Therefore, you may see different numbers on the dashboard and the reporting screens described in this chapter because connections are established and terminated very frequently. For more information about the dashboard, see Using the dashboard.
The Real Time Traffic report displays a graph, in real time, of the volume of network traffic on both the LAN and the WAN. interfaces of the local WANJet appliance. The graph provides an at-a-glance overview of the network traffic that is traveling through the WANJet appliance.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Real Time Traffic.
The Real Time Traffic report opens as shown in Figure 12.1. You may need to reply to Security Information questions, and press Enter or spacebar to view the report.
The blue line (LAN In) represents the raw data traveling into the local WANJet appliance on its LAN interface.
The yellow line (LAN Out) represents the data (optimized and non-optimized) traveling out of the local WANJet appliance on its LAN interface.
The red line (WAN In) represents the data (optimized and non-optimized) traveling into the local WANJet on its WAN interface appliance from its remote partner.
The green line (WAN Out) represents the data (reconstituted and passthrough) traveling out of the local WANJet appliance on its WAN interface.
If you run the Real Time Traffic report on a WANJet appliance set up using a one-arm configuration, the report changes. Because there are no LAN and WAN connections in that configuration, you see only two lines showing the Data In and Data Out, as shown in Figure 12.2.
The blue line (Data In) represents the raw data that is traveling into the local WANJet appliance.
The yellow line (Data Out) represents the data traveling out of the local WANJet appliance.
You can generate a Comparative Throughput report based on any combination of traffic direction, data type, and time period. Comparative Throughput reports refresh automatically every two minutes.
At the top of each report, there is a summary of the amount of data handled before and after compression, the bandwidth made available by optimization (expressed as a percentage of the total bandwidth), and the compression ratio achieved. These figures vary according to the selected time period and direction of traffic.
The table below the graph, Throughput summary for the last <0> days, <0> hours, summarizes the amount of raw data and the compressed data on the WANJet appliance since its installation.
The default report that is displayed when you open this screen is the total throughput (direction) for optimized data (data type) for the last hour (time period). As you make your selections, the data displayed on the screen changes accordingly.
You can download any of the reports as text files with comma-separated values (CSV). Then, you can import CSV reports into a database or spreadsheet package.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Comparative Throughput.
Total Throughput
Shows all traffic that the WANJet appliance processes.
Sent Throughput
Shows the outgoing (sent) data that was optimized.
Received Throughput
Shows the incoming (received) data that was optimized.
3.
To determine the portion of data to display and how to display it, click one of the following data type options above the graph:
Performance Increase report
Shows the performance increase by comparing the bandwidth before and after optimization. See Performance Increase report.
Actual Bandwidth Expansion report
Shows the actual bandwidth amount that the WANJet appliance freed during optimization. See Actual Bandwidth Expansion report.
Optimized Data report
Shows a comparison of the amount of network traffic before and after the WANJet appliance optimized the data. See Optimized Data report.
Overall Data report
Shows the amount of passthrough data, raw data, and compressed data. See Overall Data report.
Link Utilization report
Displays the average amount of bandwidth used, compared with the amount of bandwidth that would have been used without optimization. See Link Utilization report.
4.
Below the graph, click the time period for which you want to display data: Hour, Day, Week, Month, Quarter, or Year. The default value is Hour.
The time period you select also determines the interval for which the throughput total summaries appear at the top of the report.
Note: The WANJet appliance saves all of the reports generated for the last hour, every hour. If you stop or restart the WANJet appliance, or any external termination occurs, you can view the last set of saved reports when you restart the WANJet appliance.
5.
To save the report to a file, in the Download Report box, click the Download button.
The displayed report is saved into a text file with a CSV extension.
The Performance Increase report displays the percentage increase in bandwidth that results from using the WANJet appliance.
In this report, shown in Figure 12.3, the vertical axis indicates the percentage increase in bandwidth. The system calculates this percentage by comparing the bandwidth freed up by the WANJet appliance with the bandwidth used after optimization. This is calculated as follows:
For example, if the bandwidth before optimization was 100 MB, and the bandwidth used by data after optimization is 25 MB, the amount of bandwidth freed up by the WANJet appliance is 75 MB. Using these values in the equation results in the following performance increase percentage:
(75 MB/25 MB) x 100 = 300% performance increase
The Actual Bandwidth Expansion report, shown in Figure 12.4, displays the amount of actual bandwidth that the WANJet appliance has freed by optimizing network data.
In this report, the vertical axis represents the bandwidth expansion in kilobytes, megabytes, and so forth. (The unit used depends on the extent of the bandwidth expansion over the selected time period.)
The Optimized Data report displays the difference in the amounts of network traffic before and after the WANJet appliance processes the data.
Figure 12.5 shows the elements in this report:
The vertical axis indicates the amount of network traffic before and after optimization (in kilobytes, megabytes, and so forth).
The Overall Data report allows you to view and compare the amounts of passthrough data, raw data, and optimized data.
Figure 12.6 Overall Data report
Figure 12.6 shows the elements in this report:
The vertical axis indicates the amount of data traveling through the link (in kilobytes, megabytes, gigabytes, and so forth).
The Link Utilization report is similar to the Optimized Data report. However, instead of showing the total amount of data optimized over a given time period, the Link Utilization report displays the average amount of bandwidth used per second, compared to what would have been used if network traffic had not been optimized.
Figure 12.7 shows the elements in this report:
The bars as a whole represent the amount of bandwidth that would have been used if network traffic had not been optimized.
Diagnostic reports provide you with access to a range of useful information, such as IP addresses, error log files, and the results of popular network analysis tools.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
The WANJet Links report displays information about other WANJet appliances that connect to the one you are working on.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Monitoring menu, choose WANJet Links.
The WANJet Links report opens and displays the following information:
Remote IP
IP address of the remote WANJet appliance.
Optimized Packets
Number of packets sent to the remote WANJet appliance that have been optimized.
Retransmitted Packets
Number of packets that the local WANJet appliance retransmitted to the remote WANJet appliance because the first transmission was not acknowledged.
Total Passthrough Packets
Number of packets sent to the remote WANJet appliance that have not been optimized.
The Optimized Sessions report displays all of the network connections at the application layer that the WANJet appliance is currently optimizing. In contrast to the number of optimized sessions shown on the dashboard, the report shows established sessions only, and does not include those in the process of being set up or torn down. Therefore, the number of optimized sessions shown in the dashboard may not match the number in the Optimized Sessions report.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Monitoring menu, choose Optimized Sessions.
The Optimized Sessions screen opens.
LocalIP
IP address and port for the local machine.
Direction
Direction of optimized data traffic flow. A right arrow indicates that the direction is from the local machine to the remote machine. A left arrow indicates that the direction is from the remote machine to the local machine.
RemoteIP
IP address and port for the remote WANJet appliance.
WANJetIP
IP address for the remote WANJet appliance handing the optimized session.
The UDP section contains two columns with the IP address and port number for each UDP sessions source (from) and destination (to).
A passthrough session is a network connection (at the application layer) for traffic that the WANJet appliance does not optimize, but allows that particular type of traffic to pass through the appliance untouched.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Monitoring menu, choose Passthrough Sessions.
The Passthrough Sessions screen opens.
The Passthrough Sessions report has two sections: one for TCP traffic and another for UDP traffic, with specific information in each section.
All Passthrough Sessions
Displays a detailed list of all passthrough sessions.
Optimize Eligible Connections
Displays connections that were set up before the WANJet appliance was last activated. If the protocol and software allow it, you can intercept and reset these connections so that from this point on, they will be optimized. This is most useful for connections that need to be live for a long time so that they can transfer large amounts of data, such as replication processes.
Realtime
Displays the amount of passthrough traffic throughput in real time.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Monitoring menu, choose TCP Statistics.
The TCP Statistics screen opens with the Connections States report displayed, by default.
The Connection States report displays a graph showing the current state for each TCP connection that is visible to the WANJet appliance, including both optimized and passthrough connections. In this report, three lines represent the number of connections in the following states:
ESTABLISHED
Established connections have been successfully opened and are working normally.
TIME-WAIT
Connections in the TIME-WAIT status are waiting to see that the remote TCP received the acknowledgment of a connection termination request. This can take up to four minutes.
Other
Other possible connection states include:
The Packet Retransmissions report displays a blue line that indicates the number of TCP segments (which often correspond to IP packets) that had to be retransmitted per second.
TCP segments that time out without being acknowledged by a destination host are retransmitted by the source host. A high number of these retransmitted segments can indicate network problems.
The Receive Queue Packets Pruned report provides a graphic representation of the number of segments pruned from the TCP receive queue due to socket overrun. Pruning can occur if the TCP receive buffer on the receiving host is too large. The optimal buffer size is twice the product of the bandwidth and the delay.
For more information about TCP tuning background, see http://www-didc.lbl.gov/TCP-tuning/background.html.
Transparent Data Reduction (TDR) further enhances network optimization by storing the contents of data streams in memory. The TDR-2 Statistics report provides information about TDR-2 utilization. For more information about TDR, refer to Understanding optimization: Transparent Data Reduction.
Note: The WANJet appliance updates the statistics in the report at the completion of a connection. For example, if you initiate a file transfer session, the updated TDR-2 statistics are available when the TCP connection is closed.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Monitoring menu, choose TDR Statistics.
The TDR Statistics report opens and displays the following TDR-2 information:
WANJetIP
IP address of the remote WANJet appliance.
Sent Bytes (TDR-2)
The amount of sent data, in bytes, to which TDR-2 optimization has been applied since the WANJet link became active.
Sent Bytes (other)
Amount of sent data, in bytes, to which TDR-2 optimization has not been applied.
Received Bytes (TDR-2)
Amount of received data, in bytes, to which TDR-2 optimization has been applied.
Received Bytes (other)
Amount of received data, in bytes, to which TDR-2 optimization has not been applied.
TDR-2 efficiency %
Percentage of total data sent and received across the link to which TDR-2 optimization has been applied. This percentage represents the increase in performance due to TDR-2 optimization. The bold number at the bottom of the report is the average TDR-2 effectiveness for all the remote WANJet appliance links to the local WANJet appliance.
Quality of Service (QoS) policies can improve network performance by dedicating bandwidth to specific network traffic.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Monitoring menu, choose QoS.
The QoS report opens and displays the following information:
Remote WANJet
The IP address of a remote WANJet or the alias of a WAN link that has a QoS policy assigned to it.
Policy
Name of the QoS policy assigned to traffic on the link. Each remote WANJet appliance and WAN link has a default policy (shown as Default) in addition to any policies that you create.
Rate
Minimum bandwidth assigned to the policy when the traffic load rises. For example, if you assigned a bandwidth of 50% to the policy and the link bandwidth is 100 mb/s, the rate would be 50 mb/s.
Ceiling
Maximum percentage that the policy can borrow from unused bandwidth.
Bytes Sent
Number of bytes sent in accordance with the policy.
Dropped
Number of qualified packets that the policy could not handle.
The Diagnose Connectivity report displays details about all types of configurations (Ethernet, IP, bridge, and remote WANJet appliances).
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Connectivity menu, choose All.
The Diagnose Connectivity screen opens.
This report includes the information for all the configuration types, each of which also has a separate report. The information is the same in the combined report and the individual reports, as described in the following sections.
The Diagnose Ethernet report displays details about the Ethernet interfaces on the local WANJet appliance, including the speed, flow control, transmitted and received bytes, errors, and collisions. For WANJet appliances to work correctly, the speed and duplex settings for the LAN and WAN interfaces should be the same. The Diagnose Ethernet screen confirms these settings.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Connectivity menu, choose Ethernet.
The Diagnose Ethernet report opens and includes a section for each of the Ethernet interfaces on the WANJet appliance:
For each interface, the report includes information about the speed and duplex settings, flow control, data transmitted, errors, and collisions.
The LAN interface must connect to the LAN switch or router.
The WAN interface must connect to the WAN gateway.
Note: If a redundant pair is present, the Peer interface must be connected to the redundant peer. For more information, see Configuring redundant peers.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Connectivity menu, choose IP.
The Diagnose IP report opens and displays the following information:
The netmask of the local subnet.
This determines how much of the address identifies the subnetwork on which the WANJet appliance host resides, and how much identifies the host itself.
The Diagnose Bridge report displays details of the internal connectivity, or bridge, between Ethernet interfaces between the two WANJet appliances.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Connectivity menu, choose Bridge.
The Diagnose Bridge report opens and displays the following information:
The LAN interface must connect to the LAN switch or router.
The WAN interface must connect to the WAN gateway.
The Diagnose Remote WANJet report displays details about the remote WANJet appliances that are connected to the local WANJet appliance.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the Connectivity menu, choose Remote WANJets.
The Diagnose Remote WANJets report opens and displays the following information for each remote WANJet appliance:
The software version number, which is compared to the version number of the software on the local WANJet appliance
The WANJet appliance type, which is Single if there is no redundant peer at the remote end
Whether the local WANJet appliance can connect to the remote WANJet appliance on the ports that WANJet appliances use to communicate with each other. These ports are 3701, 3702, and 3703, by default.
The Diagnostic Log contains status information and errors that the WANJet appliance records during a session. This log keeps you informed and helps resolve problems that you might encounter while working with the WANJet appliance.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Diagnostics.
The initial diagnostics screen opens.
2.
From the General menu, choose Diagnostic Log.
The Diagnostic Log shows information about the WANJet appliance.
You can create a system snapshot and download it as a zipped text file to your hard disk. You can provide this zipped text file to the F5 Networks Technical Support team to help resolve technical issues.
1.
At the top of the Diagnostic Log screen, click System Snapshot to get the current system status.
The browser opens a download window for you to save the snapshot file to your local disk.
2.
Save the snapshot file. The system snapshot file is named snapshot.txt.gz. This is a compressed plain text file.
If you use NetFlow for network monitoring, you can configure a NetFlow server on the WANJet appliance. If configured, the WANJet appliance transfers traffic data to the NetFlow server for analysis.
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Monitoring.
The WANJet Netflow and SNMP screen opens.
2.
Check the Netflow Server IP box, and type the IP address of the NetFlow server.
3.
Click Save.
The WANJet appliance provides statistics for network and application performance through Remote Network Monitoring (RMON2). You can configure the WANJet appliance so that you can view RMON2 reports (data trees), which are part of the SNMP data trees that are stored on the WANJet appliance. The RMON2 data is stored in a MIB. For information on the WANJet MIB file, see Appendix C, WANJet Appliance Private MIB File.
The RMON2 data on the WANJet appliance includes data sent and received between two nodes, the IP addresses of these nodes, the port used to send and receive data, data size before and after the WANJet appliance processes it, times at which data was sent, and the numbers of connections. You can configure the WANJet appliance to report these statistics as Raw Data (prior to being optimized) or WANJet Data (optimized).
1.
In the navigation pane, expand WAN Optimization and click Monitoring.
The WANJet Netflow and SNMP screen opens.
2.
To collect RMON2 data, check the Enable RMON2 Logs box and select an option:
Raw Data
To gather RMON2 logs before the WANJet appliance processes traffic.
WANJet Data
To gather RMON2 logs after the WANJet appliance processes traffic.
3.
Click Save.
For additional instructions, see Understanding the RMON2 configuration settings, following. Note that the SNMP server must have access to the WANJet appliance.
To view the RMON2 data tree, you must use SNMP-compliant software. You need to provide SNMP-compliant software with the IP address of the WANJet appliance.
RMON2 provides network and application protocol statistics (bytes transmitted and bytes received) that include both the unoptimized protocol statistics from the LAN side, and the optimized (compressed) protocol statistics from the WAN side. When enabling RMON2 logs as described in the previous section, you can configure the WANJet appliance to report this information as:
If your network monitoring system recognizes only the standard RMON2 variables, select the option that reports the type of data you prefer to monitor. If you want to monitor the unoptimized data, select the Raw Data option. If you want to monitor the optimized data, select the WANJet Data option.
If your RMON2-based monitoring software recognizes the F5 Networks-added table entries, the choice of setting may not be significant. Select the setting that allows you to use both types of data in the way best suited to the configuration of your network management software.
By selecting the Raw Data setting on the WANJet NetFLow and SNMP screen, you instruct the WANJet appliance to place unoptimized (LAN-side) protocol statistics into the standard variables reported through RMON2. The F5-specific second set of variables contains the optimized protocol statistics.
For example, performing an SNMP walk of the protocolDirTable object (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.16.11.2 in the RMON2 MIB) might display the following variable names in protocolDirDescr:
In this example, the first three protocols in both lists are permanent entries. The fourth protocol in both shows a protocol that is added to the tables at runtime. The protocol, any.ip.tcp.22, contains statistics for the Secure Shell (SSH) protocol. This is true for both the Raw Data and WANJet Data options.
By selecting the WANJet Data setting on the WANJet NetFlow and SNMP screen, you instruct the WANJet appliance to place optimized (WAN-side) protocol statistics into the standard variables reported through RMON2. The F5-specific second set of variables contains the unoptimized protocol statistics.
For example, performing an SNMP walk of the protocolDirTable object in this configuration might have the following variable names in protocolDirDescr:
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