Applies To:

Show Versions Show Versions

Manual Chapter: bigpipe Command Reference
Manual Chapter
Table of Contents   |   << Previous Chapter   |   Next Chapter >>

This appendix contains command syntax for the new and updated bigpipe commands that you use to configure the VIPRIONTM system. For a full bigpipe command reference, see the BIG-IP® Command Line Interface Guide.
The edit option of the bigpipe configuration commands is not available on VIPRION systems.
The bigpipe utility has two new commands that you use to configure clustered systems: cluster and software. Additionally, you can use the new parameters of the bigpipe daemon, failover, profile udp, snat, system, virtual, and vlan commands to configure VIPRION systems.
You use the cluster command to modify the configuration of the primary blade in a cluster. When you do this, the system automatically propagates the changes to the other blades in the cluster. This is known as cluster synchronization.
Sets the floating management IP address for cluster default to an IP address of 192.168.217.44:
Sets the static IP address for slot 1 of cluster default to an IP address of 192.168.217.43:
Puts the blade cluster member 2 into the priming state, which prevents it from proceeding to the RUNNING cluster quorum state. This is useful for recovery when a blade is in a reboot loop.
addr
Specifies an IP address for the cluster or cluster member.
priming
Prevents a cluster member from proceeding to the RUNNING cluster quorum state, which is useful when a blade is in a reboot loop.
current primary slot ID
Displays the slot number into which the primary blade in the cluster is inserted.
(enable | disable)
Enables or disables the specified cluster or cluster member.
ha state
Displays the high availability state of the cluster. The options are:
Active
Indicates that a cluster is online and actively passing traffic.
Forced Offline
Indicates that a cluster is offline and cannot become active due to an administrator action.
Offline
Indicates that a cluster is offline and cannot become active
Standby
Indicates that a cluster is online and available to become active
A cluster with a status of Standby changes to an Active status when the other cluster in a redundant system configuration fails over.
licensed
Indicates whether the cluster member is licensed.
list
Displays the current configuration of the cluster.
members
Adds a member to a cluster. A cluster member is a slot into which you insert a blade. The cluster member is identified by the number of the slot.
min up members
Specifies the minimum number of cluster members that must be up for the cluster to remain active. The default is 0 (zero).
min up members (enable/disable)
When enabled, specifies that when the number of active cluster members is below the value of the min up members option, the cluster fails over to its peer. Enable this parameter when you create a redundant system configuration. The default is disable.
Note: Make sure you modify the min up members number appropriately when you take blades down in a cluster. Otherwise, you can get into the condition where disabling a cluster member brings the cluster below min up members, which can cause the cluster to fail over to its peer.
show
Displays the current state of the cluster and each cluster member.
state
Displays the following information about a cluster member.
build
Displays the build number of the software that is currently installed on the blade in the specified slot.
hotfix version
Displays the version of the software hotfix that is currently installed on the blade in the specified slot.
product
Displays the type of system.
slot id
Displays the slot number into which the blade is inserted.
version
Displays the version of the software, including the license information, that is currently installed on the blade in the specified slot.
heartbeat monitor
Enables or disables the heartbeat on the specified daemon, or performs an action. Typically, if a daemon does not periodically connect with its heartbeat location, it is restarted automatically. This command allows you to disable automatic restart. The daemons that supply a heartbeat are: bcm56xxd, bd, bigdbd, clusterd, com_srv, gtmd, mcpd, pvac, sod, and tmm. The default is enable.
Specifies the action the daemon should take if no heartbeat is detected. You can specify the following actions with the specified daemon:
bcm56xxd
The default and only action available for use with daemon bcm56xxd is restart.
bd
The actions that are available for use with the daemon bd are restart, restart all, reboot, go offline, go offline, and restart. The default is restart.
bigdbd
The actions that are available for use with the daemon bigdbd are restart, restart all, reboot, go offline, go offline, and restart. The default is restart.
clusterd
The default and only action available for use with daemon clusterd is go offline downinks restart.
com_srv
The default and only action available for use with daemon com_srv is restart.
gtmd
The actions that are available for use with the daemon gtmd when the system is licensed for the Global Traffic Manager are restart, restart all, reboot, go offline, go offline restart. The default is go offline restart.
mcpd
The actions that are available for use with the daemon mcpd are restart, restart all, reboot, go offline, go offline and restart. The default is restart all.
pvac
The default and only action available for use with daemon pvac is restart.
sod
The default and only action available for use with daemon sod is restart all.
tmm
The default and only action available for use with the TMM daemon is go offline downlinks.
heartbeat monitor redundant
Specifies the action the daemon should take if no heartbeat is detected on the redundant heartbeat monitor. See the heartbeat monitor option, above, for a list of actions that are available for each daemon.
heartbeat monitor stand alone
Specifies the action the daemon should take if no heartbeat is detected on a standalone heartbeat monitor. See the heartbeat monitor option, above, for a list of actions that are available for each daemon.
proc not run action
Specifies the action the daemon should take if a configured traffic or system management action is not run. See the heartbeat monitor option, above, for a list of actions that are available for each daemon.
running
Enables or disables actions configured for the traffic management and system management daemons. You can use this feature to disable the action a daemon takes during failover. For example, when you want to stop a daemon and you do not want the cluster to failover, you can issue the running disable command for the daemon. The default is disable.
running timeout
Specifies the length of time you want disabled actions to remain disabled. The default is 10 seconds.
Important: If you are assigned a user role that allows you to create objects, and you are assigned access to all partitions, then before you create an object in a specific partition, you must use the bigpipe shell command to set your Write partition to the partition in which you want to create the object. For more information, see the Configuring Administrative Partitions and Managing User Accounts chapters in the BIG-IP® Network and System Management Guide.
Failover is a process that occurs when one cluster in a redundant system configuration becomes unavailable, thereby requiring a peer cluster to assume the processing of traffic originally targeted for the unavailable cluster. To facilitate coordination of the failover process, each cluster has a Unit ID.
Causes the active cluster to go into the standby state, forcing the other cluster in the redundant system configuration to become active:
failback
Initiates failback for an active-active system. Failback re-establishes normal system processing when a previously-unavailable cluster becomes available again. F5 recommends that you do not use active-active mode with clusters.
offline
Changes the status of a cluster to forced offline.
online
Changes the status of a cluster from forced offline to either active or standby, depending upon the status of the other cluster in a redundant system configuration.
standby
Causes the active cluster to fail over to a standby status, causing the standby cluster to become sctive.
Use these options to configure failover for the system:
active-active mode
Enables or disables active-active mode for a cluster in a redundant system configuration. The default value is disable. F5 recommends that you do not use an active-active configuration with clusters.
custom addr
Specifies the self-IP address or management IP address on the cluster that the network failover mechanism uses to listen for peer responses. When using network failover, this is a required setting.
custom peer addr
Specifies the self-IP address or management IP address on the peer system that the network failover mechanism uses to determine whether the peer is responsive. When using network failover, this is a required setting.
force active
When enabled, makes the cluster prefer to be the active cluster. The default value is disable.
force standby
When enabled, makes the cluster prefer to be the standby cluster. The default value is disable.
multicast peer
Adds a multicast peer or deletes a multicast peer from the specified cluster for failover purposes. When you add a multicast peer you include the following options:
addr
Specifies the multicast IP address associated with the management interface on the peer cluster.
interface
Specifies the management interface of the cluster you are configuring. The options are mgmt or eth0. The default is eth0.
name
Specifies the name of peer cluster in this redundant system configuration.
port
Specifies the number of the service that you want to process the multicast failover communication traffic between the clusters.
network failover
Specifies, when enabled, that this cluster utilizes the network to determine the status of the peer cluster. The default value is disable.
partition
Displays the partition within which the failover object resides.
peer mgmt addr
Specifies the floating management IP address of the peer cluster.
redundant
Enables or disables redundancy for a cluster in a redundant system configuration. The default is disable.
standby link down time
Specifies the amount of time, within the valid range of 0 - 10 seconds, that the interfaces are down before the cluster fails over to standby. Use this setting to prompt peer switches to reset and relearn their Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) tables after a failover. The default value is 0 (zero) seconds, which disables this option. When using network failover, do not enable this feature unless you configure the custom addr and custom peer addr settings to use the management port.
unicast peer
Adds a unicast peer or deletes a unicast peer from the specified cluster for failover purposes. When you add a unicast peer you include the following options:
dest addr
Specifies a static self IP address associated with VLAN HA1 on the peer cluster. This is the IP address on the peer that receives a failover message from the cluster you are configuring.
name
Specifies the name of peer cluster in this redundant system configuration.
port
Specifies the number of the service that you want to process the unicast failover communication traffic between the clusters.
source addr
Specifies a static self IP address associated with VLAN HA1 on the cluster you are configuring. Failover messages from the cluster to its peer originate from this address.
unit
Specifies a number for a cluster in a redundant system configuration. The default value is 1.
Important: If you are assigned a user role that allows you to create objects, and you are assigned access to all partitions, then before you create an object in a specific partition, you must use the bigpipe shell command to set your Write partition to the partition in which you want to create the object. For more information, see the Configuring Administrative Partitions and Managing User Accounts chapters in the BIG-IP® Network and System Management Guide.
The pool command creates, deletes, modifies, and displays the pool definitions on the traffic management system. Pools group the member servers together to use a common load balancing algorithm.
Creates a pool with two members 10.2.3.11, and 10.2.3.12, where both members use the Round Robin load balancing method, and the default HTTP monitor checks for member availability:
Deletes the pool mypool: (Note that all references to a pool must be removed before a pool may be deleted.)
action on svcdown
Specifies the action to take if the service specified in the pool is marked down. Possible values are none, reset, drop, or reselect. You can specify no action with none, you can reset the system with reset, you can drop connections using drop, or, you can reselect a node for the next packet that comes in on a Layer 4 connection if the existing connections service is marked down by specifying reselect. The default is none.
<ip:service>
Specifies an IP address and service being assigned to a pool as a member. For example, 10.2.3.12:http.
ip tos to client and ip tos to server
Specifies the Type of Service (ToS) level to use when sending packets to a client or server. The default is 65535.
lb method
Specifies the load balancing mode that the system is to use for the specified pool. You can use these options:
dynamic ratio - Specifies a range of numbers that you want the system to use in conjunction with the ratio load balancing method. The default ratio number is 1.
fastest - Indicates that the system passes a new connection based on the fastest response of all currently active nodes in a pool. This method may be particularly useful in environments where nodes are distributed across different logical networks.
fastest app resp - Indicates that the system passes a new connection based on the fastest application response of all currently active nodes in a pool.
l3 addr - Indicates that the system passes connections sequentially to each member configured using its IP address. The IP address is a Layer 3 address.
least conn - Indicates that the system passes a new connection to the node that has the least number of current connections.
least sessions - Indicates that the system passes a new connection to the node that has the least number of current sessions. Least Sessions methods work best in environments where the servers or other equipment you are load balancing have similar capabilities. This is a dynamic load balancing method, distributing connections based on various aspects of real-time server performance analysis, such as the current number of sessions.
member dynamic ratio - Indicates that the system passes a new connection to the member based on continuous monitoring of the servers, which are continually changing. This is a dynamic load balancing method, distributing connections based on various aspects of real-time server performance analysis, such as the current number of connections per node or the fastest node response time.
member least conn - Indicates that the system passes a new connection to the member that has the least number of current connections.
member observed - Indicates that the system passes connections sequentially to each member based on observed status of the member.
member predictive - Indicates that the system passes connections sequentially to each member based on a predictive algorithm.
member ratio - Specifies a ratio number that you want the system to use in conjunction with the ratio load balancing method. The default ratio number is 1.
node ratio - Specifies a ratio number that you want the system to use in conjunction with the ratio load balancing method. The default ratio number is 1.
observed - Indicates that the system passes connections sequentially to each node based on observed status of the member.
predictive - Indicates that the system passes connections sequentially to each node based on a predictive algorithm.
rr - Indicates that the system passes connections sequentially to each member. Round Robin is the default load balancing method.
link qos to client and link qos to server
Specifies the Quality of Service (QoS) level to use when sending packets to a client or server. The default is 0.
min active members
Specifies the minimum number of members that must remain available for traffic to be confined to a priority group when using priority-based activation. The default is 0.
min up members
Enables or disables this feature. The default is disable.
You can also specify the minimum number of members that must remain up for traffic to be confined to a priority group when using priority-based activation. If the number specified is exceeded, the action specified happens. The default is 0.
monitor all
Creates a monitor rule for the pool. You can specify a monitor rule that marks the pool down if the specified number of monitors are not successful.
nat
Enables or disables NAT connections for the pool.
partition
Displays the partition within which the pool resides.
<pool key list>
Specifies a list of pool names separated by a space. A pool name is an identifying string from 1 to 31 characters, for example, new_pools.
priority
Specifies a priority that you want to assign to a pool member, to ensure that traffic is directed to that member before being directed to a member of a lower priority.
slow ramp time
Provides the ability to cause a pool member that has just been enabled, or marked up, to receive proportionally less traffic than other members in the pool. The proportion of traffic the member accepts is determined by how long the member has been up in comparison to the slow ramp time set for the pool. For example, if a pool using Round Robin has a slow ramp time of 60 seconds, and the pool member has been up for only 30 seconds, it receives approximately half the amount of new traffic as other pool members that have been up for more than 60 seconds. At 45 seconds, it receives approximately three quarters of the new traffic. Slow ramp time is particularly useful for least connections load balancing mode. The default is 0.
snat
Enables or disables SNAT connections for the pool.
unit
Specifies the Unit ID used by this pool in an active-active redundant system configuration.
Important: If you are assigned a user role that allows you to create objects, and you are assigned access to all partitions, then before you create an object in a specific partition, you must use the bigpipe shell command to set your Write partition to the partition in which you want to create the object. For more information, see the Configuring Administrative Partitions and Managing User Accounts chapters in the BIG-IP® Network and System Management Guide.
Creates a custom UDP profile named myudpprofile that inherits its settings from the system default udp profile:
allow payload
Provides the ability to allow the passage of datagrams that contain header information, but no essential data. The default is disable.
datagram lb
Provides the ability to load balance UDP datagram by datagram. The default is disable.
defaults from
Specifies the profile that you want to use as the parent profile. Your new profile inherits all settings and values from the parent profile.
idle timeout
Specifies the number of seconds that a connection is idle before the connection is eligible for deletion. You can also specify immediate, indefinite, or default. The default is 60 seconds.
ip tos
Specifies the Type of Service level that the traffic management system assigns to UDP packets when sending them to clients.
link qos
Specifies the Quality of Service level that the system assigns to UDP packets when sending them to clients.
no cksum
When enabled, the system does not perform the check summing process on the packets that the virtual server to which this profile is assigned processes. The default is disable.
partition
Displays the partition within which the profile resides.
profile(1), virtual(1), bigpipe(1)
You can use the software command to:
1.
To copy the software image file local-install-9.6.1.565.0.im from /root to /shared/images then syncs to other blades, use this syntax:
The system copies the software image file local-install-9.6.1.565.0.im to the software staging area.
2.
When you are currently running on volume HD1.1, to install build 565.0 of BIG-IP version 9.6.1 on volume HD1.2 of the cluster, use this syntax:
4.
When you are currently running on volume HD1.1, to reboot the system to volume HD1.2, use this syntax:
desired
Installs the specified version of the software on the cluster.
hotfixes
Copies the specified files to a location on the cluster from which the system can install the hotfix.
images
Copies the specified files to a location on the cluster from which the system can install the software.
status
Displays the current status of the software installation on all disk volumes for all slots in the cluster.
volumes
Displays the volumes on the cluster.
Important: If you are assigned a user role that allows you to create objects, and you are assigned access to all partitions, then before you create an object in a specific partition, you must use the bigpipe shell command to set your Write partition to the partition in which you want to create the object. For more information, see the Configuring Administrative Partitions and Managing User Accounts chapters in the BIG-IP® Network and System Management Guide.
Sets up a remote host named bigip151 with an IP address of 172.27.226.151 and a host name of bigip151.saxon.net:
archive encrypt
Specifies whether the system archive encryption feature is set to on, off, or on request. The default value is on request. Note that you must configure the system archive encrypt option in conjunction with the configsync encrypt and configsync passphrase options.
The reason for this is that when you perform a configuration synchronization of two clusters in a redundant system configuration, the process involves saving a *.ucs file from one system onto the peer system, and then installing the saved file on the peer system. You use the system archive encrypt option to indicate whether the process of saving the *.ucs file creates an encrypted or unencrypted file. For example, you can set the configsync encrypt option to enable, and configure a passphrase using the configsync passphrase option. If you use the default value, on request, for the system archive encrypt option, then when a user saves the *.ucs file, and provides the passphrase, the *.ucs file is encrypted. If the user does not provide the passphrase, the *.ucs file is not encrypted.
auth source type
Specifies the default user authorization source. The default value is local. When user accounts that access the system reside on a remote server, the value of auth source type is the type of server that you are using for authentication, for example, ldap.
console inactivity timeout
Specifies the number of seconds of inactivity before the system logs out a user that is logged in. The default value is 0. This means that no timeout is set.
custom addr
Indicates a user-specified IP address for the system. The default value is none.
It is important to note that you must set the host addr mode option to custom, if you want to specify an IP address using custom addr. For more information, see the host addr mode option, following.
failsafe action
Specifies the action that the system takes when the switch board fails. The default is go offline abort tm.
go offline
Specifies that when the switch board fails, the system goes offline.
go offline abort tm
Specifies that when the switch board fails, the system goes offline and stops the traffic management system.
reboot
Specifies that after the active cluster fails over to its peer, it reboots while the peer processes the traffic.
restart all
Specifies that when the switch board fails, the system restarts all system services.
gui setup
Enables or disables the Setup utility in the browser-based Configuration utility. The default value is enable.
When you configure a system using the command line interface, disable this option. Disabling the gui setup option of the system command allows your system administrators to use the browser-based Configuration utility without having to run the Setup utility.
host addr mode
Specifies the type of host address assigned to the system. The default value is mgmt, which indicates that the host address is the management port of the system.
If you use the statemirror option, then the host address of the system is shared by the other cluster in a redundant system configuration. In case of system failure, the traffic to the other system is routed to this system.
If you use the custom option, you must specify a custom IP address for the system using the custom addr option. For more information, see the custom addr option, above.
hostname
Specifies a local name for the system. The default value is bigip1.
hosts allow include
Warning: Do not use this parameter without assistance from the F5 Technical Support team. The system does not validate the commands issued using the include parameter. If you use this parameter incorrectly, you put the functionality of the system at risk.
lcd display
Enables or disables the system menu to display on the LCD panel on the front of the system. The default is enable.
localusers
Adds to the system or removes from the system company-specific user accounts. The system comes with the user accounts root, admin, and support.
net reboot
Enables or disables the network reboot feature. The default is disable. If you enable this feature and then reboot the system, the system boots from an ISO image on the network, rather than from an internal media drive. Use this option only when you want to install software on the system, for example, for an upgrade or a re-installation. Note that this setting reverts to disabled after you reboot the system a second time.
partition
Displays the partition within which the system object resides.
quiet boot
Enables or disables the quiet boot feature. The default is enable. If you enable this feature, the system suppresses informational text on the console during the boot cycle.
remote host
Adds a remote host to, or removes a remote host from, the /etc/hosts file. The default value is none. You must enter both an IP address and a fully qualified domain name (FQDN) or alias for each host that you want to add to the file.
This command creates, displays, and modifies settings for VLANs. VLANs are part of the configuration of the network components. VLANs can be based on either ports or tags.
When creating a VLAN, the system automatically assigns a tag value for the VLAN, unless you specify a tag value on the command line. VLANs can have both tagged and untagged interfaces. You can add an interface to a single VLAN as an untagged interface. You can also add an interface to multiple VLANs as a tagged interface.
Creates the VLAN myvlan that includes the interfaces 1/1.2, 1/1.3, and 1/1.4 on blade 1:
failsafe
Enables a fail-safe mechanism that causes the active cluster to fail over to a redundant cluster when loss of traffic is detected on a VLAN, and traffic is not restored during the failsafe timeout period for that VLAN. The default action set with VLAN fail-safe is restart all. When the fail-safe mechanism is triggered, all the daemons are restarted and the cluster fails over. The default is disable.
fdb
The fdb associates MAC addresses with interfaces and trunks.
interfaces
Specifies a list of interfaces that you want to assign to the VLAN.
interfaces tagged
Specifies a list of tagged interfaces. A tagged interface is an interface that you assign to a VLAN in a way that causes the system to add a VLAN tag into the header of any frame passing through that interface. Use tagged interfaces when you want to assign a single interface to multiple VLANs.
learning
Specifies whether switch ports placed in the VLAN are configured for switch learning, forwarding only, or dropped. Possible values are: enable, disable forward, or disable drop. The default is enable.
mac masq
Configures a shared MAC masquerade address. You can share the media access control (MAC) masquerade address between clusters in a redundant system configuration. This has the following advantages:
mtu
Sets a specific maximum transition unit (MTU) for the VLAN. The default is 1500.
source check
Specifies that only connections that have a return route in the routing table are accepted. The default is disable.
tag
Specifies a number that the system adds into the header of any frame passing through the VLAN.
timeout
Specifies the number of seconds that an active cluster can run without detecting network traffic on this VLAN before it initiates a failover. The default is 90 seconds.
trunks
Specifies a list of trunks. A trunk is a combination of two or more interfaces and cables configured as one link.
trunks tagged
Specifies a list of tagged trunks. A tagged trunk is a trunk that you assign to a VLAN in a way that causes the system to add a VLAN tag into the header of any frame passing through the trunk. Use tagged trunks when you want to assign a single trunk to multiple VLANs.
interface(1), self(1), vlangroup(1), virtual(1), bigpipe(1)
Table of Contents   |   << Previous Chapter   |   Next Chapter >>

Was this resource helpful in solving your issue?




NOTE: Please do not provide personal information.



Incorrect answer. Please try again: Please enter the words to the right: Please enter the numbers you hear:

Additional Comments (optional)